TAP READING 1

Card Set Information

Author:
shockwave
ID:
267781
Filename:
TAP READING 1
Updated:
2014-03-24 21:54:41
Tags:
TAP READING
Folders:
TAP READING 1
Description:
TAP READING 1
Show Answers:

Home > Flashcards > Print Preview

The flashcards below were created by user shockwave on FreezingBlue Flashcards. What would you like to do?


  1. Faulty cause and effect
    The premise used as the cause is not sufficient to guarantee the conclusion (effect).

    For Example: "She passed the test because she wore her lucky charm" has "she wore her lucky charm" as a premise and "she passed the test" as an unwarranted conclusion.
  2. The premise used as the cause is not sufficient to guarantee the conclusion (effect)
    Faulty cause and effect:  The premise used as the cause is not sufficient to guarantee the conclusion (effect).

    • For Example: "She passed the test because she wore her lucky charm" has "she wore her lucky charm" as a premise and "she passed the test" as an unwarranted conclusion.
  3. The conclusion is an illogical result of the facts stated.
    • Non sequitur: The conclusion is an illogical result of the facts stated.
    • For Example: "People who get cancer drank milk as children" illogically makes a connection between "people who get cancer" and "people who drank milk as children."
  4. Non sequitur
    • The conclusion is an illogical result of the facts stated.
    • For Example: "People who get cancer drank milk as children" illogically makes a connection between "people who get cancer" and "people who drank milk as children."
  5.  The writer makes an assertion of fact that has not been established.
    • Begging the question: The writer makes an assertion of fact that has not been established.
    • For Example: George Washington was a communist.
  6. Begging the question
    • Begging the question: The writer makes an assertion of fact that has not been established.
    • For Example: George Washington was a communist.
  7. Circular logic
    Circular logic: A premise is rephrased as the conclusion which means the argument has gone nowhere.

    • For Example: The bookstore ran out of texts for the course because there are too many students in the class.
  8. Hasty generalization
    The reasoning or argument is extended beyond the specific evidence cited.

    • For Example: All federal politicians are corrupt.
  9. The reasoning or argument is extended beyond the specific evidence cited.
    Hasty generalization: The reasoning or argument is extended beyond the specific evidence cited.

    • For Example: All federal politicians are corrupt.
  10. Either/Or
    The reader is expected to choose one of two extreme choices while offered no other possibilities.


    • For Example: Thinking people will choose either democracy or communism.
  11. Insufficient or inappropriate comparisons are made in an attempt to prove a point.
    Faulty analogy: Insufficient or inappropriate comparisons are made in an attempt to prove a point.



    • For Example: That politician is a flea hopping around on the issues.
  12. Argument to the person (argumentum ad hominem)
    The passage attacks a person rather than the person’s opinions or issues.

    • For Example: This instructor can’t be trusted because he was a hippie at one time.
  13. Argument to the people (argumentum ad populum)
    • Appeals are made to the feelings or emotions of the reader rather than the other side of the argument.
    • For Example: When you see the American flag passing by, you won't think that it may pass out of existence if you vote for me.
  14. Argument to the person (argumentum ad hominem)

    VS

     Argument to the people (argumentum ad populum)
     Argument to the person (argumentum ad hominem): The passage attacks a person rather than the person’s opinions or issues.

    Argument to the people (argumentum ad populum): Appeals are made to the feelings or emotions of the reader rather than the other side of the argument.
  15.  Bandwagon appeal
    •  Bandwagon appeal: The passage claims that everyone believes or does whatever his/her argument is.
    • For Example: Everyone agrees that Cadillacs are great this year and now is the time to buy one.
  16.  Red herring
    •  Red herring: Irrelevant is used in an attempt to divert attention from a weak argument.
    • For Example: The voters will want to vote against Joe Brown because they remember what happened in the ’60s.
  17. Irrelevant is used in an attempt to divert attention from a weak argument.
    • Red herring: Irrelevant is used in an attempt to divert attention from a weak argument.
    • For Example: The voters will want to vote against Joe Brown because they remember what happened in the ’60s.

What would you like to do?

Home > Flashcards > Print Preview