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Mod1FlashCard
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2014-03-29 23:59:24
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MS1 Module 1:Introduction to information systems
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  1. Describe the Value Principle of Information
    • ♦The value of Information is directly linked to how it helps decision makers achieve the organization's goals.
    • ♦Information is power and it is most powerful when it enables strategic decision making.
    • ♦Information must be delivered to the right person, at the right time with as little effort as possible.
    • ♦It is important to know how computers (hardware, software, databases, and telecommunications) operate, and also how individuals, groups, and the organization use data and information. So many of today’s business decisions must be supported by information, and with that information being all around in various forms (in databases, on the Web, or cloud-based), it is imperative to both use and analyze the information, and to understand how and where it originated.
    • (Reference-MIS Chapter1 p.3; Module 1.1 p.11)
  2. INFORMATION SYSTEM
    • A set of interrelated components that collect(input), manipulate(process), store, and disseminate(output) data and information and provide a corrective reaction (feedback) mechanism to meet an objective.
    • (Reference-MIS Chapter1 p.5 & 10; Module1.2 p.13)
  3. A set of interrelated components that collect, manipulate, store, and disseminate data and information and provide a feedback mechanism to meet an objective.
    • INFORMATION SYSTEM
    • (Reference-MIS Chapter1 p.5)
  4. INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY (IT), as defined by the Information Technology Association of America (ITAA)
    • ♦“the study, design, development, implementation, support or management of computer-based information systems, particularly software applications and computer hardware.”
    • ♦deals with the use of computer hardware and software to convert, store, protect, process, transmit, and securely retrieve information.
    • (Reference-Module1.1 Chapter1 p.11)
  5. ♦“the study, design, development, implementation, support or management of computer-based information systems, particularly software applications and computer hardware.”
    ♦deals with the use of computer hardware and software to convert, store, protect, process, transmit, and securely retrieve information.
    • INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY (IT), as defined by the Information Technology Association of America (ITAA)
    • (Reference-Module1.1 Chapter1 p.11)
  6. Discuss why it is important to study and understand Information Systems (IS)/Information Technology (IT)?
    • 1)IS are used in almost every imaginable profession and company everyday.
    • 2)The feedback mechanism provided helps individuals/organizations achieve their goals.
    • 3)Knowing the potential of information systems and putting this knowledge to work can help individuals enjoy a successful career and help companies reach their goals.
    • (Reference-MIS Chapter1 p.4-5)
  7. Discuss how accountants are affected by the developments of IT/IS?
    • ♦Information systems collect business data that accountants analyze, and business plans and decisions are made based on such analyses.
    • ♦Accountants use information systems to record financial transactions, budgets, and forecasts, and to prepare financial reports and file tax returns.
    • ♦Accountants are concerned not only with the collection and processing of information, but also with its integrity, confidentiality and protection. They are often expected to give professional feedback on the adequacy of the information systems, so it is essential that they have adequate knowledge in this area.
    • (Reference-Module1.1 p.11)
  8. Enumerate the different ways that Information systems can improve our lives?
    • 1)speed up processes;
    • 2)automate redundant tasks;
    • 3)reduce information overload;
    • 4)present information in graphical, easy-to-5)understand formats;
    • 6)standardize processes;
    • 7)provide monitoring mechanisms;
    • 8)provide entertainment opportunities;
    • 9)enhance communication.
    • (Reference-Module1.2) p.11)
  9. DATA
    • ♦Raw facts such as an employee number, total hours worked in a week, inventory parts number, or sales orders.
    • ♦Consists of facts that represent real-world elements.
    • (Reference-MIS Chapter1 p.6; Module1.1 p.12)
  10. ♦Raw facts such as an employee number, total hours worked in a week, inventory parts number, or sales orders.
    ♦Consists of facts that represent real-world elements.
    • DATA
    • (Reference-MIS Chapter1 p.6; Module1.1. p.12)
  11. INFORMATION
    • ♦A collection of facts organized & processed so that they have additional value to decision makers beyond the value of the individual facts.
    • (Reference-MIS Chapter1 p.6)
  12. ♦A collection of facts organized & processed so that they have additional value to decision makers beyond the value of the individual facts.
    • INFORMATION
    • (Reference-MIS Chapter1 p.6)
  13. Name the TYPES OF DATA and how it is represented by
    • 1) Alphanumeric data - numbers, letters, and other characters
    • 2) Image data - graphic images and pictures
    • 3) Audio data - sound, noise, or tones
    • 4) Video data - moving images or pictures
    • (Reference-MIS Chapter1 p.6)
  14. ERM
    • Electronic Records Management
    • (Reference-MIS Chapter1 p.6)
  15. How does the relationships among data create information? Explain and site example.
    • Defining and organizing relationship among data creates information. Consider data as pieces of railroad tracks where each piece has limited inherent value as a single object. However, if a relationship is defined among the pieces of track, they gain value. By arranging the pieces in a certain way, a railroad layout begins to emerge. Data and information work the same way. Rules and relationships can be set up to organize data into useful valuable information.
    • (Reference-MIS Chapter1 p.6)
  16. PROCESS
    • ♦Turning data into information.
    • ♦A set of logically related tasks performed to achieve a defined outcome.
    • (Reference-MIS Chapter1 p.7; Module1.1 p.12)
  17. Turning data into information.
    A set of logically related tasks performed to achieve a defined outcome.
    • PROCESS
    • (Reference-MIS Chapter1 p.7; MODULE 1.1 P.12)
  18. KNOWLEDGE
    • ♦This is required in the process of defining relationships among data to create useful information.
    • ♦The awareness and understanding of a set of information and ways that information can be made useful to support a specific task or reach a decision.
    • ♦Understanding the relationships in information.
    • ♦The ability to use processes to create information
    • (Reference-MIS Chapter1 p.7; Module1.1 p.12)
  19. ♦This is required in the process of defining relationships among data to create useful information.
    ♦The awareness and understanding of a set of information and ways that information can be made useful to support a specific task or reach a decision.
    ♦Understanding the relationships in information.
    ♦The ability to use processes to create information
    • KNOWLEDGE
    • (Reference-MIS Chapter1 p.7; Module1.1 p.12)
  20. Knowledge Workers (KW)
    • These are people who create, use, and disseminate knowledge and are usually professionals in science, engineering, business, and other areas.
    • (Reference-MIS Chapter1 p.7)
  21. These are people who create, use, and disseminate knowledge and are usually professionals in science, engineering, business, and other areas.
    • Knowledge Workers (KW)
    • (Reference-MIS Chapter1 p.7)
  22. Knowledge Management System (KMS)
    • ♦An organized collection of people, procedures, software, databases, and devices used to create, store, and use the organization's knowledge and experience.
    • ♦It's success is linked to how easy it is to use and how satisfied users are with it.
    • (Reference-MIS Chapter1 p.7)
  23. ♦An organized collection of people, procedures, software, databases, and devices used to create, store, and use the organization's knowledge and experience.
    ♦It's success is linked to how easy it is to use and how satisfied users are with it.
    • Knowledge Management System (KMS)
    • (Reference-MIS Chapter1 p.7)
  24. Desribe the process of Transforming Data into Information
    • DATA
    • The transformation process (applying knowledge by selecting, organizing, and manipulating data)
    • INFORMATION
    • (Reference-MIS Chapter1 p.7)
  25. How is data different from information? Information from knowledge?
    • Data is the raw material from which information is composed. Information includes a context for the data.
    • Knowledge is an awareness of how to apply the information.
    • (Reference-MIS Chapter1.1 p.5)
  26. CHARACTERISTICS OF VALUABLE INFORMATION
    • AACEFReReSeSiTiVe
    • Accessible
    • Accurate
    • Complete
    • Economical
    • Reliable
    • Relevant
    • Secure
    • Simple
    • Timely
    • Verifiable
    • (Reference-MIS Chapter1 p.8)
  27. ACCESSIBLE
    • A characteristic of a valuable information where it can be easily accessible by/available to authorized users so they can obtain it in the right format and at the right time to meet their needs.
    • (Reference-MIS Chapter1 p.8)
  28. A characteristic of a valuable information where it can be easily accessible by/available to authorized users so they can obtain it in the right format and at the right time to meet their needs.
    • ACCESSIBLE
    • (Reference-MIS Chapter1 p.8)
  29. A characteristic of a valuable information where it is error free.
    ACCURATE   (Reference-MIS Chapter1 p.8)
  30. ACCURATE
    • A characteristic of a valuable information where it is error free.
    • (Reference-MIS Chapter1 p.8)
  31. Garbage In-Garbage Out (GIGO)
    • The term used when innaccurate information generated because inaccurate data is fed into the transformation process.
    • (Reference-MIS Chapter1 p.8)
  32. The term used when innaccurate information generated because inaccurate data is fed into the transformation process.
    • Garbage In-Garbage Out (GIGO)
    • (Reference-MIS Chapter1 p.8)
  33. COMPLETE
    • A characteristic of a valuable information where it contains all the important facts. Example investment report not including all important costs is not complete.
    • (Reference-MIS Chapter1 p.8)
  34. A characteristic of a valuable information where it contains all the important facts. Example investment report not including all important costs is not complete.
    • COMPLETE
    • (Reference-MIS Chapter1 p.8)
  35. ECONOMICAL
    • A characteristic of a valuable information where it is relatively not costly to produce. Decision makers must always balance the value of information with the cost of producing it.
    • (Reference-MIS Chapter1 p.8)
  36. A characteristic of a valuable information where it is relatively not costly to produce. Decision makers must always balance the value of information with the cost of producing it.
    • ECONOMICAL
    • (Reference-MIS Chapter1 p.8)
  37. FLEXIBLE
    • ♦A characteristic of a valuable information where it can be used for a variety of purposes.
    • ♦Example: Information on inventory on hand can be used by a sales representative(in closing a sale),a production manager (to know if more inventory is needed), and financial executives (to determine the total value of investment on inventory).
    • (Reference-MIS Chapter1 p.8)
  38. ♦A characteristic of a valuable information where it can be used for a variety of purposes. 
    ♦Example: Information on inventory on hand can be used by a sales representative(in closing a sale),a production manager (to know if more inventory is needed), and financial executives (to determine the total value of investment on inventory).
    • FLEXIBLE
    • (Reference-MIS Chapter1 p.8)
  39. RELEVANT
    • A characteristic of a valuable information where it is very important and significant to the decision maker.
    • (Reference-MIS Chapter1 p.8)
  40. A characteristic of a valuable information where it is very important and significant to the decision maker.
    • RELEVANT
    • (Reference-MIS Chapter1 p.8)
  41. RELIABLE
    • A characteristic of a valuable information where it can be considered trustworthy by users. Reliability depends on the reliability of the data-collection method & the source of information. A rumor without solid proof is unreliable.
    • (Reference-MIS Chapter1 p.8)
  42. A characteristic of a valuable information where it can be considered trustworthy by users. Reliability depends on the reliability of the data-collection method & the source of information. A rumor without solid proof is unreliable.
    • RELIABLE
    • (Reference-MIS Chapter1 p.8)
  43. SECURE
    • A valuable information should be safe and invulnerable from the access by unauthorized users.
    • (Reference-MIS Chapter1 p.8)
  44. A valuable information should be safe and invulnerable from the access by unauthorized users.
    • SECURE
    • (Reference-MIS Chapter1 p.8)
  45. SIMPLE
    • ♦A valuable information should not be complex.
    • ♦Sophisticated, detailed & too much information can cause overload on the part of decision makers and hence, making them unable to determine what is really important.
    • (Reference-MIS Chapter1 p.8)
  46. ♦A valuable information should not be complex.
    ♦Sophisticated, detailed & too much information can cause overload on the part of decision makers and hence, making them unable to determine what is really important.
    • SIMPLE
    • (Reference-MIS Chapter1 p.8)
  47. TIMELY
    • A valuable information must be delivered when it is needed the most.
    • (Reference-MIS Chapter1 p.8)
  48. A valuable information must be delivered when it is needed the most.
    • TIMELY
    • (Reference-MIS Chapter1 p.8)
  49. VERIFIABLE
    • A characteristic of a valuable information where decision makers can check it to make sure it is correct, perhaps by checking many sources for the same information.
    • (Reference-MIS Chapter1 p.8)
  50. A characteristic of a valuable information where decision makers can check it to make sure it is correct, perhaps by checking many sources for the same information.
    • VERIFIABLE
    • (Reference-MIS Chapter1 p.8)
  51. SYSTEM
    • A set of elements or components that interact to accomplish goals.
    • (Reference-MIS Chapter1 p.9)
  52. A set of elements or components that interact to accomplish goals.
    • SYSTEM
    • (Reference-MIS Chapter1 p.9)
  53. COMPONENTS OF A SYSTEM and give an example
    • Example: A car wash
    • INPUT - dirty car, water, cleaning materials, time, energy, skills and knowledge to operate cleaning machinery
    • PROCESSING MECHANISM - consist of selecting cleaning options (wash only, wash with wax, wash with wax and hand dry etc.)
    • OUTPUT - a very clean car!
    • FEEDBACK MECHANISM - assessment of the result/ outcome or how clean the car
    • (Reference-MIS Chapter1 p.9)
  54. SYSTEM MODELS
    • These are designs used to enhance understanding and improve systems.
    • (Reference-Module1.1 p.12)
  55. These are designs used to enhance understanding and improve systems.
    • SYSTEM MODELS
    • (Reference-Module1.1 p.12)
  56. CLASSIFICATION OF SYSTEM MODELS
    • Narrative
    • Physical
    • Schematic - are most often used as development tools and include program flowcharts, entity-relationship diagrams, and data-flow diagrams
    • Arithmetical
    • (Reference-Module1.1 p.12)
  57. TWO WAYS TO MEASURE SYSTEM PERFORMANCE
    • Efficiency
    • Effectiveness
    • (Reference-MIS Chapter1 p.9)
  58. EFFICIENCY
    • A unit cost measure of what is produced divided by what is consumed. [PRODUCED / CONSUMED] * 100
    • Means doing something properly.
    • A relative term used to compare systems.
    • (Reference-MIS Chapter1 p.9)
  59. A unit cost measure of what is produced divided by what is consumed. 

    [PRODUCED / CONSUMED] * 100

    Means doing something properly.A relative term used to compare systems.
    • EFFICIENCY
    • (Reference-MIS Chapter1 p.9)
  60. EFFECTIVENESS
    • A measure of the extent to which a system achieves its goals; it can be computed by dividing the goals actually achieved by the total of the stated goals. [ACTUAL GOALS ACHIEVED / TOTAL STATED GOALS] * 100
    • How well it meets its goals.
    • Doing something with the best use of available resources.
    • More important!
    • (Reference-MIS Chapter1 p.9; Module 1.1 p.12 )
  61. A measure of the extent to which a system achieves its goals; it can be computed by dividing the goals actually achieved by the total of the stated goals. [ACTUAL GOALS ACHIEVED / TOTAL STATED GOALS] * 100
    How well it meets its goals.
    Doing something with the best use of available resources.
    More important!
    • EFFECTIVENESS
    • (Reference-MIS Chapter1 p.9; Module 1.1 p.12 )
  62. SYSTEM PERFORMANCE STANDARD
    • A specific objective of the system. Example: Marketing Campaign quota-sell $100,000cars/sales rep; manufacturing process-produce no more than 1% defective parts.
    • After standards are established, system performance is measured and compared with the standard. Variances from the standard are determinants of system performance.
    • (Reference-MIS Chapter1 p.10)
  63. A specific objective of the system. Example: Marketing Campaign quota-sell $100,000cars/sales rep; manufacturing process-produce no more than 1% defective parts.
    After standards are established, system performance is measured and compared with the standard. Variances from the standard are determinants of system performance.
    • SYSTEM PERFORMANCE STANDARD
    • (Reference-MIS Chapter1 p.10)
  64. COMPONENTS OF AN INFORMATION SYSTEM (IS)
    • IPOF
    • Input
    • Processing
    • Output
    • Feedback
    • (Reference-MIS Chapter1 p.11)
  65. INPUT
    • An IS component/element which refers to the activity of gathering and capturing raw data.
    • Example: number of hours coolected before paycheques are calculated; student grades submitted before compiling summary of grades and sent to students
    • (Reference-MIS Chapter1 p.12)
  66. question>An IS component/element which refers to the activity of gathering and capturing raw data.
    • Example: number of hours coolected before paycheques are calculated; student grades submitted before compiling summary of grades and sent to students
    • INPUT
    • (Reference-MIS Chapter1 p.12)
  67. PROCESSING
    • An IS component/element which means converting or transforming data into useful outputs.
    • Example: making calculation, comparing data, taking alternative actions, storing data for future use.
    • (Reference-MIS Chapter1 p.11)
  68. An IS component/element which means converting or transforming data into useful outputs.
    Example: making calculation, comparing data, taking alternative actions, storing data for future use.
    • PROCESSING
    • (Reference-MIS Chapter1 p.11)
  69. OUTPUT
    • An IS component/element which involves the production of useful information, usually in the form of documents and reports. Example: paycheques for employyes, reports for managers, and information supplied to stockholders, banks, government agencies, and other groups.
    • Sometimes output for one system can be an input for another. Example: output of a system that processes sales orders can be used as input to a customer billing system.
    • (Reference-MIS Chapter1 p.11)
  70. An IS component/element which involves the production of useful information, usually in the form of documents and reports. Example: paycheques for employyes, reports for managers, and information supplied to stockholders, banks, government agencies, and other groups.
    Sometimes output for one system can be an input for another. Example: output of a system that processes sales orders can be used as input to a customer billing system.
    • OUTPUT
    • (Reference-MIS Chapter1 p.11)
  71. FEEDBACK
    • An IS component/element refering to information from the system or output that is used to make changes to input or processing activities. Example: errors or problems might make it necessary to correct input data or change a process.
    • This is important for managers and decision makers because they can use it to check and correct input or the process should outcomes are unfavorable.
    • (Reference-MIS Chapter1 p.11)
  72. An IS component/element refering to information from the system or output that is used to make changes to input or processing activities. Example: errors or problems might make it necessary to correct input data or change a process.
    This is important for managers and decision makers because they can use it to check and correct input or the process should outcomes are unfavorable
    • FEEDBACK
    • (Reference-MIS Chapter1 p.11)
  73. FORECASTING
    • Predicting future events to avoid problems
    • (Reference-MIS Chapter1 p.11)
  74. Predicting future events to avoid problems
    • FORECASTING
    • (Reference-MIS Chapter1 p.11)
  75. MAJOR TYPES OF INFORMATION SYSTEM (IS)
    • Manual System
    • Technology-based (computer) systems
    • (Reference-Module1.2 p.13)
  76. COMPUTER BASED INFORMATION SYSTEM (CBIS)
    • A single set of hardware, software, databases, telecommunications, people, and procedures that are configured to collect, manipulate, store, and process data into information.
    • (Reference-MIS Chapter1 p.8)
  77. A single set of hardware, software, databases, telecommunications, people, and procedures that are configured to collect, manipulate, store, and process data into information.
    • COMPUTER BASED INFORMATION SYSTEM (CBIS)
    • (Reference-MIS Chapter1 p.8)
  78. TECHNOLOGY INFRASTRUCTURE
    • All the hardware, software, databases, telecommunications, people, and procedures that are configured to collect, manipulate, store, and process data into information.
    • A set of shared IS resources that form the foundation of each computer-based information system.
    • (Reference-MIS Chapter1 p.12)
  79. All the hardware, software, databases, telecommunications, people, and procedures that are configured to collect, manipulate, store, and process data into information.
    A set of shared IS resources that form the foundation of each computer-based information system.
    • TECHNOLOGY INFRASTRUCTURE
    • (Reference-MIS Chapter1 p.12)
  80. COMPONENTS OF A COMPUTER-BASED INFORMATION SYSTEM
    • HARDWARE
    • SOFTWARE
    • DATABASE
    • TELECOMMUNICATIONS
    • PEOPLE
    • PROCEDURES
    • (Reference-MIS Chapter1 p.13)
  81. HARDWARE
    • Computer Equipment/Devices used to perform input, processing, and output activities.
    • Input Devices - keyboards, mice/other pointing devices, automatic scanning devices, magnetic ink character reading equipment
    • Processing Devices - computer chips that contain the cental processing unit and main memory
    • Output Devices - printers, monitor, speakers
    • (Reference-MIS Chapter 1 p.13)
  82. Computer Equipment/Devices used to perform input, processing, and output activities.
    Input Devices - keyboards, mice/other pointing devices, automatic scanning devices, magnetic ink character reading equipment
    Processing Devices - computer chips that contain the cental processing unit and main memory
    Output Devices - printers, monitor, speakers
    • HARDWARE
    • (Reference-MIS Chapter 1 p.13)
  83. SOFTWARE
    • The computer Programs that govern the operation of the computer.
    • These programs allow a computer to process payroll, send bills to customers, and provide managers with information to increase profits, reduce costs, and provide better customer service.
    • (Reference-MIS Chapter1 p.13)
  84. The computer Programs that govern the operation of the computer.
    These programs allow a computer to process payroll, send bills to customers, and provide managers with information to increase profits, reduce costs, and provide better customer service.
    • SOFTWARE
    • (Reference-MIS Chapter1 p.13)
  85. Name 2 types of Software/Computer Programs. Define its function and give examples to each.
    • System Software- controls the basic computer operations including start-up and printing; Runs the computer. Example: Microsoft Windows Vista; Windows 7
    • Applications Software - allows user to accomplish specific tasks, including word processing or tabulating numbers; Do tasks desired by users. Example: Microsoft Office 2010
    • (Reference-MIS Chapter1 p.13; Module1.2 p.13)
  86. DATABASE
    • An organized collection of facts and information, typically consisting of two or more related data files.
    • Examples: facts and information on customers, employees, inventory, competitors' sales, online purchases, and much more.
    • (Reference-MIS Chapter1 p.13)
  87. An organized collection of facts and information, typically consisting of two or more related data files.
    Examples: facts and information on customers, employees, inventory, competitors' sales, online purchases, and much more.
    • DATABASE
    • (Reference-MIS Chapter1 p.13)
  88. TELECOMMUNICATIONS
    • The electronic transmission of signals for communications; enables organizations to carry out their processes and tasks through effective computer networks.
    • Can take place through wires or wireless and satellite transmissions
    • (Reference-MIS Chapter1 p.13)
  89. The electronic transmission of signals for communications; enables organizations to carry out their processes and tasks through effective computer networks.
    Can take place through wires or wireless and satellite transmissions
    • TELECOMMUNICATIONS
    • (Reference-MIS Chapter1 p.13)
  90. NETWORKS
    • Computers and equipment that are connected in a building, around the country, or around the world to enable electronic communications.
    • (Reference-MIS Chapter1 p.13)
  91. CATEGORIES OF TELECOMMUNICATION
    • Local area networks (LAN)
    • Wide area networks (WAN)
    • Internet
    • Intranets
    • Extranets
    • (Reference-Module1.2 p.14)
  92. LOCAL AREA NETWORKS (LAN)
    • connect computers and equipment (including other computers such as servers that hold large files of data) within an organization or one department.
    • (Reference-Module1.2 p.14)
  93. connect computers and equipment (including other computers such as servers that hold large files of data) within an organization or one department.
    • LOCAL AREA NETWORKS (LAN)
    • (Reference-Module1.2 p.14)
  94. WIDE AREA NETWORKS (WAN)
    • connect computers and equipment over greater distances.
    • (Reference-Module1.2 p.14)
  95. connect computers and equipment over greater distances.
    • WIDE AREA NETWORKS (WAN)
    • (Reference-Module1.2 p.14)
  96. INTERNETs
    • The world's largest computer network, consisting of thousands of interconnected networks, all freely exchanging information.
    • Interconnects numerous computers and networks and allows them to communicate with each other.
    • (Reference-Module1.2 p.14)
  97. The world's largest computer network, consisting of thousands of interconnected networks, all freely exchanging information.
    Interconnects numerous computers and networks and allows them to communicate with each other.
    • INTERNETs
    • (Reference-Module1.2 p.14)
  98. INTRANETs
    • An internal network based on Web technologies that allows people within an organization to exchange information and work on projects.
    • use networks to connect people within an organization
    • (Reference-Module1.2 p.15; Chapter1 p.14)
  99. An internal network based on Web technologies that allows people within an organization to exchange information and work on projects.
    use networks to connect people within an organization
    • INTRANETs
    • (Reference-Module1.2 p.15; Chapter1 p.14)
  100. EXTRANETS
    • A network based on Web technologies that allows selected outsiders, such as business partners and customers, to access authorized resources of a company's intranet. Example Fedex site.
    • allow outside persons and organizations to communicate with the organization for select purposes
    • (Reference-Module1.2 p.15)
  101. A network based on Web technologies that allows selected outsiders, such as business partners and customers, to access authorized resources of a company's intranet. Example Fedex site.
    allow outside persons and organizations to communicate with the organization for select purposes
    • EXTRANETS
    • (Reference-Module1.2 p.15)
  102. PEOPLE
    • The human resources is considered the most important element in most computer-based information systems.
    • They make the difference between success and failure for most organizations.
    • They include the users of the system (without whom the system has no reason to exist) and the information systems personnel, who develop, manage, operate, and maintain the system.
    • (Reference-Module 1.2 p.14)
  103. The human resources is considered the most important element in most computer-based information systems.
    They make the difference between success and failure for most organizations.
    They include the users of the system (without whom the system has no reason to exist) and the information systems personnel, who develop, manage, operate, and maintain the system.
    • PEOPLE
    • (Reference-Module 1.2 p.14)
  104. PROCEDURES
    • The strategies, policies, methods, and rules for using a CBIS
    • (Reference-MIS Chapter1 p.13)
  105. The strategies, policies, methods, and rules for using a CBIS
    • PROCEDURES
    • (Reference-MIS Chapter1 p.13)
  106. CLOUD COMPUTING
    • The concept that allows people to get the information they need from the Internet (referred to as the "cloud") instead of from desktop or corporate computers.
    • (Reference-MIS Chapter1 p.13)
  107. The concept that allows people to get the information they need from the Internet (referred to as the "cloud") instead of from desktop or corporate computers.
    • CLOUD COMPUTING
    • (Reference-MIS Chapter1 p.13)
  108. 2 KINDS OF CLOUD COMPUTING
    • Public Cloud Computing : applications available to everyone
    • Private Cloud Computing: applications available only to corporate employees and managers.
    • (Reference-MIS Chapter1 p.13)
  109. WORLD WIDE WEB (W.W.W.) or THE WEB
    • is a network of links on the internet to documents containing text, graphics, video, and sound.
    • (Reference-MIS Chapter1 p.14)
  110. is a network of links on the internet to documents containing text, graphics, video, and sound.
    • WORLD WIDE WEB (W.W.W.) or THE WEB
    • (Reference-MIS Chapter1 p.14)
  111. What is the term called to the tens of thousand of special computers that controlled the information about documents and provided access to them
    • Web Servers
    • (Reference-MIS Chapter1 p.14)
  112. Web Servers
    • the term called to the tens of thousand of special computers that controlled the information about documents and provided access to them
    • (Reference-MIS Chapter1 p.14)

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