Ch 1 Educational Psychology

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Author:
keahi702
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264811
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Ch 1 Educational Psychology
Updated:
2014-03-03 21:44:05
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educational psychology woolfolk psy 307
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PSY 307
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Midterm Prep CH 1
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  1. Learning and Teaching Today (p.4-8)

    What are Classrooms like today?
    -(2003) 12% of people in the US are immigrants and 18% don't speak English at home.

    • -by 2050   
    •      -no majority race/ethnic group   
    •      -20% in poverty(2008-2009) 50% of      
    •       disabilities students learned in general
    •      classrooms.  

    -Increase diversity in classroom, but not in teachers-->white teachers are increasing
  2. Learning and Teaching Today (p.4-8)

    What is NCLB and what year did it start?
    No Child Left Behind Act of 2002
  3. Learning and Teaching Today (p.4-8)

    What is tested on NCLB?
    reading and math
  4. Learning and Teaching Today (p.4-8)

    What grades are required to test (NCLB)?
    grades 3 through 8 and once more in high school
  5. Learning and Teaching Today (p.4-8)

    Science in NCLB is tested when?
    In each grade span: elementary, middle, high school.
  6. Learning and Teaching Today (p.4-8)

    What's AYP and how is it used?
    Academic Yearly Progress to determine if student is becoming proficient in subjects tested.
  7. Learning and Teaching Today (p.4-8)

    What did the Obama Administration do on March 13, 2010
    released a A Blueprint for Reform: The Reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act to describe a vision for the reauthorization ofNCLB
  8. Learning and Teaching Today (p.4-8)

    What evidence is there that teachers make a difference?
    Several studies speak of the quality of the teacher-student relationship and success from kindergarten to 8th grade.
  9. Learning and Teaching Today (p.4-8)

    What two factors helped children with lower skills in math close the achievement gap?
    Instruction and positive relationships with teachers.
  10. What is Good Teaching? (p.8-12)

    What is good teaching? (5 aspects)
    good teachers are committed to their students.

    be able to deal with variety of abilities and challenges

    adapt instruction and assessment to student needs

    Take care of emotional needs like self-esteem and responsibility

    Teach living and learning in their classes
  11. What is Good Teaching? (p.8-12)

    How does differentiated instruction help?
    This is one way to go beyond accommodating learner differences to viewing diversity as strengths to build on.
  12. What is Good Teaching? (p.8-12)

    What is the basic idea of differentiated instruction?
    teachers take into account not just the subject taught but the students.
  13. What is Good Teaching? (p.8-12)

    How does differentiated instruction work?
    students work at different paces, sometimes with different learning options, and are assessed using indicators that fit their interests and needs.
  14. What is Good Teaching? (p.8-12)

    What do students all have in differentiated instruction?
    purpose, challenge, affirmation, power, and the chance to contribute
  15. What is Good Teaching? (p.8-12)

    How do teachers respond in differentiated instruction?
    invitation, investment, persistence, challenge, and reflection
  16. What is Good Teaching? (p.8-12)

    What are the concerns of beginning teachers?
    • Changes as they grow in ability.
    • -Maintaining discipline
    • -Motivation
    • -accommodating differences
    • -evaluating student work
    • -dealing with parents
    • -working with other teachers
  17. What is Good Teaching? (p.8-12)

    What are the concerns of experienced teachers?
    Professional growth and effectiveness in teaching a wide range of students
  18. The Role of Educational Psychology (p. 12-22)

    What is educational psychology?
    Goals: to understand and to improve teaching and the learning processes
  19. The Role of Educational Psychology (p. 12-22)

    What do Educational Psychologists develop?
    Knowledge and methods of psychology as well as other disciplines to study learning and teaching in everyday situations.
  20. The Role of Educational Psychology (p. 12-22)

    What are descriptive studies?
    Survey results, interview responses, samples of actual classroom dialogue, or records of class activities.
  21. The Role of Educational Psychology (p. 12-22)

    What are examples of descriptive studies?
    Ethnographic methods that involve studying naturally occurring events

    Case studies that investigate how teacher plans courses
  22. The Role of Educational Psychology (p. 12-22)

    What are correlational, experimental, and quasi-experimental studies?
    Correlation: both strength and the direction of a relationship between two events or measures. Closer to 1 the stronger the correlation

    Experimental: indicate cause and effect relationships and helps teachers implement change

    Quasi-experimental: Like experiements except groups aren't random. Look at specific classes that already exist.
  23. The Role of Educational Psychology (p. 12-22)

    What are single-subject and microgenetic studies?
    Single subject-examine effects on one person

    Microgenetic take many detailed observations of subjects to track progression of change
  24. The Role of Educational Psychology (p. 12-22)

    What is action research?
    Teachers schools make systematic observations or test out methods to improve teaching and learning
  25. The Role of Educational Psychology (p. 12-22)

    What is scientifically based research?
    Uses observations or experiments to gather valid and reliable data. Clearly described methods so it can be repeated by others. Reviewed by experts
  26. The Role of Educational Psychology (p. 12-22)

    Distinguish between principles and theories
    Principle: established relationship between two or more factors. Example: teaching strategy and achievement

    Theory: Offer perspectives for analyzing any situation. Theories are tested and the results are used to improve them.
  27. The Role of Educational Psychology (p. 12-22)

    What key factors support student learning?
    Two broad categories:

    • - student personal factors
    • - school and social contextual factors

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