US NAVY DIVE MANUAL CHAPTER 7 SCUBA DIVING OPERATIONS

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joesweeting
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262319
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US NAVY DIVE MANUAL CHAPTER 7 SCUBA DIVING OPERATIONS
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2014-02-23 18:59:08
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NAVY DIVE MANUAL SCUBA DIVER DIVING
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US NAVY DIVE MANUAL CHAPTER 7 SCUBA DIVING OPERATIONS
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  1. 7-2
    REQUIRED EQUIPMENT FOR SCUBA OPERATIONS
    • Face mask
    • Life preserver/buoyancy compensator.
    • Weight belt and weights as required.** 
    • Knife.**
    • Swim fins
    • Submersible pressure gauge or Reserve J-valve
    • Submersible wrist watch. Only one is required when diving in pairs with a buddy line.**
    • Depth gauge. ** 
    • Octopus. ***
  2. 7-2.2

    The basic open-circuit SCUBA components are:
    • Demand regulator assembly
    • One or more air cylinders 
    • Cylinder valve and manifold assembly 
    • Backpack or harness
  3. 7-2.2.2
    Each cylinder used in Navy operations must have identification symbols stamped into the shoulder
    • 1. DOT material specification, DOTSP6498 or DOT3AL service working pressure
    • 2. Serial number assigned by manufacturer
    • 3. Inspector’s stamp
    • 4. Month and year of initial qualification test
  4. 7-2.2.2.2
    Inspection Requirements
    Must be visually inspected at least annually and must be hydrostatically tested at least every five years
  5. 7-2.3.5
    The most useful knife has
    one sharp edge and one saw-toothed edge
  6. 7-3.1.5
    Signal Flares
    • MK 99 MOD 3 - These are day-or-night flares
    • The MK 131 is for day time distress signaling while the MK 132 is for night. 
    • The only difference between the MK 99 and the MK 131/132other than the fact that the MK 99 is a combined day/night signal flare which gives off yellow smoke and light, is that the MK 99 satisfies magnetic effect limits of  for explosive ordinance disposal (EOD) usage
  7. 7-3.1.7
    There are three basic types of lifelines:
    the tending line, the float line, and the buddy line
  8. 7-3.1.7
    A buddy line is ______ feet long
    6 to 10
  9. 7-4.3
    A diving unit can charge its own cylinders by one of two accepted methods
    (1) by cascading or transferring air from banks of large cylinders into the SCUBA tanks; or (2) by using a high-pressure air compressor
  10. 7-6.1
    Water Entry
    • Step-In Method: Front and rear
    • Roll Method: Front, side and rear
    • Beach entry
  11. 7-7.9
    When using externally powered tools with SCUBA, the diver must have
    voice communications with the Diving Supervisor.
  12. 7-8.2
    SCUBA diving is permitted under floating hulls; however
    a tending line to the SCUBA diver must be provided.
  13. 7-8.3
    Open-circuit SCUBA dives requiring decompression may be made only when considered absolutely necessary and authorized by the
    Commanding Officer or Officer in Charge (OIC).
  14. 7-8.3
    Guidance for SCUBA decompression diving.
    • The Diving Supervisor shall determine the required bottom time for each dive and air needed
    • If the air supply is not sufficient, a backup SCUBA will have to be made available to the divers. The backup unit can be strapped to a stage or tied off on a descent line which also has been marked to indicate the various decompression stops to be used.

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