C17 IAC - Departure Planning & Checklist.txt

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C17 IAC - Departure Planning & Checklist.txt
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2014-04-02 16:59:44
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C17 IAC Ride Two GK Altus Departure Planning
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C17 IAC - Departure Planning (Ride 2). Maj Livie
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  1. Can you take off with weather below approach and landing minimums? (2C-17 V3, 6.17)
    Yes, but a departure alternate is required.
  2. What is the minimum weather required for takeoff? (2C-17 V3, table 6.3)
    Operational: 1000 RVR (300 meters) Mission priorities dictate, dual RVR (one on each end), centerline lighting is operational, crew is fully qualified.

    All Others: 1600 RVR (490 meters) If more than one RVR readout is available, all of them must be greater than 1600

    Note: If no RVR readout is available visibility must be 1/2 mile (800 meters)
  3. When is a departure alternate required? (2C-17 V3, 6.19)
    When ceiling or visibility is below landing minimums for the lowest suitable approach (at departure field).

    Do not use CAT II minimums.
  4. When filing a departure alternate, if the aircraft loses an engine on departure it must be able to maintain what altitude to the alternate OEI? (2C-17 V3, 6.19.2)
    The MEA or MOCA
  5. What weather is required at a departure alternate within 30 minutes flying time? (2C-17 V3, 6.19.2.1)
    Must be equal to or greater than published approach and remain so until 1 hour after takeoff but in no case lower than 200-1/2 (RVR 2400)
  6. What weather is required at a departure alternate within 2 hours flying time? (2C-17 V3, 6.19.2.1)
    Must be at least 500-1 above the lowest compatible published approach but not less than 600-2 for precision and 800-2 non-precision and must be forecast to remain so for 1 hour after ETA at the alternate.
  7. When do you file two alternates? (2C17-V3, 6.20)
    • 1) Forecast visibility is less than published for a precision approach
    • 2) Ceiling or visibility is less than published for all other approaches
    • 3) Winds are out of limits corrected for RCR
  8. When do you file an alternate regardless of forecast weather? (2C17-V3, 6.20.2)
    When departure or destination is outside CONUS, except for intra-theater flights that do not exceed 3-hours.

    PHNL, PHIK, EGUN, ETAR and ETAD do not require an alternate.

    Also, OCONUS to CONUS flight do not require an alternate. FCIF 13-069
  9. What is the definition of Minimum IFR Altitude (MIA)? (11-202V3, pg79)
    The lowest safe altitude permitted to be flown under IFR.

    Normally, this is the lowest published IFR altitude (MEA, MOCA, OROCA, ORTCA) for a given area not including any portion of an IAP.
  10. What is the definition of OROCA? (11-202V3, pg80)
    Off-Route Obstacle Clearance Altitude. Provides 1,000 foot obstruction clearance (2,000 feet in mountainous terrain) within the United States.

    Does not guarantee signal coverage from ground-based navaids, ATC or communications.
  11. What is the definition of ORTCA? (11-202V3, pg80)
    Off-Route Terrain Clearance Altitude.

    Provides a 3,000 foot buffer from terrain.

    Does not guarantee signal coverage from ground-based navaids, ATC or communications. This altitude is used on en route charts covering areas outside the United States.
  12. What is the definition of MEA? (Wikipedia, not defined in our pubs)
    The lowest published altitude between radio navigation fixes that assures acceptable navigational signal coverage and meets obstacle clearance requirements between those fixes.
  13. What is the definition of MRA? (Wikipedia, not defined in our pubs)
    Minimum Reception Altitude.

    The lowest altitude on an airway segment where an aircraft can be assured of receiving signals from navigation aids.
  14. What is the definition of MOCA? (Wikipedia, not defined in our pubs)
    Minimum Obstacle Clearance Altitude.

    The lowest published altitude in effect between fixes on VOR airways or route segments that meets obstacle clearance requirements (1,000 feet or 2,000 feet mountainous terrain) for the entire route segment.

    Within the United States, this altitude also assures acceptable navigational signal coverage only within 22 nm of a VOR. It is always lower than the MEA.
  15. What is the definition of MCA? (Wikipedia, not defined in our pubs)
    The lowest altitude at which a navigational fix can be crossed when entering or continuing along an airway that will allow an aircraft to clear all obstacles while carrying out a normal climb to the required minimum en route IFR altitude (MEA) of the airway in question beyond the fix.
  16. What is the definition of MSA? (11-217V1 6.5.4.1.7)
    The minimum altitude that provides at least 1,000 feet of obstacle clearance within 25NM of the facility.

    It does not guarantee NAVAID reception.
  17. What is the definition of ESA? (11-217V1 6.5.4.1.7)
    An altitude that provides 1,000 feet of obstacle clearance (2,000 feet in mountainous terrain) within 100NM of the facility.
  18. What are the methods of departing IFR? (11-202V3 8.12.3)
    If an airfield has an instrument approach you may depart by:

    • 1. Published ODP (textual or graphics to include RTRL and VCOA). You may only fly a VCOA if you have MDS specific training and an RTRL may only be used if it's published as an ODP (11-217 7.4).
    • 2. Standard Instrument Departure (SID)
    • 3. Specific ATC Departure Instructions. Must be issued with a climb gradient or must meet the highest gradient published for that runway.
    • 4. Diverse Departures
    • 5. Special MAJCOM CERT
  19. What climb rate is required on departure regardless of the departure method selected? (11-202V3 8.12.10)
    200 FT/NM
  20. What is a low close-in obstacle? (11-202V3 pg78)
    Obstacles in the Initial Climb Area that require an excessive climb gradient to a climb-to-altitude of 200 feet or less above the DER elevation.

    They are published VIA NOTAM, on the SID chart or in the front of the approach book.
  21. In addition to complying with the published climb gradient, the PIC must also ensure the aircraft can vertically clear what? (11-202V3 8.12.10.1)
    Low close-in obstacles.
  22. When is the only time you can use non-standard takeoff minimums? (11-202V3 8.12.10.2.2)
    When the aircraft is capable of being at or above the published non-standard takeoff minima ceiling requirement prior to crossing the DER with OEI and continue a normal climb profile that will clear all obstacles.
  23. What are your options if you can't meet the required 4-Engine climb gradient? (11-202V3 8.12.10.3)
    • 1. Reduce weight
    • 2. Delay mission until conditions improve
    • 3. If the mission justifies the risk the pilot may depart any location, in VMC, without regard to the IFR climb gradient.
  24. What climb rate must you meet with OEI? (11-202V3 8.12.10.5)
    The published climb gradient or 200FT/NM (if no higher gradient published) to a MEA
  25. What are your options if you can't meet the required 3-Engine climb gradient? (11-202V3 8.12.10.5)
    • 1. Reduce weight
    • 2. Delay mission until conditions improve
    • 3. Change Runway or Departure
    • 4. On an operational mission with a MAJCOM approved SDP available use the SDP
    • 5. If no SDP available, subtract 48 FT/NM from the climb gradient but not less than 152 FT/NM
    • 6. If the mission justifies the risk the pilot may depart any location, in VMC, without regard to the IFR climb gradient.

    * When using a method to reduce the required climb gradient the aircraft must still meet the published gradient with 4 engines operating
  26. Where is the One Engine Inoperative Decision Tree located? (11-202V3 Attach 3)
    11-202V3 Attachment 3 or 11-217V1 Paragraph 7.7
  27. Where can you deconfigure and reduce power when departing IMC? (-1 2-91)
    1. When using the standard departure profile the flaps are retracted at Vmfr and at or above 1,000 AFE. Power should be reduced to MCT or INT at slat retract speed.

    2. When using the alternate departure profile the flaps are retracted at Vmfr and at or above 1,000 AFE. Maintain Vmfr until above the required climb gradient altitude. Power should be reduced to MCT or INT at slat retract speed.
  28. Where can you deconfigure and reduce power when departing VMC? (-1 2-91)
    The acceleration and tactical climb profiles do not guarantee any minimum climb capability.

    The aircrew must ensure that all climb restriction are met.

    If any doubts exist concerning climb capability or terrain clearance, us the Standard or Alternate departure profile.
  29. What is a SDP? (11-217V1 7.5.1.2)
    Special Departure Procedures are MDS-specific, commercially designed and published procedures, that require MAJCOM training and certification before use.

    The purpose of the SDP is to allow takeoff at an increased gross weight. Often this is done by providing the pilot and "escape" routing to use in the event of a thrust loss of takeoff.

    PICs must understand a SDP delivers as little as zero feet of obstruction clearance and must be flown exactly as published.
  30. How do we use an SDP? (Departure Planning Checklist)
    By following the "Entering an SDP in the mission computer" portion of the departure planning checklist.

    Pilots must ensure the aircraft weight does not exceed the maximum gross weight published for the procedure.

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