Blood Test Lab

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Shira
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260938
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Blood Test Lab
Updated:
2014-03-03 13:51:37
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Blood Test Lab
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  1. The definition of _?_ is the percentage of red blood cells per volume of blood.
    hematocrit
  2. When you spin a centrifuge, the blood separates into three layers.
    What does the top layer contain?
    About what percentage of the blood makes up the top layer?
    What is the middle layer called?
    What does the middle layer contain?
    About what percentage of the blood makes up the middle layer?
    What does the bottom layer contain?
    About what percentage of the blood makes up the bottom layer?
    • Plasma
    • 55%
    • Buffy coat
    • Leukocytes and platelets
    • <1%
    • Erythrocytes
    • 45%
  3. What is the normal hematocrit for an adult male?
    47%+/-5%
  4. What is the normal hematocrit for an adult female?
    42%+/-5%
  5. If someone has too many red blood cells, they have a condition known as _?_.
    Polycythemia 
  6. If someone has too few red blood cells, they have a condition known as _?_.
    Anemia
  7. If you have inadequate amounts of intrinsic factor, you will have inadequate absorption of which vitamin?
    B-12
  8. If you have inadequate amounts of vitamin B-12, you will have inadequate cell _?_.
    division
  9. If you have inadequate amounts of intrinsic factor, you have which type of anemia?
    Pernicious anemia
  10. If you have inadequate iron, you can not synthesize enough of what molecule that is contained in red blood cells?
    Hemoglobin
  11. If you have inadequate iron, you have which type of anemia?
    Iron-deficiency anemia
  12. Hemoglobin of red blood cells of someone with sickle cell anemia differs from hemoglobin of normal blood cells. How?
    Hemoglobin has one different amino acid and that causes it to be folded incorrectly.
  13. _?_ anemia occurs due to a defect in bone marrow.
    Aplastic
  14. Should moving to a higher elevation increase, decrease or have no effect on the number of red blood cells one has?
    Increase
  15. What does erythrocyte sedimentation rate mean?
    Settling of red blood cells in a tube per hour.
  16. In what units is the erythrocyte sedimentation rate measured?
    mm/hr
  17. What is the normal erythrocyte sedimentation rate for:
    newborn babies?
    neonates to puberty?
    men under 50 years old?
    men over 50 years old?
    women under 50 years old?
    women over 50 years old?
    • 0-2 mm/hr
    • 3-13 mm/hr
    • <15 mm/hr
    • <20 mm/hr
    • <20 mm/hr
    • <30 mm/hr
  18. In some diseases, red blood cells clump so that there are a stack of red blood cells. This is called _?_.
    Rouleaux formation
  19. The stacking of red blood cells is due to the interaction of red blood cells with _?_ or _?_.
    fibrinogen or antibodies
  20. The erythrocyte sedimentation rate is a test used to follow what?
    Progression of some diseases
  21. The worse the disease gets, the _?_ erythrocyte sedimentation rate.
    higher
  22. The better the disease gets, the _?_ erythrocyte sedimentation rate.
    lower
  23. Based on the results you got when you did the erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) test, who had a higher ESR rate:
    A person with a myocardial infarction or a person with angina pectoris?
    A person with sickle cell anemia or a person with iron-deficiency anemia?
    • Myocardial infarction (40 mm/hr vs. 5 mm/hr)
    • Iron-deficiency anemia (30 mm/hr vs. 0 mm/hr)
  24. About how many hemoglobin molecules are there per erythrocyte?
    250 million
  25. How many oxygen molecules can 1 hemoglobin molecule carry?
    4
  26. Does oxygen bind to heme or to globin?
    Heme
  27. About what percent of oxygen transported in the blood is carried by hemoglobin?
    98.5%
  28. What is the normal hemoglobin level for an adult male?
    13.5-18g hemoglobin per 100 ml of blood
  29. What is the normal hemoglobin level for an adult female?
    12-16g hemoglobin per 100 ml of blood
  30. Would you expect someone with polycythemia or COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) to have an increase or decrease in hemoglobin levels?
    Increase
  31. Would you expect someone with anemia or severe hemorrhage to have an increase or decrease in hemoglobin levels?
    Decrease
  32. If a person has Type A blood, that person has what type of antigens on the surface of their red blood cells?
    A
  33. If a person has Type A blood, that person has which type of antibodies in his/her blood?

    A. anti-A
    B. anti-B
    C. both anti-A and anti-B
    D. neither anti-A and anti-B
    B.
  34. If a person has Type B blood, that person has what type of antigens on the surface of their red blood cells?
    B
  35. If a person has Type B blood, that person has which type of antibodies in his/her blood?

    A. anti-A
    B. anti-B
    C. both anti-A and anti-B
    D. neither anti-A and anti-B
    A.
  36. If a person has Type AB blood, that person has what type of antigens on the surface of their red blood cells?
    AB
  37. If a person has Type AB blood, that person has which type of antibodies in his/her blood?

    A. anti-A
    B. anti-B
    C. both anti-A and anti-B
    D. neither anti-A and anti-B
    D.
  38. If a person has Type O blood, that person has what type of antigens on the surface of their red blood cells?
    None
  39. If a person has Type O blood, that person has what type of antibodies in his/her blood?

    A. anti-A
    B. anti-B
    C. both anti-A and anti-B
    D. neither anti-A and anti-B
    C.
  40. When you do ABO blood grouping, you are testing for the type of _?_ a patient has.

    A. antigens
    B. antibodies
    C. both antigens and antibodies
    A.
  41. If a patient's blood agglutinates with both anti-A and anti-B, what is that patient's ABO blood type?
    AB
  42. If a patient's blood agglutinates with neither anti-A and anti-B, what is that patient's ABO blood type?
    O
  43. If a patient's blood agglutinates with anti-A but does not agglutinate with anti-B, what is that patient's ABO blood type?
    A
  44. If a patient's blood agglutinates with anti-B but does not agglutinate with anti-A, what is that patient's ABO blood type?
    B
  45. Which ABO blood type is often called the universal blood donor?
    O
  46. The universal donor refers to the transfusion of _?_.

    A. whole blood
    B. serum
    C. red blood cells
    D. white blood cells
    C.
  47. Which ABO blood type is often called the universal blood recipient?
    AB
  48. The universal recipient refers to the transfusion of _?_.

    A. whole blood
    B. serum
    C. red blood cells
    D. white blood cells
    C.
  49. What genotype(s) can result in Type A blood?
    AA, AO, or AB
  50. What genotype(s) can result in Type B blood?
    BB, BO, or AB
  51. What genotype(s) can result in Type AB blood?
    AB, AA, or BB
  52. What genotype(s) can result in Type O blood?
    AO, BO or OO
  53. It is possible for a woman with Type A blood and a man with Type B blood to have a child with Type O blood?
    Yes, as long as they each have an O in their genotypes (mom-AO and dad-BO). 
  54. It is possible for a woman with Type A blood and a man with Type AB blood to have a child with Type O blood?
    No
  55. Why is it dangerous to be transfused with the wrong type of blood?
    Receiving the wrong type of blood will cause the blood in the body to be agglutinated (destroyed).
  56. A and B antigens are heterophile antigens. What does that mean?
    They can be found in different tissues in more than one species.
  57. If a person has Rh+ blood, that person has what type of antigens on the surface of their red blood cells?
    D
  58. Is D antigen a heterophile antigen?
    Yes
  59. When you test to see if someone is Rh+ or Rh-, are you testing for the type of antigen on the person's red blood cells or the type of antibody in that person's serum?
    Type of antigen
  60. If a patient's blood agglutinates with anti-D, is that patient Rh+ or Rh-?
    Rh+
  61. If a patient's blood does not agglutinate with anti-D, is that patient Rh+ or Rh-?
    Rh-
  62. What genotype(s) can result in Rh- blood?
    Dd or dd
  63. It is possible for a woman with Rh+ blood and a man with Rh+ blood to have a child with Rh- blood?
    Yes, if they both have the genotype Dd.
  64. It is possible for a woman with Rh- blood and a man with Rh- blood to have a child with Rh+ blood?
    No
  65. Is cholesterol a protein, a carbohydrate or a steroid?
    Steroid
  66. From what 2 sources is cholesterol derived from?
    • Liver bile
    • Animal fats
  67. List the 2 positive aspects of cholesterol.
    • Steroid hormones
    • Vitamin D
  68. List the 2 negative aspects of cholesterol.
    • Heart attack
    • Stoke from clogged arteries
  69. Which is "good cholesterol"-HDL or LDL?
    HDL
  70. Why is "good cholesterol" good?
    Brings cholesterol to liver for export in bile.
  71. Which is "bad cholesterol"-HDL or LDL?
    LDL
  72. Why is "bad cholesterol" bad?
    Deposits cholesterol in artery walls.
  73. In what units are cholesterol levels expressed?
    mg/dl blood
  74. What is a "normal" cholesterol reading?
    <200 mg/dl blood
  75. What cholesterol readings would be considered borderline high?
    200-239 mg/dl blood
  76. What cholesterol readings would be considered high?
    240 mg/dl blood
  77. What word means high cholesterol readings?
    Hypercholesterolemia
  78. What word means low cholesterol readings?
    Hypocholesterolemia
  79. True or false: cholesterol readings of less than 100 mg/dl can be seen in some pathological conditions such as hyperthyroidism and malnutrition.
    True

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