LANGUAGE ARTS 15

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shockwave
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275702
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LANGUAGE ARTS 15
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2014-06-03 22:52:24
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LANGUAGE ARTS 15
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  1. Four years _______ a long time to spend away from your friends and family.

    IS OR ARE
    IS 

    The quantity of 'four years' here is meant to be taken as a whole, as one quantity, so the verb should be singular.
  2. To an outsider, the economics of this country ________ to be in disarray.

    SEEM OR SEEMS
    SEEM

    'Economics,' in this case, means any number of aspects of or facts about the country's financial health, so we need a plural verb. When the word 'economics' refers to the course or the discipline, it is singular.
  3. DON'T VS DOESN'T
    • DON'T = DO NOT
    • DOESN'T DOES NOT

    • DON'T is used when speaking in the first and second person plural and singular and the third person plural
    • ("I," "you," "we," and "they").
    • Used to make a negative statement: 
    • I don't like seafood.        
    • You don't want to do that.         We don't want to go home yet.         They don't have to pay now.

    • DOESN'T  is used when speaking in the third person singular only ("he," "she," and "it").
    • Like don't, doesn't is used to make negative statements:        
    • He doesn't like me.      
    • She doesn't want to leave now.         It doesn't look like he'll be able to make it.

    BOTH CAN BE USED WHEN ASKING A QUESTION. FOLLOW PERSON RULE FOR EACH. 

    • The big difference in use between don't and doesn't is that don't is also used to give commands.
    • (commands in English are always given in the second person singular or plural)        
    •  Don't touch the stove!
  4. WAS VS WERE
    • TRUE STATEMENT OF THE PAST:
    • WAS = SINGULAR
    • WERE = PLURAL

    • I was there.
    • They were not there.

    When you're writing about a non-true situation usually following the word if or the verb wish the verb "to be" is rendered as were.

    • If I was were a rich man.
    • I wish I was were an Oscar Mayer wiener.
  5. Even more important is the chapter dealing with ordnance.

    WHAT IS THE SUBJECT AND VERB?
    Even more important is the chapter dealing with ordnance.

    To give prominence or focus to a particular word or phrase by putting the predicate in the initial position
  6. Seldom has so much been owed by so many to so few.

    what is the subject and verb?
    Seldom has so much been owed by so many to so few.

    When a sentence begins with an adverb or an adverbial phrase or clause, subject follows verb.
  7. When is a verb not a verb?
    When it's a verbal--that is, the form of a verb that functions as another part of speech.

    • Participles
    • 2 TYPES PAST AND PRESENT
    • A verbal that functions as an adjective. Adjective: participial.
    • Present participles: -ing
    • (carrying, sharing, tapping).
    • Past participles of regular verbs end in -ed (carried, shared, tapped).

    • gerunds
    • A traditional grammatical term for a verbal that ends in -ing and functions as a noun. Adjective: gerundial.
    • A gerund with its objects, complements, and modifiers is called a gerund phrase, or simply a noun phrase. And prepositional phrases.

    • infinitives
    • A verbal--often preceded by the particle to--that can function as anoun, an adjective, or an adverb. Adjective: infinitival.
  8. Both present participles and gerunds end in "ing." SO WHAT'S THE DIFFERENCES?
    • GERUND FUNCTIONS AS A NOUN.
    • PARTICIPLE FUNCTIONS AS ADJECTIVE. 


    Gerund is a noun derived from a verb. It can serve the following purposes in a sentence:

    • As subject of a verb
    • Smoking is injurious to health.
    • Trespassing is prohibited.

    • As object of a transitive verb
    • I like reading.
    • She likes singing.

    • As object of a preposition
    • I am tired of waiting.
    • We were stopped from entering the compound.

    • As complement of a verb
    • What I most detest is smoking.

    NOTE: IF THE SENTENCE HAS A SUBJECT AND VERB, THEN IT'S USUALLY A GERUND.

    • Participle is a word which is partly a verb and partly and adjective.
    • Participles are usually used to qualify nouns.
    • EX: A rolling stone gathers no moss.
  9. Everyone vs. Every One
    • Everyone
    • The pronoun everyone may be replaced by everybody. It is used to refer to all the people in a group.

    • The new protocols will affect everyone positively.
    • The new protocols will affect everybody positively.

    • Every one
    • Every one refers to each individual who makes up a group, and means each person.

    • My mother would like to thank every one who offered assistance during her illness.
    • My mother would like to thank each person who offered assistance during her illness.
  10. A) accommadate
    B) acommodate
    C) accommodate
    C) accommodate
  11. These are the joiners of our society who built club memberships and who do good works for the community.
    A) have built
    B) builded
    C) build
    • The correct choice is C.
    • The verb (are) requires a present tense verb (build) to replace "built."
  12. what's unnecessary?

    Students average taking about nine hours each semester. They would like to take more, but there is work that comes before study to keep up their bills for car, clothes, and school.
    A) there is
    B) that
    C) to keep up
    • The correct choice is A.
    • “There is” can usually be eliminated as wordy. Other choices are essential to the ideas of the sentences.

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