sterile test 1

Card Set Information

Author:
coal
ID:
262924
Filename:
sterile test 1
Updated:
2014-02-21 10:26:35
Tags:
sterile test
Folders:
sterile test 1
Description:
sterile test 1
Show Answers:

Home > Flashcards > Print Preview

The flashcards below were created by user coal on FreezingBlue Flashcards. What would you like to do?


  1. ophthalmic specifications
    • sterile
    • free from particulate (if solution)
    • not necessarily pyrogen free
  2. different dosage forms of opthalmics
    • solutions
    • suspensions
    • ointments
    • gels
    • inserts
  3. what is taken into account when selecting the route for a parenteral
    • desired therapeutic effect
    • patient's condition
    • pharmaceutical characteristics of drug and dosage form
  4. what are 5 mechanisms to help with stability
    • preservation
    • buffering
    • viscosity
    • isotonicity
    • oxidation
  5. what is the required tonicity for the eye
    0.5-1.6% NaCl
  6. what are the labeling rules for volumes of parenteral and ophthalmics
    • parenterals - labeled is not acutual
    • ophthalmics - labeled is actual
  7. 2 ophthalmic gels
    • pilocarpine - carbopol 949
    • timoptic - gellan gum
  8. ophthalmic insert for dry eyes
    lacrisert
  9. ophthalmic insert for glaucoma
    ocusert
  10. routes of IV administration increasing in depth
    • intradermal
    • subcutaneous
    • intravenous
    • intramuscular
  11. volumes used for Intradermal (ID) and their uses
    • 0.1 mL
    • diagnostic studies, vaccines
    • very slow absorption
  12. 3 facts on Sub Q
    • volume not to exceed 1 mL
    • faster absorption that ID & oral but slower than IM & IV
    • continuous infusion at a very low flow rate (2-3 ml/hour)
  13. 3 facts about IM
    • volumes of 0.5 ml - 5 ml
    • slower effects than IV but of greater duration
    • oleaginous & suspensions
  14. 3 facts about IV
    • rapid onset
    • prolonged therapies
    • LVPs & SVPs
  15. 4 types of IV administration
    • direct injection
    • bolus
    • push
    • infusion
  16. 4 local complications of IV administration
    • hematoma
    • infiltration
    • phlebitis
    • site infection
  17. 6 systemic complications of IV administration
    • septicemia
    • circulatory overload
    • speed shock
    • air embolism
    • catheter embolism
    • pulmonary embolism
  18. indications for SVPs
    • insulin
    • antibiotics
    • analgesics
  19. 11 things required on an institutional label
    • pt name and ID
    • pt location
    • added drug names and amounts
    • admixture solution name
    • approximate final volume
    • time & date of scheduled administration
    • time & date of compounding
    • BUD if applicable
    • route
    • administration instructions (SIG)
  20. 10 requirements of a home care setting label
    • Rx #
    • date
    • DR
    • refilss
    • pt name & address
    • sig
    • name & amount/strength of drug added
    • name & volume of admixture solution
    • BUD
    • initial of maker & checker
    • name, address & telephone # of pharmacy
  21. a mandatory auxiliary label for home care settings
    "federal law prohibits the transfer of this drug to any person other than the patient for whom it was prescribed"
  22. 8 requirements of batch preparation
    • name of product/preparation
    • name or amount of drug added
    • admixture solution or diluent used
    • total volume of solution
    • route of administration
    • storage conditions
    • lot number or control number
    • BUD
  23. what must be stated on a syringe label
    intended rout of administration and type of injection
  24. 6 requirements of a syringe flag label
    • date and time prepared
    • drug name and amount
    • final volume
    • route of administration
    • BUD
    • makers initials
  25. what is required on the primary label for transportation of a syringe
    • Same as institution
    • pt name and ID
    • pt location
    • added drug names and amounts
    • admixture solution name
    • approximate final volume
    • time & date of scheduled administration
    • time & date of compounding
    • BUD if applicable
    • route
    • administration instructions (SIG)
  26. what 3 things are you considering when you select a parenteral container
    • characteristics of the solution or additives
    • volume of product
    • duration/frequency of administration
  27. what is type I pharmacopeial glass made of
    borosilicate glass
  28. what is type II pharmacopeial glass made of
    treated soda-lime (dealkalinized)
  29. what is type III pharmacopeial glass made of
    soda-lime (sand + soda ash[sodium carbonate] + limestone)
  30. how is PVC sterilized
    counter-pressure autoclave or by ethylene oxide
  31. how often do you change out an IV administration set
    48-72 hours
  32. what is the flow rate of a macrodrip
    10, 15, 20 gtt/ml
  33. what is the flow rate of a microdrip
    60 gtt/ml
  34. what does the USP set the standards of quality for
    • all prescriptions and OTC meds
    • dietary supplements
    • all other healthcare products manufactured and sold in the US
  35. the USP was created to prevent harm to pts from what 5 areas
    • microbial contamination
    • excessive bacterial endotoxins (pyrogen)
    • variability in intended strength
    • unintended chemical and physical contaminants
    • ingredients of inappropriate quality
  36. what are the 4 main responsibilities of compounding personnel
    • maintain high quality control of
    •   processes
    •   components
    •   environments
    •   skills & knowledge
  37. what criteria are used to determine risk levels
    microbial contamination (spores, endotoxins and microbes)

    chemical & physical contamination
  38. what are the ISO classifications measuring and what is ISO 5
    particulate matter in room air

    class 100, 3520 particles of 0.5mcm and larger
  39. low risk level CSPs
    no more than 3 commercially manufactured packages of sterile products used

    no more than 2 entries into any one sterile container or package

    ex. single volume transfers, reconstituting drugs, aseptic measuring & transfering
  40. medium risk level CSPs
    • multiple pooled sterile commercial products for multiple pts or 1 pt multiple times
    • complex aseptic manipulations
    • compounding over prolonged periods

    TPN, preps w/no bacteriostatic agent administered over several days (chemo, pain mgmt. via infusion)
  41. high risk level CSPs
    • preparation of non-sterile products
    • sterile ingredients exposed to < ISO 5 > 1 hour
    • lack of antimicrobial preservatives with more than 6 hour delay from compounding to sterilization
    • assumed but not verified (documentation) purity of components
    • improperly dressed personnel
  42. BUD's of different risk level products
  43. immediate use CSPs
    • only for emergencies (CPR, codes)
    • NOT to be stored
    • NOT include med & high risk CSPs
    • NOT include hazardous (chemo)
    • compounded in < ISO 5 conditions
  44. BUD's for single dose containers
    • 1 hr after opening in < ISO 5
    • 6 hr if > ISO 5
    • ampules = none
  45. BUD for multiple dose containers
    28 days unless otherwise specified by the manufacturer
  46. what conditions make a radiopharmaceutical low-risk
    • sterile components
    • in a closed container
    • 100 mL or less for single-dose containers
    • 30 mL or less for multiple dose containers
  47. what need to be on the label of an immediate use CSP
    • pt ID
    • names & amounts of all ingredients
    • initials of the person that compounded

What would you like to do?

Home > Flashcards > Print Preview