C17 IAC - Tactical Arrivals.txt

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PokerPilot
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268973
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C17 IAC - Tactical Arrivals.txt
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2014-04-02 16:52:28
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C17 IAC Tactical Arrivals Altus
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C17 IAC - Tactical Arrivals (Ride 2). Maj Livie
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  1. What are some advantages of high-speed arrivals? (3-3; 5.5.1)
    • Increased maneuverability
    • Decreased exposure time
  2. What are some disadvantages of high-speed arrivals? (3-3, 5.5.1)
    • Increased turn radius
    • Increased noise and heat signatures
    • Decreased margin of errors
  3. What are some advantages of Shallow arrivals? (3-3, table 5.4)
    • Reduced detection capability due to LOS limitations
    • Initiated within close proximity to the airfield
    • Flexible ground track (Course Reversal (CR))
    • Constant turning with airspeed changes make the aircraft an uncooperative target (CR)
    • Easy to adapt in either direction (Beam (B))
    • Universally familiar to controllers and aircrew (overhead (O))
    • Offers built-in deconfliction for missed approaches (overhead (O))
    • Overflying runway provides LZ acquisition (CR, B, O)
    • Ingress airspeed is maintained until over the airfield (CR, B, O)
  4. What are some disadvantages of Shallow arrivals? (3-3, table 5.4)
    • Aircraft operates close to the ground
    • Aircraft is exposed to small arms
    • Aggressive maneuvering may require more experience
    • Navigation and LZ acquisition more difficult
    • Maneuvering at low altitude and high airspeed may result in overshoot (CR)
    • May create significant wing flash (CR)
    • Requires considerable maneuvering with decaying airspeed close to the ground (CR, B)
    • LZ acquisition may occur very late in the approach (B)
    • Possible loss of position awareness while making the reversal/break-turn (CR, B, O)
    • High ingress speeds may result in wider displacement following break turn (O)
    • Large formations may become spread out past the desired break/perch point and protected airspace (O)
  5. What are some types of shallow arrivals? (3-3, table 5.4)
    • Straight-in (SI)
    • 90/270 course reversal (CR)
    • Beam (B)
    • Overhead (O)
  6. What are some types of steep arrivals? (3-3, table 5.4)
    • Straight-in (SI)
    • Spiral (SP)
  7. What are some disadvantages of steep arrivals? (3-3, table 5.4)
    • Daylight operations may result in significant contrast of aircraft against sky
    • Energy management from a steep arrival to a normal landing glide path may be complicated
    • Aircraft could transit entire MANPAD WEZ
    • Predictable ground track (SP)
    • Time from initiating the maneuver to touchdown can limit DZ traffic flow (SP)
    • Potential threats could be overflown multiple times (SP)
    • Difficult to execute consistently and requires a high level of proficiency (SI)
    • Lack of turns only allow energy dissipation in one dimension (SI)
  8. What are some advantages of steep arrivals? (3-3, table 5.4)
    • Reduced exposure time to threats if flown with rapid descent
    • Reduced acoustic/heat signature at idle power
    • Allows for higher en route altitudes (fuel and time savings)
    • Allows for excellent visibility of DZ
    • Capitalizes on protected airspace (SP)
    • Suitable for descent into areas of high terrain (SP)
    • Requires minimum maneuvering (SI)
    • Can be modified to a high-downwind or base turn in event of runway change (SI)
  9. Name some different slow down techniques. (3-3, 5.5)
    • "Noodle" slow down
    • Low-altitude slow down
    • Panel slow down
  10. Describe the "noodle" slowdown technique. (3-3, 5.5.1)
    • 1. Program a FAF altitude and glide slope in the MC approach page
    • 2. When the noodle touches the FAF begin slowdown
    • 3. Configure on speed and maintain level slowdown until the FAF
    • 4. This technique is conservative especially at low altitudes and airspeed (below 280)
  11. Describe the low altitude slowdown rule of thumb. (3-3, table 5.1)
    • 1. Distance required to slow down is 1% of ground speed
    • 2. Add 1NM if above 280 Kts
    • 3. Add 1NM if above 450,000 pounds
    • 4. The distance given is to slow down to approach speed, configuring on speed
  12. Describe the panel slowdown technique? (3-3, table 5.5.1)
    • 1. At 10,000 feet it takes 1NM to slow 20 knots using a panel slow down
    • 2. At 20,000 feet it takes 1NM to slow 10 knots using a panel slow down
    • 3. Table 5.2 in the 3-3 has a complete listing of rates at different altitudes
  13. What do we mean by a 1 to 1 descent?
    Descending 1,000 feet in 1 NM
  14. Describe the "noodle" slowdown technique? (3-3, table 5.5.1)
    • 1. The a FAF altitude and glide slope in the MC approach page
    • 2. When the noodle touches the FAF begin slowdown
    • 3. Configure on speed and maintain level slowdown until the FAF
    • 4. This technique is conservative especially at low altitudes and airspeed (below 280)
  15. List some configurations and airspeeds that give a 1-to-1 descent? (3-3, table 5.3)
    • 1. 230 knots, slats, half flaps, speed break (950 ft/nm)
    • 2. 180 knots, slats, half flaps, speed break (950 ft/nm)
    • 3. Slats, Full Flaps, Gear, DLC (950ft/nm)
  16. How do you update energy state during the descent? (3-3, table 5.5.1)
    • 1. For an enroute descent using 1500-2000VVI, triple the altitude to lose and that is the number of miles needed to make the descent
    • 2. Once inside three times your altitude to lose a 500ft/nm (travel two miles for every 1,000 loss) can be made by extended slats and descending at 230kts.
    • 3. Transition to a 1-to-1 descent once altitude to lose equals distance remaining to loose the altitude
    • 4. Once inside a 1-to-1 descent, ask for vectors or a 360
    • 5. Program multiple slow-down points along anticipated route of flight. Program altitudes and airspeeds into the MC. Use PFP to update progress.
  17. How do you determine latest touchdown point? (3-3, 5.5.5.5.3.1)
    Reduce the runway available on the landing told page until GND ROLL is displayed.

    That distance is the minimum runway needed to stop.
  18. What is a good technique for determining the back of the assault zone? (3-3, table 5.5.1)
    The aircraft is traveling at approx 175ft/sec and the gear is 66 feet behind the pilot.

    If the pilot passes the back of the zone there is only 1/3 of a second until the wheels are out of the zone.

    Go around if the pilots are past the end of the zone.

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