LANGUAGE ARTS 11

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shockwave
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266289
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LANGUAGE ARTS 11
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2014-03-17 21:03:52
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LANGUAGE ARTS 11
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  1. A well-made argument was presented for negotiating a peaceful resolution.

    A well made argument was presented for negotiating a peaceful resolution.

    WHICH IS CORRECT?
    A well-made argument was presented for negotiating a peaceful resolution.

    Hyphenate two or more words that act as one idea in front OR BEFORE  of a noun.

    IF THEY FOLLOW THE NOUN, DO NOT HYPHENATE!
  2. The argument for negotiating a peaceful resolution was well-made.

    The argument for negotiating a peaceful resolution was well made.

    WHICH IS CORRECT?
    The argument for negotiating a peaceful resolution was well made.

    Do not hyphenate between words acting as one idea when they follow the noun they are modifying.

    Hyphenate two or more words that act as one idea in front OR BEFORE  of a noun.
  3. Just to be sure, I called three more D.V.M.s' offices.

    Just to be sure, I called three more D.V.M.'s offices.

    WHICH IS CORRECT?
    Just to be sure, I called three more D.V.M.s' offices.

    Write the plural of a word or abbreviation first; then use the apostrophe.
  4. The friendly-looking vet 
    A liberally sprinkled dose of humor 

    EXPLAIN WHY ONE IS HYPHENATED AND THE OTHER IS NOT. WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE?
    The friendly-looking vet examined 

    "Friendly" is an  adjective, not an adverb. It is acting as part of one idea,"friendly-looking," in front of a noun so hyphenate it.

    • A liberally sprinkled dose of humor 
    • Do not hyphenate "-ly" adverbs even when the next word is part of one idea.


  5. The alarm clock went off at four o'clock.

    The alarm clock went off at four o'clock p.m.

    WHICH IS CORRECT?
    The alarm clock went off at four o'clock.

    ONLY USE O'CLOCK WITH THE HOUR, NOTHING ELSE.

    WRITE OUT THE HOUR, NO NUMBERS.

    NO A.M. OR P.M. 

    • DON'T CAP THE "O".
    • DON'T CAP THE HOUR.
  6. T OR F
    USE A COMMA TO SET OFF APPOSITIVES.

    AND WHAT THE HELL ARE APPOSITIVES?
    An appositive is a noun or noun phrase that renames a nearby noun. Appositives offer nonessential information.

    Nonrestrictive appositives are set off with commas; restrictive appositives are not.

    1. Alexander Pope, the Restoration poet, is famous for his monologues. (appositive)

    2. The poet Pope is famous for his monologues. (no appositive)

    3. The New York Jets, the underdogs, surprised everyone by winning the Super Bowl. (appositive)
  7. Not only the students but also their instructor ________ been called to the principal's office.

    have
    has
    HAS (SINGULAR)

    With paired conjunctions such as either ... or and not only ... but also, the subject closer to the verb -- in this case, the singular 'instructor' -- determines whether the verb will be singular or plural.

    When a singular and plural subject are connected by either/or or neither/nor, put the plural subject last and use a plural verb.
  8. T OR F
    Two singular subjects connected by either/or or neither/nor require a singular verb.
    • TRUE.
    • Neither Juan nor Carmen is available.

    Either Kiana or Casey is helping today with stage decorations.

    • EXCEPT When I is one of the two subjects 
    • put it second and follow it with the singular verb am.
    • Neither she nor I am going to the festival.
  9. T OR F
    When either and neither are subjects, they always take singular verbs.
    TRUE

    • Neither of them is available to speak right now.
    • Either of us is capable of doing the job.
  10. HOW DO YOU FORM  Comparative and Superlative Adjectives WITH MOST One-syllable adjectives?

    AND WHATS THE EXCEPTION?
    • –er for the comparative form
    • –est for the superlative.

    • Mary is taller than Max.
    • Mary is the tallest of all the students.

    • If the one-syllable adjective ends with an e, just add –r for the comparative form and –st for the superlative form.
    • Max is wiser than his brother.
    • Max is the wisest person I know.
  11. HOW DO YOU FORM Comparative/Superlative Forms FROM One-Syllable Adjective Ending with a Single Consonant with a Single Vowel before It? 
    EX: BIG
    If the one-syllable adjective ends with a single consonant with a vowel before it, double the consonant and add –er for the comparative form; and double the consonant and add –est for the superlative form.

    • My dog is bigger than your dog.
    • My dog is the biggest of all the dogs in the neighborhood.
  12. With most two-syllable AND three-syllable adjectives, you form the comparative/superlative  adjective forms HOW?

    WHAT ARE THE TWO EXCEPTIONS?
    MORE AND MOST

    If the two-syllable adjectives ends with –y, change the y to i and add –er for the comparative form. For the superlative form change the y to i and add –est.

    • happy happier happiest
    • angry angrier angriest

    • Two-syllable adjectives ending in: 
    • –er, -le, or –ow
    • Take –er and –est to form the comparative and superlative forms.

    • narrow narrower narrowest
    • gentle gentler gentlest

  13. comparative/superlative OF BAD
    bad   worse   worst
  14. Was or Were?
    HOW DO YOU USE THEM?
    • WAS SINGULAR 
    • WERE PLURAL 

  15. My brother pawned his guitar to pay his rent. If only I _______ enough money, I would have paid his rent for him.
    A. had had
    B. would have had
    • A.
    • This describes a past unreal event, so (taking a step backward from the past) we need the past perfect: "had had." The option "would have had" is impossible because we can't use the modal "would" in both the "if" clause and the result clause.
  16. This is a perfect spring day. If it __________, I would stay home and study.
    A. rains
    B. will rain
    C. rained
    For present unreal events, we put the verb in the condition clause one step back in time -- into the past: "rained".
  17. I wish my brother _________ here.  
    A. were 
    B. was
    • A.
    • In expressions of wishing, use the subjunctive. For "to be," the past subjunctive is always were.
    • This is true even in the first and third-person singular, where you might expect was. 
    •  
  18. Find the principal parts of the verb "be" by filling in the blanks below.
    I ____________ here now. (present tense)
    I ____________ here in the past (past tense)
    I have ___________ here every day. (past participle)
    • am here now. (present tense)
    • was here in the past. (past tense)
    • I have been here every day. (past participle)
  19. Find the principal parts of the verb "go" by filling in the blanks below.
    I ____________ now. (present tense)
    I ____________ in the past (past tense)
    I have ___________ every day. (past participle)
    • go now. (present tense)
    • went in the past. (past tense)
    • I have gone every day. (past participle)
  20. DIFFERENCE BETWEEN I AND ME
    • I with other subjective pronouns  we, he, she, you, and they, when the pronoun is the subject of a verb:
    • He went to bed.
    • We waited for the bus.
    • Clare and I are going for a coffee.

    • ME objective pronouns us,him, her, you and them. 
    • when the pronoun is the object of a verb OR PREPOSITION

    • Danny thanked them.
    • The dog followed John and me to the door.
    • (object of the verb follows)

    Rose spent the day with Jake and me.
  21. Define Absolute phrase
    Absolute phrases are optional in sentences, i.e., they can be removed without damaging the grammatical integrity of the sentence.

    Since absolute phrases are optional in the sentence, they are often set off from the sentence with commas or, less often, with dashes. 

    An absolute phrase cannot contain a FINITE VERB.(a verb which has a subject and shows tense. In short, it is a verb being a verb (i.e., a doing word))

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