Diabetes Drugs 2

Card Set Information

Author:
kyleannkelsey
ID:
266507
Filename:
Diabetes Drugs 2
Updated:
2014-03-15 00:43:28
Tags:
Diabetes Drugs
Folders:
Diabetes Drugs 2
Description:
Diabetes Drugs 2
Show Answers:

Home > Flashcards > Print Preview

The flashcards below were created by user kyleannkelsey on FreezingBlue Flashcards. What would you like to do?


  1. Are Sulfonylureas or Meglitinides given alone or in combo?
    Both
  2. How is Biguanide – Metformin/Glucophage taken?
    Oral
  3. How is Biguanide – Metformin/Glucophage metabolized ?
    Not really - Little or none
  4. How is Biguanide – Metformin/Glucophage excreted?
    Renally
  5. What is the MOA for Biguanide – Metformin/Glucophage?
    • Stimulates AMP activated protein kinase = the master regulator of metabolism
    • - Decreases hepatic glucose production
    • - Enhances action of insulin in peripheral tissues
    • - Decreases absorption of glucose from GI
  6. What are the Adverse Effects of Metformine?
    • G.I. – nausea, diarrhea, anorexia
    • Lactic acidosis
    • CI: impaired renal function, liver dysfunction and CHF
  7. Is Metformin used alone or in combo?
    Both
  8. Does Metformin cause excessive hypoglycemia?
    No
  9. Does Metformin cause Weight loss?
    Yes
  10. Does Metformin cause a decreases triglycerides?
    Yes
  11. What arethe Thiacolidinediones (TZDs or Glitazones)?
    Pioglitizone/actos (main) and Rosiglitazone/Avandia
  12. What is the MOA of TZDs?
    • Activate peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPAR γ) in the nucleus
    • Transcribe genes associated with lipid steal and insulin lowering of plasma glucose
    • May inhibit hepatic gluconeogenisis
  13. What are the adverse effects of TZDs?
    • Avoid with liver dysfunction and HF (see fluid retention)
    • Fluid retention, edema
    • Weight gain
    • Avoid with heart failure
    • Risk of bladder cancer
    • Bone fractures
  14. Should you use TZDs alone or in combo?
    Both
  15. Do TZDs cause excessive hypoglycemia?
    No
  16. What effect do TZDs have on lipids/cholesterol?
    Increase HDL and decrease TG
  17. Why is Rosiglitazone not used as much as Pioglitazone?
    More adverse effects
  18. What are the alpha glucose inhibitors/glucose absorption inhibitors?
    Acarbose and Miglitol
  19. Are Acarbose and Miglitol/Glucose absorption inhibitors used alone or in combo?
    Combo, not as effective
  20. What is the MOA for Acarbose and Miglitol/Glucose absorption inhibitors?
    • Inhibits pancreatic alpha-amylase and intestinal alpha-glucosidase
    • Slows digestion of complex carbs and decreases peak PPG
  21. What are the adverse effects of Acarbose and Miglitol /Glucose absorption inhibitors?
    • GI effects (avoid in intestinal disease)
    • Elevation of liver enzymes
  22. Are Acarbose and Miglitol /Glucose absorption inhibitors used alone or in combo?
    Combo
  23. When should you take Acarbose and Miglitol /Glucose absorption inhibitors?
    With meals
  24. Are Acarbose and Miglitol /Glucose absorption inhibitors absorbed well?
    No, act in GI
  25. What ar eth Incretin Mimetics?
    • Exenitide (Byetta)
    • Liraglutide (Victoza)
  26. What is the MOA of Exenitide (Byetta)and Liraglutide (Victoza)/ Incretin Mimetics?
    Synthetic derivatives and mimics of GLP (glucoagon like protein-1)
  27. How are Exenitide (Byetta)and Liraglutide (Victoza)/ Incretin Mimetics administered?
    SQ
  28. What are the adverse effects of Exenitide (Byetta)and Liraglutide (Victoza)/ Incretin Mimetics?
    N/V, diarrhea, Renal impairment, risk of thyroid C cell cancer and pancreatitis
  29. What are Exenitide (Byetta)and Liraglutide (Victoza)/ Incretin Mimetics used for?
    Type II DM and Weight loss
  30. What is the MOA of Exenitide (Byetta)and Liraglutide (Victoza)/ Incretin Mimetics?
    • Decreased stomach emptying
    • Fullness
    • Decreased appetitie
    • Enhance insulin secretion w/ glucose
    • Reduced Glucagon secretion
    • May protect pancreas
  31. What are the Dipeptidyl Peptidase-IV Inhibitors (Gliptins)?
    • Sitagliptin (Januvia)
    • Saxagliptin (Onglyza)
    • Linagliptin (Tradjenta)
  32. Dipeptidyl Peptidase-IV Inhibitors (Gliptins) Sitagliptin (Januvia), Saxagliptin (Onglyza), Linagliptin (Tradjenta) are given by what route?
    Oral
  33. What is the MOA for Dipeptidyl Peptidase-IV Inhibitors (Gliptins) Sitagliptin (Januvia), Saxagliptin (Onglyza), Linagliptin (Tradjenta)?
    Inhibits Dipeptidyl Peptidase-4 (DPP-4), increases endogenous incretins (DPP-4 breaks down endogenous incretins)
  34. What are the adverse effects of Dipeptidyl Peptidase-IV Inhibitors (Gliptins) Sitagliptin (Januvia), Saxagliptin (Onglyza), Linagliptin (Tradjenta)?
    • Naopharyngitis
    • Upper respiratory infections
    • HA
    • Pancreatitis
  35. Are Dipeptidyl Peptidase-IV Inhibitors (Gliptins) Sitagliptin (Januvia), Saxagliptin (Onglyza), Linagliptin (Tradjenta) used alone or in combo?
    Both
  36. Other than Incretin mimic what drugs also act in the Incretin system?
    • Dipeptidyl Peptidase-IV Inhibitors:
    • (Gliptins) Sitagliptin (Januvia), Saxagliptin (Onglyza), Linagliptin (Tradjenta)
  37. Why is Pramlinitide (Symlin) only used with insulin?
    Improves effectiveness of insulin by reducing Glucagon release
  38. What are the adverse effects of Pramlintide?
    • Excessive hypoglycemia
    • Gastroparesis
    • N/V
  39. What is the MOA of Pramlitide?
    • Mimics Amylin
    • Decrease postprandial glucagon
    • Delay gastric emptying
    • Decreases appetite/weight loss
  40. What is the route of administration for Pramlintide (Symlin)?
    SQ (b/c it is a peptide)
  41. What is the Amylin analogue?
    Pramlintide
  42. What drugs are Na-glucose co-transporter inhibitors?
    Canagliflozin (Invokana), Dapagliflozin (Forxiga)
  43. What is the route of administration for Canagliflozin (Invokana) and Dapagliflozin (Forxiga)?
    Oral
  44. What are the adverse effects of Canagliflozin (Invokana) and Dapagliflozin (Forxiga)?
    • Vaginal yeast infections and UTIs
    • Polyuria
    • Caution in renal failure
  45. Are Canagliflozin (Invokana) and Dapagliflozin (Forxiga) use alone or in combo?
    Usually in combo, but both
  46. What is the MOA of Canagliflozin (Invokana) and Dapagliflozin (Forxiga)?
    • Inhibits Na+-glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2) in the renal proximal tubule
    • Inhibits glucose reabsorption, increases glucose excretion, lowers plasma glucose

What would you like to do?

Home > Flashcards > Print Preview