Chemistry Weak Acids Weak Bases and STRONG

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Author:
jfes11
ID:
268724
Filename:
Chemistry Weak Acids Weak Bases and STRONG
Updated:
2014-04-02 09:00:16
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Chemistry
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Chemistry
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Chemistry
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  1. Formic

    HCOOH
    Weak Acid
  2. Acetic

    CH3COOH
    Weak Acid
  3. Trichloroacetic

    CCl3COOH
    Weak Acid
  4. Hydrofluric

    HF
    Weak Acid
  5. Hydrocyanic

    HCN
    Weak Acid
  6. Hydrogen Sulfide

    H2S
    Weak Acid
  7. Water

    H20
    Weak Acid
  8. Conjugate acids of Weak Bases

    NH4+
    Weak Acid
  9. Ammonia

    NH3
    Weak Bases
  10. Trimethyl Ammonia

    N(CH3)3
    Weak Acid
  11. Pyridine
    C5H5N
  12. Ammonium Hydroxide

    NH4OH
    Weak Acid
  13. Water

    H20
    Weak Acid
  14. HS- ion

    HS-
    Weak Acid
  15. Conjugate bases of weak acids

    HCOO-
    Weak Acid
  16. Hydrochloric Acid

    HCl
    Strong Acid
  17. Nitric Acid

    HNO3
    Strong Acid
  18. Sulfuric Acid

    H2SO4
    Strong Acid
  19. Hydrobromic Acid

    HBr
    Strong Acid
  20. Hydroiodic Acid

    HI
    Strong Acid
  21. HCIO4
    Perchloric Acid
  22. Strong Bases
    Strong bases are bases which completely dissociate in water into the cation and OH- (hydroxide ion). The hydroxides of the Group I and Group II metals usually are considered to be strong bases. Here is a list of the most common strong bases.
  23. lithium hydroxide

    LiOH
    Strong Bases
  24. sodium hydroxide

    NaOH
    Strong Bases
  25. potassium hydroxide

    KOH
    Strong Bases
  26. rubidium hydroxide  

    RbOH
    Strong Bases
  27. Strong Acids
    These are the strong acids. What makes them 'strong' is that they completely dissociate into their ions (H+ and an anion) when they are mixed with water. Any other acid is a weak acid. There are only six strong acids, so you might want to commit the list of strong acids to memory
  28. Weak Acids & Bases
    Unlike strong acids/bases, weak acids and weak bases do not completely dissociate (separate into ions) at equilibrium in water, so calculating the pH of these solutions requires consideration of a unique ionization constant and equilibrium concentrations. Although this is more difficult than calculating the pH of a strong acid or base solution, most biochemically important acids and bases are considered weak, and so it is very useful to understand how to calculate the pH of these substances. The same basic method can be used to determine the pH of aqueous solutions of many different weak acids and bases.
  29. Conjugate acid and base
    A conjugate acid, within the Brønsted–Lowry theory, is a species formed by the reception of a proton (H+), by a base - in other words, the base with a hydrogen ion added to it - while a conjugate base is formed by the removal of a proton from an acid: the conjugate base of an acid is that acid with a hydrogen ion removed.[1]Visually, this can be represented as:A conjugate acid of the base → Base + H+ A conjugate base of the acid → Acid − H+ The Brønsted-Lowry model is based on the idea that acids are proton donors and bases are proton acceptors; the conjugate base or conjugate acid is merely what is left after an acid has lost a proton or a base has gained a proton, respectively.
  30. pKa
    pKa is the negative base-10 logarithm of the acid dissociation constant of a solution. pKa = -log10Ka The lower the pKa value, the stronger the acid.

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