Orthopedic Tests: Knee and Thigh

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Author:
mandelyn
ID:
273769
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Orthopedic Tests: Knee and Thigh
Updated:
2014-05-13 00:51:17
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MBP UCMT Massage
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Description:
Orthopedic Tests for the knee and thigh
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  1. Anterior Drawer Test
    • Explanation: The client is supine on table with hip flexed to 45o, the knee flexed to 90o, and the client's foot flat on table.  Client's foot is stabilized by anchoring toes beneath practitioner's thigh.  The practitioner places both hands around posterior side of proximal tibia and give a firm anterior pull on tibia.
    • Tests: ACL
  2. Lachman Test
    • Explanation: The client is supine on table.  Test can be performed with knee in straight extension or partially flexed.  The client's anterior distal femur is stabilized with one hand while the other hand is placed behind the proximal tibia.  A firm anterior pull is applied to tibia.
    • Tests: ACL
  3. Posterior Drawer Test
    • Explanation: Client is supine on table with hip flexed to 45o, knee flexed to 90o, and client's foot flat on table.  The client's foot is stabilized by anchoring toes beneath practitioner's thigh.  The practitioner places both hands around tibia and give a firm push.
    • Tests: PCL
  4. Gravity Drawer Test
    • Explanation: Client is supine on table with hip flexed to 45o, knee flexed to 90o, and foot flat on table.  Practitioner views the tibial tuberosity to see if it drops posteriorly.
    • Tests: PCL
  5. Godfrey Test
    • Explanation: Client is in supine on table with hip flexed 90o, the knee flexed to 90o, and the practitioner holds the client's foot.  The practitioner examines the level of the tibial tuberosity to see if it drops posteriorly.
    • Tests: PCL
  6. Valgus Stress Test
    • Explanation: The client is in supine on table, practitioner stabilizes the distal medial tibia with one hand, while applying moderate valgus force to the lateral knee with the other.
    • Tests: MCL
  7. Varus Stress Test
    • Explanation: The client is supine on table, practitioner stabilizes the lateral distal tibial with one hand, while applying moderate varus force to the medial knee with the other.
    • Tests: LCL
  8. Patellar Mobility Test
    • Explanation: With the client seated or in supine on the table with the knee extended and relaxed, the practitioner pushes the edge of the patella, attempting to move it medially and laterally.
    • Tests: tracking mobility patellar
  9. Clarke's Sign
    • Explanation: The client is in supine on table with knee fully extended.  The practitioner places one hand over the distal end of the suprapatellar tendon, just above the superior margin of patella.  The client then slowly contracts the quads until a full contraction is achieved.
    • Tests: Patellar cartilage/tendon
  10. Modified Ober Test
    • Explanation: With the client side-lying on table positioned diagonally so the leg and thigh of the upper side can drop off the back edge of table, the practitioner brings client's leg into abduction and hyperextension, then slowly lowers it as far as it will go.
    • Tests: tightness in gluteus medius and TFL
  11. Noble Compression Test
    • Explanation: The client is supine with hip flexed and knee extended.  The practitioner applies moderate pressure to ITB just proximal to lateral epicondyle with one or both thumbs.  Once pressure is applied, the client or practitioner flexes the client's knee.  If pain is felt around 30o of flexion there is a good chance for ITB friction syndrome
    • Tests: ITB friction syndrome
  12. Apley's Compression Test
    • Explanation: With client in prone with knee flexed to 90o, the practitioner grasps client's ankle with one hand and uses the other hand to press down toward table.  The practitioner then gently rotates the tibia through its full range of motion both medially and laterally.  Note any pain then continue to distraction test.
    • Tests: differentiate between ligamentous and meniscal pain
  13. Apley's Distraction Test
    • Explanation: With client in prone with knee flexed to 90o the practitioner places a knee on the client's thigh and lifts the lower leg straight up from table.  Once leg is lifted the practitioner takes tibia through its full range of motion both medially and laterally.
    • Tests: differentiate between ligamentous and meniscal pain
  14. McMurray's Test
    • Explanation: Client is supine on table with knee fully flexed.  The practitioner has one hand cupping the client's heel and the other grasping the medial and lateral joint line of the knee.  To test the lateral meniscus the tibia is medially rotated as far as possible and the knee is fully extended.  To test the medial meniscus the tibia is laterally rotated as far as possible and the knee is fully extended.  If pain, popping, or snapping sensations occur during either of these motions, suspect meniscus damage.
    • Tests: meniscus

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