Therapeutics - Fluids 3

Card Set Information

Author:
kyleannkelsey
ID:
260755
Filename:
Therapeutics - Fluids 3
Updated:
2014-02-07 12:44:04
Tags:
Therapeutics Fluids
Folders:
Therapeutics - Fluids 3
Description:
Therapeutics - Fluids 3
Show Answers:

Home > Flashcards > Print Preview

The flashcards below were created by user kyleannkelsey on FreezingBlue Flashcards. What would you like to do?


  1. 3% NaCl is classified as having what type of tonicity?
    Hypertonic
  2. 0.45% NaCl is classified as having what type of tonicity?
    Hypotonic
  3. What solutions are classified as isotonic?
    0.9% NaCl, LR, R, D5W
  4. Would you expect a shift of fluids between the ICF and ECF with administration of an isotonic solution?
    No
  5. Would you expect a shift of fluids between the ICF and ECF with administration of a hypertonic solution, why?
    Yes, because it has a greater tonicity than the ICF, so fluid flows from the ICF to the ECF
  6. Would you expect a shift of fluids between the ICF and ECF with administration of a hypotonic solution, why?
    Yes, because it has a lower tonicity than the ICF, so fluid flows from the ECF to the ICF
  7. What are the main crystalloid solutions used in practice?
    NS, 1/2 NS, 3% NaCl, LR and R
  8. The plasma volume expanding capability of crystalloids is directly related to its _________ Concentration.
    Na
  9. When you give D5W, it will distribute in what way?
    As free water, 2/3 to ICF, 1/3 to ECF
  10. Crystalloid or Colloids require more volume to achieve the same effect.
    Crystalloids
  11. Would a higher or lower Na conc. Crystalloid solution cause a greater expansion on the volume of plasma?
    Higher
  12. The Na portion of NS contributes what tonicity to the solution?
    154 mEq/L
  13. The Cl portion of NS contributes what tonicity to the solution?
    154 mEq/L
  14. Would you potentially use NS for metabolic alkalosis?
    Yes
  15. What are the main uses for NS?
    Peri/post operation, shock, hemorrhage, w/ a blood transfusion, burns, fluid challenge, hyponatremia
  16. Would you use NS to treat hyponatremia?
    Yes
  17. What group of patients might experience fluid overload when given NS?
    CHR and renal failure
  18. Can NS be given for EFV replacement from any cause?
    Yes
  19. You have an increased concentration of _________ during metabolic alkalosis.
    Bicarbonate (HC03)
  20. Describe how metabolic alkalosis occurs:
    NaCl is leaving the patient, creating a Cl- deficit, so HCO3- enters the blood to balance the loss, causing metabolic alkalosis
  21. When treating metabolic alkalosis with NS, is the Na or Cl the important ion in correcting the problem?
    Cl
  22. What is a fluid challenge?
    Giving fluid more rapidly than normal to raise low blood pressure
  23. If you give too much NS, what type of pH imbalance can you create?
    Non-gap metabolic acidosis
  24. After giving too much NS, a patient develops non-gap metabolic acidosis, what ion is this contributed to?
  25. Cl-
  26. What type of saline solution provides both free water and Na?
    0.45% NaCl solution
  27. What type of ECFV depletion state can be treated with 0.45% NaCl?
    Hypertonic
  28. What are potential adverse effects of 0.45% NaCl solutions and how can they be avoided?
    Hyponatremia, closely monitor serum Na
  29. A patient has high and and TBW depletion, what NaCl would be appropriate to give?
    1/2NS
  30. What state is 3% NaCl used to treat?
    Severe, symptomatic hyponatremia
  31. (True/False) 3% NaCl should be infused slowly or rapidly?
    Slowly
  32. What are the potential adverse effects of administering 3% NaCl?
    ECFV overload and Hypernatremia
  33. If you want to raise the patient Na Osmolality in the blood, what type of NaCl solution might you give?
    3% NaCl
  34. In the event of a traumatic brain injury, intracranial pressure increases, what solution should you give to lower this pressure?
    Hypertonic saline
  35. What are the potential adverse effects of IV hypertonic saline administration?
    HYPERosmolality, HYPERnatremia, CHF, HYPOkalemia, HYPERchloremic acidosis, coagulopathy, phlebitis and renal failure
  36. What are the potential CNS adverse effects of hypertonic saline?
    Decreased level of consciousness, rebound intracranial hypertension, seizres, central pontine myelinolysis, subdural and intraparenchymal hemorrhage
  37. What is another term for hyperchloremic acidosis?
    Non-gap acidosis
  38. Why can Hypertonic saline cause coagulopathy?
  39. By dilution of clotting factors
  40. Describe the electrolyte composition of lactated ringers:
    Closely resembles the electrolyte composition of normal blood serum
  41. What causes of ECFV is Lactated Ringer’s solution usually used for?
    Burns, dehydration, lower GI fluid loss, mild metabolic acidosis
  42. Would you use LR as a perioperative fluid?
    Yes
  43. What ions does LR replace?
    Na, Cl, K, lactate and Ca
  44. Does LR contain Mg or PO4?
    No
  45. In what group may LR cause fluid overload in?
    CHR and renal failure
  46. Can you use LR for brain trauma?
    No, may worsen pressure
  47. What is the acid/base effect of lactate in LR?
    Works as a buffer to increase the pH
  48. What group of patients might be at risk of metabolic alkalosis when they receive large volumes of LR?
    Liver disease patients
  49. What group of patients might be at risk of lactic acidosis when they receive large volumes of LR?
    Liver disease patients
  50. Should you use LR in patients with liver disease?
    No, could cause lactic acidosis or metabolic alkalosis
  51. What makes LR useful in patients with metabolic acidosis?
    Low Cl content
  52. If a patient is showing accumulation of Cl, but they need more volume, what fluid might be a good choice?
    LR

What would you like to do?

Home > Flashcards > Print Preview