Light_Mind 10

Card Set Information

Author:
TuocPham
ID:
276175
Filename:
Light_Mind 10
Updated:
2015-10-27 12:51:23
Tags:
Light
Folders:
The Light of Mind
Description:
LightMind 10
Show Answers:

Home > Flashcards > Print Preview

The flashcards below were created by user TuocPham on FreezingBlue Flashcards. What would you like to do?


  1. Chapter  X
    • The  Light  of  the  Mind  lent  to  the  soul  must  be  restored  to  the
    • Mind.  The  noetic  and  the  mental  senses  are  perfect,  the  psychic
    • sense  is  imperfect.  The  purpose  of  life.  The  incarnating  soul  part,
    • its  condition.  The  rounds  through  which  a  human  being  goes  in  a
    • cycle  of  twelve  lives.  Cycles  due  to  thinking.  The  change  of  sex.
    • Rise  and  fall  of  intellectual  attainment.  How  contact  between  peo¬
    • ple  comes  about.  There  are  twelve  soul  parts  incarnating  in  suc¬
    • cession.  How  a  soul  part  is  drawn  out  for  rebirth.  The  ruling
    • thought.  The  false  I  of  the  incarnated  part.  The  new  human  be¬
    • ing  and  its  relation  to  the  former  one. What  attainments  are
    • brought  over.  What  externals  will  not  reappear.  Why  people  fit
    • into  the  times.  When  the  rebirths  of  the  soul  cease.  The  immortal
    • physical  body. The  triune  soul  fully  incarnated  in  the  immortal
    • body.
  2. REBIRTHS  AND  THE  RESTORING  OF
    THE  LIGHT
    • The  Light  which  was  lent  to  the  soul  so  that  it  might
    • obtain  perfection  by  its  proper  use,  and  which  feeling
    • and  desire  have  allowed  or  caused  to  be  let  go  into  nature,
    • must  be  reclaimed,  must  be  freed,  and  must  be  restored
    • to  the  Mind  which  lent  it. The  noetic  and  the  mental
    • senses  are  perfect  and  are  in  the  Light  of  the  Mind  and
    • the  Light  is  in  them. The  psychic  sense,  by  the  loss  of
    • the  Light,  has  broken  up  and  deformed  the  body  in  which
    • it  dwells. The  immediate  purpose  of  life,  however  little
    • this  is  realized,  is  to  stop  the  loss  of  the  Light  and  to
    • reclaim  Light  from  nature. Until  all  the  Light  is  re¬
    • stored  to  the  Mind  whence  it  came  the  different  parts
    • of  the  psychic  sense  are  reborn  and  go  through  their
    • cycles  of  lives.

    • When  the  heaven  period  is  past  and  the  soul  part  has
    • worked  itself  under  the  Light,  it  comes  again  to  the
    • common  ground  of  all  the  worlds  where  nature  and  the
    • soul  meet  on  the  physical  plane. Some  of  its  feelings
    • and  desires  are  outstanding  in  animal  forms. Some  of
    • the  Light  that  was  lent  it  for  its  use  is  outstanding  in
    • nature  and  must  be  reclaimed. There  is  a  vast  number
    • of  feelings  and  desires  for  things  in  life  unsatisfied  but
    • asleep  in  the  psychic  atmosphere.  The  thoughts  ever
    • moving  in  the  mental  atmosphere  seek  exteriorization.
    • They  come  into  touch  with  and  awaken  the  sleeping
    • desires.  Their  own  power  is  used  by  the  presence  of  the
    • Light  to  compel  their  exteriorizations  until  they  are
    • balanced.

    • Usually  the  human  beings  of  a  soul  part  are  taken  in
    • a  round  from  affluence  through  poverty  to  affluence,
    • from  prominence  through  obscurity  to  prominence,
    • from  hazards  to  security  and  back  to  hazards,  and  from
    • variety  through  monotony  to  variety,  by  a  cycle  of
    • twelve  earth  lives. These  outward  changes  come  about
    • through  cycles  in  nature. Thus  are  made  the  twelve
    • steps  of  the  tread-wheel  which  takes  one  through  the
    • rounds. These  cyclic  changes  are  arranged  so  that  they
    • fit  in  with  the  man's  destiny  and  yet  obey  the  law  that
    • the  succession  of  events  proceeds  in  four  seasons,  each
    • with  three  aspects. Nearly  everyone  who  today  is
    • swallowed  up  in  the  mass,  poor  in  physique,  in  purse,
    • in  intellect,  and  is  ruled  by  his  desires,  has  within  twelve
    • lives  held  possessions,  been  valiant  in  adventures  and
    • enjoyed  pleasures  in  abundance  though  his  psychic  and
    • mental  weakness  may  not  have  varied  much  from  that
    • of  the  herd  of  humanity  today. The  twelve  aspects  of
    • such  a  cycle  present  phases  of  life  which  are  not  essen¬
    • tial. But  the  conditions  of  the  soul  part  are  essential.
    • They  are  the  result  of  thinking  due  to  one's  choice
    • among  his  feelings  and  desires.

    • These  conditions  of  the  soul  bring  about  other  cycles
    • which  are  independent  of  the  cycle  of  twelve,  and  may
    • be  for  more  or  less  than  twelve  lives. Among  such
    • cycles  are  those  of  sex,  of  persistence  or  lethargy  in
    • thinking,  of  intellectual  attainments  and  their  loss,  and
    • of  associations  and  relations  with  others.

    • A  change  of  sex  comes  through  thinking  and  feeling.
    • If  the  soul  part  which  incarnates  as  a  woman  thinks
    • enough  on  the  line  of  desire,  its  next  life  on  earth  will
    • be  in  a  male  body,  or  if  it  thinks  enough  on  the  line  of
    • feeling  its  next  body  will  be  female. If  a  man  thinks
    • according  to  feeling,  his  soul  part  will  be  incarnate  in
    • a  female  body. The  change  from  one  sex  to  the  other
    • is  the  result  of  several,  sometimes  of  many,  lives  of
    • thinking;  it  is  not  due  to  the  thinking  of  one  life  alone.

    • Another  cycle  in  which  a  soul  part  rises  and  falls  is
    • of  mental  attitudes  and  the  character  of  its  mental  at¬
    • mosphere. This  cycle  may  be  complete  in  one  life  or
    • it  may  cover  several. When  there  is  the  impulse  to  go
    • ahead  in  thinking,  man  is  not  strong  enough  to  main¬
    • tain  the  effort  and  the  advance.  Then  there  is  a  reaction
    • of  lethargy  in  thinking  brought  about  by  a  pull  of  de¬
    • sires,  in  other  directions. The  tendency  of  the  other
    • desires  pulling  against  the  rise  brings  about  a  retrogres¬
    • sion  in  thinking  and  the  consequent  drifting,  superficial
    • life.

    • The  rise  and  fall  in  intellectual  attainment  is  also  due
    • to  cycles  of  thinking. Mere  sense  knowledge  is  not
    • brought  over,  since  the  aia-form  on  which  the  record
    • is  made  is  destroyed. There  may  be  brought  over  what
    • mental  operations  have  extracted  during  their  manipu¬
    • lations  of  scientific  attainments,  and  what  they  have
    • appropriated. They  do  not  appropriate  anything  from
    • slight  acquaintance  and  superficial  dealing. What  the
    • mental  sense  has  acquired  by  intimate  and  thorough  oc¬
    • cupation  with  sciences  will  be  brought  over  as  a  ten¬
    • dency  to  take  them  up  in  the  new  life,  and  as  a  ready
    • understanding  of  them.

    • Contact  between  people  comes  about  by  thinking  on
    • similar  or  opposed  lines. The  relation  begins  casually,
    • grows  closer,  and  then  moderates,  weakens,  and  dis¬
    • appears. That  friends  and  enemies  are  husband  and
    • wife,  parent  and  child,  brother  and  sister  and  so  in
    • situations  where  they  meet  continually,  gives  them  an
    • opportunity  to  work  together  in  a  friendly  way  or
    • to  work  out  or  aggravate  old  troubles. While  it  is  not
    • impossible  for  two  or  more  souls  to  remain  in  close  con¬
    • tact  for  the  whole  period  of  their  soul  development,  this
    • is  most  unusual.

    • There  are  twelve  soul  parts,  each  having  a  portion
    • of  the  three  soul  senses,  and  each  representing  a  dif¬
    • ferent  aspect  of  the  soul. Each  of  these  parts  is  spoken
    • of  as  if  separate,  but  it  is  related  to  all  the  others,  be¬
    • cause  the  soul  is  one.  Each  part  is  responsible  for  itself,
    • makes  its  own  destiny,  takes  up  its  own  life,  and  reaps
    • what  it  has  sown. At  the  end  of  the  heaven  period  the
    • part  enters  again  into  the  communion  of  the  other  parts.
    • These  twelve  parts  incarnate  in  turn. Not  until  the
    • other  eleven  parts  have  had  their  earth  lives  with  their
    • experiences,  does  the  first  part  appear  again  on  earth.
    • All  twelve  parts  use  the  same  aia  and  the  same  composi¬
    • tor  units.

    • There  are  in  a  human  being  feelings  and  desires  that
    • demand  communion  with  the  mental  and  noetic  senses.
    • Yet  man  is  not  satisfied  if  he  tries  to  feel  and  think
    • beyond  nature. This  is  so  with  every  incarnate  soul
    • part,  but  it  is  true  in  a  greater  degree  when  certain  of
    • the  twelve  parts  are  incarnated,  and  the  demand  for
    • communion  with  the  mental  and  noetic  senses  is  more
    • urgent. These  parts  are  those  on  the  mind  side. Then
    • the  restlessness  causes  him  to  seek  piety,  mysticism,
    • philosophy,  occultism,  asceticism,  or  forces  him  to  en¬
    • gage  in  good  works.

    • The  incarnation  of  any  one  of  the  twelve  portions  of
    • the  psychic  sense  is  usually  for  the  life  of  the  body,  so
    • that  during  that  incarnation  the  other  portions  are  not
    • incarnate. But  it  is  sometimes  the  case  that  two  or
    • more  portions  incarnate,  one  after  the  other,  using  the
    • same  aia-form  and  so  in  the  same  life. Then  the  per¬
    • son  shows  successively  different  characters,  which  are
    • often  displayed  in  different  positions  in  life.  Ultimately
    • the  body  must  be  so  competent  that  all  twelve  portions
    • will  be  in  it  at  the  same  time,  so  that  the  whole  psychic
    • sense  is  incarnate.

    • The  next  part  to  be  incarnated  is  drawn  out  accord¬
    • ing  to  the  ruling  thought  of  that  part. That  thought  is
    • the  sum  of  the  thoughts  of  the  past  life. Though  these
    • may  seem  numerous  and  hard  to  coordinate,  the
    • thoughts  which  underlie  them  are  simple  and  much
    • alike,  because  they  have  the  same  aim. Their  designs
    • make  them  vary. The  thoughts  of  any  life  are  united
    • by  one  aim  or  by  a  few  aims  into  one  dominating
    • thought,  which  has  a  continuity,  notwithstanding  slight
    • variations  in  the  aim. It  changes  little  from  life  to  life
    • with  average  people  because  they  allow  themselves  to
    • be  pushed  or  led  by  circumstances  and  by  passive  think¬
    • ing. The  ruling  thought  is  a  being  of  great  power.

    • When  the  time  for  rebirth  has  arrived  the  ruling
    • thought  draws  out  of  the  senses  in  the  atmospheres  of
    • the  soul  the  particular  part  which  is  to  be  re-embodied.
    • This  is  made  up  of  the  same  sense  portions  by  which
    • that  thought  was  built  up,  as  the  sum  total  of  lesser
    • thoughts;  and  it  is  the  part  that  will  be  affected  by  the
    • acts,  objects,  and  events  of  the  life  for  which  the  em¬
    • bodiment  is  to  be  made. Other  portions  of  the  soul  are
    • drawn  in  for  embodiment  to  supply  the  characteristics
    • which  the  ruling  thought  requires  to  let  the  person  be
    • a  burglar  or  a  banker,  a  clam  digger  or  an  archaeologist,
    • a  housewife  or  an  actress. Without  these  other  parts
    • the  ruling  thought  could  not  manifest  itself  as  the  new
    • human  being. These  other  parts  are  drawn  in  to  satisfy
    • unfulfilled  wishes,  to  enable  destiny  to  come  home,  to
    • allow  other  thoughts  to  find  cyclic  expression  which  past
    • lives  did  not  afford  them,  to  furnish  an  opportunity  for
    • learning  special  things,  to  open  avenues  for  new  adven¬
    • tures,  and  to  fill  out  the  human  being  in  the  personality.

    • After  the  selection  of  these  portions  the  part  about
    • to  incarnate  stays  with  the  soul  until  after  the  physical
    • body  is  born. After  birth  the  selected  portion  of  the
    • psychic  sense  incarnates  through  the  breath  into  the
    • blood  and  is  located  in  the  kidneys  and  adrenals. This
    • is  the  advent  of  the  psychic  sense. Gradually  more  of
    • it  incarnates. Later  in  life  the  selected  portions  of  the
    • mental  and  of  the  noetic  sense  come  into  contact. By
    • incarnation  is  meant  that  the  psychic  sense  is  rooted
    • in  the  kidneys  and  adrenals,  the  mental  sense  merely
    • touches  the  heart  and  lungs,  and  the  noetic  sense  touches
    • the  pituitary  and  pineal  glands. Portions  of  the  at¬
    • mospheres  come  in  only  by  means  of  the  senses. They
    • are  not  incarnated  but  surge,  play,  and  flash  through
    • the  organs  in  which  the  senses  are.

    • In  this  way  incarnate  portions  of  the  soul  which  ap¬
    • pear  as  one  being  are  inseparable  and  are  conscious  as
    • an  "I." While  there  is  a  true  identity  behind  this  "I,"
    • the  identity  of  which  the  incarnated  soul  part  is  conscious
    • is  a  false  one.

    • The  personality  of  the  new  life  is  not  the  one  of  the
    • former  life,  though  much  of  the  old  material  is  taken.
    • The  aia,  the  four  senses,  and  the  various  compositor
    • units  that  control  the  organs  and  features  of  the  body
    • are  always  brought  over,  but  the  fleeting  matter  that
    • at  various  times  made  up  the  bulk  of  the  physical  body
    • and  was  held  for  a  while  by  the  compositor  units  does
    • not  reincarnate,  though  certain  fractions  of  it  may  pass
    • through  the  body  again. Nor  is  the  aia-form  brought
    • over.

    • All  attainments  which  are  matters  of  memory,  like
    • professional  or  business  efficiency,  together  with  me¬
    • chanical  skill,  are  left  behind,  whereas  tendencies,  habits,
    • manners,  and  temperament,  which  are  not  as  superficial
    • but  express  aspects  of  the  soul  part  itself,  may  be  brought
    • over  as  characteristic  traits. Such  externals  as  rank,
    • money,  position,  success,  or  their  opposites,  are  evan¬
    • escent  and,  if  not  needed  for  the  soul  part  to  learn  from,
    • will  not  appear  among  the  surroundings  of  the  new
    • human  being.

    • People  fit  into  the  times  in  which  they  are  born,  al¬
    • though  the  other  soul  parts  have  had  to  incarnate  before
    • this  birth  can  take  place,  and  although  language  and  occu¬
    • pation  are  different. There  is  nothing  new  under  the
    • sun. Indeed  the  sun  is  much  newer  than  the  things
    • which  have  been  recurring  on  the  earth  since  the  sun
    • existed.  The  soul  has  gone  through  all  experiences  over
    • and  over. Therefore  a  man  does  not  have  to  come  from
    • a  recent  past  to  fit  into  his  place  at  the  present  time.

    • The  rebirths  of  the  soul  finally  cease  when  the  soul
    • parts  which  incarnated  successively,  have  all  added  to
    • the  improvement  of  the  body  so  as  to  make  it  immortal,
    • when  their  psychic  portions  have  become  perfect  like
    • their  mental  and  noetic  portions,  and  when  the  twelve
    • parts  are  all  incarnated  in  that  immortal  body.

    • This  body  will  have  four  brains,  one  in  the  pelvis,  one
    • in  the  abdomen,  one  in  the  thorax,  and  one  in  the  head.
    • There  will  be  two  spinal  columns,  one  female  in  front,
    • for  nature,  which  is  now  broken  at  the  sternum,  and
    • one  male  in  the  back  for  the  soul,  both  curved  and  united
    • at  the  lower  end  and  opening  into  the  head. The  fluids
    • in  the  body  will  be  in  a  state  of  sublimation. The  body
    • will  be  made  of  rarefied  matter  and  will  be  without  sex.
    • It  will  be  nourished  by  the  essence  from  the  four  ele¬
    • ments  taken  in  directly. This  fourfold  body  will  not
    • be  subject  to  disease,  injury,  or  decay. The  matter  of
    • the  four  worlds  will  respond  to  the  action  of  the  senses,
    • nerves,  glands,  and  systems  of  the  body. The  immortal
    • state  of  this  body  is  the  measure  of  the  condition  of
    • the  soul  that  inhabits  it.

    • There  is  a  long  course  ahead  for  human  beings  before
    • they  cease  to  be  mere  human  beings  and  become  con¬
    • scious  as  souls  in  their  immortal  bodies. They  must
    • lose  no  more  Light  and  must  reclaim  the  Light  lent  to
    • them  and  outstanding  in  nature. They  must  rebuild
    • the  "broken  column"  and  connect  it  at  the  base  with
    • the  rear  column. They  must  improve  their  bodies  so
    • that  the  sexual  organs  will  disappear,  transformed  into
    • parts  of  a  pelvic  brain,  which  is  now  nerve  ganglia
    • spread  about  the  abdominal  cavity,  and  so  that  the  aia-
    • form  will  be  seated  as  the  blending  of  the  two  spines
    • below,  where  it  belongs,  not  as  it  is  now  in  one  half  of
    • the  pituitary  gland,  where  it  interfers  with  I-ness.  They
    • must  so  temper  the  physical  body  in  the  forces  of  nature
    • that  nature  can  no  longer  have  any  control  over  it.

    • The  psychic  and  the  mental  senses  will  then  incarnate
    • at  their  proper  stations  in  the  two  spinal  columns  in¬
    • stead  of  in  the  kidneys  and  adrenals,  and  the  heart  and
    • lungs. The  noetic  sense  will  be  incarnated  in  the  pitui¬
    • tary  and  pineal  glands,  instead  of  merely  touching  them
    • intermittently. The  three  soul  atmospheres  will  be  ab¬
    • sorbed  into  the  three  soul  senses. The  three  soul  senses
    • will  descend  into  three  inner  bodies,  each  born  imme¬
    • diately  through  the  fourfold  physical  body  and  all  acting
    • through  it. In  the  physical  body  will  be  the  triune  soul
    • fully  incarnated  by  means  of  its  three  inner  bodies.
    • Light  will  be  again  with  the  psychic  sense,  from  which  it
    • was  absent  for  so  long. Light  will  be  in  the  three
    • bodies  of  the  soul  and  in  the  physical  body. All  the
    • Light  that  was  lent  to  the  soul  will  be  reclaimed,  freed,
    • and  ready  to  be  restored  to  the  parent  Mind. The  soul
    • will  be  ready  to  become  a  Mind,  to  raise  its  aia  to  be  a
    • soul,  and  to  develop  its  own  potential  Light.

    • The  purpose  of  the  Universe,  from  the  human  stand¬
    • point  is  to  develop  matter  until  it  becomes  Conscious¬
    • ness. This  is  done  by  developing  nature  units  until
    • they  become  souls. Then  the  souls  receive  Light  from
    • the  Minds  that  raised  them  to  be  souls,  enough  Light
    • to  perfect  themselves  with,  that  is,  to  evoke  the  Light
    • that,  until  they  become  Minds,  is  potential  in  the  souls.
    • This  is  the  purpose,  but  it  is  not  achieved  at  once,  be¬
    • cause  the  souls  lose  to  nature  the  Light  lent  to  them.
    • The  puppet  show  of  life  on  earth,  repeated  and  re¬
    • peated,  is  held  to  make  the  human  beings  of  the  souls
    • preserve  and  reclaim  the  Light.  They  must  go  on  until
    • they  have  freed  the  Light  lent  to  them  and  made  it  un¬
    • attachable  to  nature. Then  the  souls  can  evoke  their
    • own  potential  Light,  restore  to  the  Minds  what  was  lent
    • by  them,  and  themselves  become  Minds.
  3. APPENDIX

    Preface  to  Harold  W.  Percival's  Thinking  and  the
    Law  of  Thought
    • There  may  be  those  who  would  like  to  read  about  the
    • manner  in  which  this  book  was  produced  by  Mr.  Percival.
    • For  them  I  am  writing  this  preface  with  his  permission.

    • He  dictated  because,  as  he  said,  he  could  not  think  and
    • write  at  the  same  time.  His  body  had  to  be  still  when  he
    • wanted  to  dictate.

    • He  dictated  without  referring  to  any  book  or  other
    • authority. I  know  of  no  book  from  which  he  could  have
    • gotten  the  knowledge  here  set  down. He  did  not  get  it
    • and  could  not  have  gotten  it  clairvoyantly  or  psychically.

    • In  answer  to  a  question  how  he  obtained  the  informa¬
    • tion,  which  goes  beyond  the  four  great  spheres  and  the
    • Supreme  Intelligence,  and  reaches  Consciousness  itself,  he
    • said  that  several  times  since  his  youth  he  had  been  con¬
    • scious  of  Consciousness.  Therefore  he  could  become  con¬
    • scious  of  the  state  of  any  being  whatever,  whether  in  the
    • manifested  Universe  or  the  Unmanifested,  by  thinking
    • about  it. He  said  that  when  he  thought  of  a  subject
    • intently  the  thinking  ended  when  the  subject  opened  up  as
    • from  a  point  into  completeness.

    • The  difficulty  he  encountered,  so  he  said,  was  to  bring
    • this  information  out  of  the  Ever-Unmanifested,  the  spheres
    • or  the  worlds  into  his  mental  atmosphere. A  still  greater
    • difficulty  was  expressing  it  precisely  and  so  that  any  one
    • would  understand  it,  in  a  language  in  which  there  were  no
    • suitable  words.

    • It  is  hard  to  say  which  seemed  the  more  remarkable,  his
    • manner  of  stating  his  facts  accurately  in  the  organic  form
    • he  made  or  their  verification  by  his  reading  of  the  symbols
    • he  mentions  in  the  fourteenth  chapter.

    • He  said  this  book  deals  with  general  things  and  there
    • are  innumerable  exceptions. He  said  this  is  an  age  of
    • thought;  there  is  a  Western  cycle  swinging  in,  and  condi¬
    • tions  are  shaped  for  insight  and  growth.

    • Thirty-seven  years  ago  he  gave  me  much  of  the  infor¬
    • mation  now  in  this  book. For  thirty  years  I  have  lived
    • with  him  in  the  same  house  and  written  down  some  of  his
    • sayings.

    • While  Mr.  Percival  published  the  twenty-five  volumes
    • of  The  Word  from  October,  1904,  to  September,  1917,
    • he  dictated  some  of  the  Editorials  to  me,  and  the  others  to
    • another  friend. They  were  dictated  hurriedly,  to  be  pub¬
    • lished  in  the  next  issue  of  The  Word.  Among  them  were
    • nine,  from  August,  1908,  to  April,  1909,  on  Karma. He
    • read  this  term  as  Ka-R-Ma,  meaning  desire  and  mind  in
    • action,  that  is,  thoughts. The  cycles  of  the  exterioriza¬
    • tions  of  a  thought  are  destiny  for  the  one  who  created  the
    • thought. Mr.  Percival  made  there  an  attempt  to  explain
    • their  destiny  to  human  beings,  by  showing  them  a  con¬
    • tinuity  underlying  what  appear  to  be  arbitrary,  casual
    • events  in  the  lives  of  men,  communities  and  peoples.

    • Mr.  Percival  at  that  time  intended  to  tell  enough  to  en¬
    • able  every  one  who  wished  to  find  out  something  about
    • who  he  was,  where  he  was  and  his  destiny.  Generally,  his
    • chief  object  was  to  bring  the  readers  of  The  Word  to  an
    • understanding  of  the  states  in  which  they  are  conscious.
    • In  this  book  he  meant  in  addition  to  aid  any  who  wish
    • to become conscious of Consciousness. As human
    • thoughts,  which  are  mostly  of  a  sex,  elemental,  emotional
    • and  intellectual  nature,  are  exteriorized  in  the  acts,  objects
    • and  events  of  everyday  life,  he  also  wished  to  communi¬
    • cate  information  about  the  thinking  which  does  not  create
    • thoughts,  and  is  the  only  way  to  free  the  soul  from  this
    • life.

    • Therefore  he  redictated  to  me  the  nine  editorials  on
    • Karma,  the  four  chapters  which  are  in  this  book  the  fifth,
    • sixth,  seventh  and  eighth,  named  Physical,  Psychic,  Men¬
    • tal  and  Noetic  Destiny. They  were  the  foundation. He
    • dictated  the  second  chapter  to  give  the  Plan  and  Purpose
    • of  the  Universe,  and  the  fourth  to  show  the  Operation  of
    • the  Law  of  Thought  in  it. In  the  third  chapter  he  dealt
    • briefly  with  Objections  some  would  make  whose  concep¬
    • tions  are  limited  by  the  credulity  of  sense-bound  souls.
    • Re-existence  must  be  understood  in  order  to  apprehend  the
    • method  by  which  destiny  works;  and  so  he  dictated  the
    • ninth  chapter  on  the  re-existence  of  the  twelve  soul  parts
    • in  their  order.  The  tenth  chapter  was  added  to  throw  light
    • on  the  Gods  and  their  Religions. In  the  eleventh  he  dealt
    • with  The  Path,  a  three-fold  Path,  on  which  the  soul  frees
    • itself. The  largest  esoteric  school  in  existence  that  has
    • preserved  symbols  of  the  true  history,  make-up  and  even¬
    • tual  freedom  of  the  soul  is  Freemasonry. In  the  twelfth
    • chapter  he  dealt  with  this. He  ended  with  the  geometrical
    • symbols  hidden  in  the  forms  of  the  lodge  room,  tools  and
    • paraphernalia,  in  which  these  teachings  are  preserved
    • through  the  Order. In  the  thirteenth  chapter,  on  the
    • Point  or  Circle,  he  showed  the  mechanical  method  of  the
    • continuous  creation  of  the  Universe. The  fourteenth
    • chapter,  on  the  Circle,  treats  of  the  twelve  nameless  points
    • on  the  nameless  circle,  which  he  distinguished  by  the  signs
    • of  the  zodiac,  so  that  they  can  be  handled  in  a  precise
    • manner  and  so  that  anyone  who  chooses  may  draw  in
    • simple  lines  the  geometrical  symbol  which,  if  he  can  read
    • it,  proves  to  him  what  is  written  in  this  book. In  the
    • fifteenth  chapter  he  offered  a  system  by  which  one  can
    • think  without  creating  thoughts,  and  indicated  the  only  way
    • to  freedom,  because  all  thoughts  make  destiny. There  is
    • a  thinking  about  the  soul,  but  there  are  no  thoughts
    • about  it.

    • Since  1912  he  has  outlined  the  matter  for  the  chapters
    • and  their  sections. Whenever  both  of  us  were  available,
    • throughout  these  many  years,  he  dictated. He  wanted  to
    • share  his  knowledge,  however  great  the  effort,  however
    • long  the  time  it  took  to  clothe  it  in  accurately  fitting  words.
    • He  spoke  freely  to  any  one  who  approached  and  wanted
    • to  hear  from  him  about  the  matters  in  this  book.

    • He  did  not  use  specialized  language.  He  wanted  anyone
    • who  read  it  to  understand  the  book. He  spoke  evenly,  and
    • slowly  enough  for  me  to  write  his  words  in  long  hand.
    • Though  most  of  what  is  in  this  book  was  expressed  for
    • the  first  time,  his  speech  was  natural  and  in  plain  sentences
    • without  vacuous  or  turgid  verbosity. He  gave  no  argu¬
    • ment,  opinion  or  belief  or  examples,  nor  did  he  state  con¬
    • clusions. He  told  what  he  was  conscious  of. He  used
    • familiar  words  or,  for  new  things,  combinations  of  simple
    • words. He  never  hinted. He  never  left  anything  un¬
    • finished,  indefinite,  mysterious. Usually  he  exhausted  his
    • subject,  as  far  as  he  wished  to  speak  about  it,  along  the
    • line  on  which  he  was. When  the  subject  came  up  on
    • another  line  he  spoke  of  it  along  that.

    • What  he  had  spoken  he  did  not  remember  in  detail.  He
    • said  that  he  did  not  care  to  remember  the  information  I
    • had  set  down.  He  thought  of  every  subject  as  it  came  up,
    • irrespective  of  what  he  had  already  said  about  it. Thus
    • when  he  dictated  summaries  of  previous  statements  he
    • thought  about  the  matters  once  more  and  acquired  the
    • knowledge  anew. So  often  new  things  were  added  to  the
    • summaries. Without  premeditation,  the  results  of  his
    • thinking  on  the  same  subjects  along  different  lines,  and
    • sometimes  at  intervals  of  years,  were  in  agreement.  Thus
    • in  the  eighteenth  section  of  the  chapter  on  re-existence  the
    • views  are  along  the  lines  of  Consciousness,  continuity  and
    • illusion;  in  the  first  six  sections  of  chapter  fifteen  the  view
    • is  from  the  standpoint  of  thinking;  yet  what  he  said  about
    • the  same  facts  at  these  different  times  under  these  different
    • circumstances  was  compatible.

    • At  times  he  talked  in  answer  to  questions  for  more  de¬
    • tails.  He  asked  that  these  questions  be  precise  and  on  one
    • point  at  a  time. Sometimes  sections  were  redictated,  if
    • he  opened  a  subject  so  wide  that  a  restatement  became
    • necessary.  What  I  had  taken  down  from  him  I  read  over,
    • and  at  times,  by  drawing  his  sentences  together  and  omit¬
    • ting  some  repetitions,  smoothed  it  out  with  the  assistance
    • of  Helen  Stone  Gattell,  who  had  written  for  The  Word.
    • The  language  which  he  had  used  was  not  changed. Noth¬
    • ing  was  added. Some  of  his  words  were  transposed  for
    • readability. When  this  book  was  finished  and  typewritten
    • he  read  it  and  settled  its  final  form.

    • When  he  spoke,  he  remembered  that  humans  do  not  see
    • correctly  form,  size,  color,  positions  and  do  not  see  light
    • at  all;  that  they  can  see  only  in  a  curve  called  a  straight
    • line  and  can  see  only  matter  in  the  four  solid  states  and
    • only  when  it  is  massed;  that  their  perception  by  sight  is
    • limited  by  the  size  of  the  object,  its  distance  and  the  nature
    • of  intervening  matter;  that  they  must  have  sunlight,  direct
    • or  indirect,  and  cannot  see  color  beyond  the  spectrum,  or
    • form  beyond  outline;  and  that  they  can  see  only  outside
    • and  not  within.  He  remembered  that  their  conceptions  are
    • only  one  step  ahead  of  their  perceptions.  He  kept  in  mind
    • that  they  are  conscious  only  as  feelings  and  as  desires  and
    • are  sometimes  conscious  of  their  thinking.  He  remembered
    • that  the  conceptions  men  derive  within  these  limits  are
    • further  limited  by  their  possibilities  of  thinking. Though
    • there  are  twelve  types  of  thinking,  they  can  think  only
    • according  to  the  type  of  two,  that  is,  of  me  and  not  me,  the
    • one  and  the  other,  the  inside  and  the  outside,  the  visible
    • and  the  invisible,  the  finite  and  the  infinite,  material  and
    • immaterial,  light  and  dark,  near  and  far,  male  and  female;
    • they  cannot  think  steadily  but  only  intermittently,  between
    • breaths;  they  use  only  one  mental  operation  out  of  the
    • seven;  and  they  think  only  according  to  the  subjects  sug¬
    • gested  by  seeing,  hearing,  tasting,  smelling  and  contacting.
    • About  things  not  physical  they  think  in  words  which  are
    • mostly  metaphors  of  physical  objects. Because  there  is  no
    • other  vocabulary,  they  apply  their  terms  of  nature,  such
    • as  spirit  and  force  and  time,  to  the  soul. They  speak  of
    • the  force  of  desire,  and  of  spirit  as  something  of  or  beyond
    • the  soul. They  speak  of  time  as  applicable  to  the  soul.
    • The  words  in  which  they  think  prevent  them  from  seeing
    • the  distinction  between  nature  and  the  soul.

    • Long  ago  Mr.  Percival  made  the  distinction  between  the
    • four  states—and  their  substates—in  which  matter  is  con¬
    • scious  on  the  nature  side  and  the  three  states  as  which  the
    • soul  is  conscious  on  the  mind  side. He  said  that  the  laws
    • and  attributes  of  nature  matter  do  not  in  any  way  apply  to
    • the  soul,  which  is  mind  matter.  He  dwelt  on  the  necessity
    • of  making  the  flesh  body  immortal,  during  life. He  made
    • clear  the  relation  of  the  soul  to  its  aia  and  to  the  aia-form
    • upon  which  the  astral  body  molds  itself  and  which  holds
    • the  fourfold  physical  body  in  form. He  distinguished  be-
    • tween  the  two  aspects  of  each  of  the  three  soul  senses,  and
    • he  showed  the  relation  of  the  soul  to  a  Mind  from  whom  it
    • receives  the  light  it  uses  in  thinking. He  showed  distinc¬
    • tions  between  mental  operations. He  pointed  out  that  a
    • human  being  feels  sensations,  which  are  elementals,  but
    • does  not  feel  his  own  feeling  as  distinct  from  the  sensa¬
    • tions. He  said  that  all  nature  matter  as  well  as  all  mind
    • matter  progresses  only  while  it  is  in  a  human  body. More
    • than  thirty  years  ago  he  dwelt  on  the  value  of  geometrical
    • symbols  and  used  one  set,  that  of  the  point  or  circle,  for
    • his  system.

    • However,  not  all  of  this  appears  in  Mr.  Percival's  edi¬
    • torials  in  The  Word  as  plainly  as  it  does  in  this  book.
    • His  Word  articles  were  dictated  from  month  to  month,  and
    • while  there  was  not  time  to  create  an  accurate  and  compre¬
    • hensive  terminology,  his  articles  had  to  use  the  ineffective
    • terms  of  those  already  in  print. The  words  at  his  hand
    • made  no  distinction  between  the  nature  side  and  the  mind
    • side. "Spirit"  and  "spiritual"  were  used  as  applicable  to
    • the  soul  or  to  nature,  though  spirit,  he  said,  is  a  term  which
    • can  properly  be  applied  to  nature  only. The  word
    • "psychic"  was  used  as  referring  to  nature  and  to  the  soul,
    • and  so  it  made  the  distinction  of  its  various  meanings  diffi¬
    • cult. Planes  like  the  psychic,  mental  and  spiritual  planes
    • referred  to  matter  that  is  conscious  as  nature,  for  there
    • are  no  planes  in  the  soul.

    • When  he  dictated  this  book  and  had  time  he  formerly
    • lacked,  he  created  a  terminology  which  accepted  words
    • which  were  in  use,  but  might  suggest  what  he  intended
    • when  he  gave  them  a  specific  meaning. He  said  "Try  to
    • understand  what  is  meant  by  the  term,  do  not  cling  to  the
    • word."

    • He  thus  termed  the  nature  matter  on  the  physical  plane,
    • the  radiant,  gaseous,  liquid  and  solid  states  of  matter.
    • The  invisible  planes  of  the  physical  world  he  named  the
    • form,  the  life  and  the  light  planes,  and  to  the  worlds  above
    • the  physical  world  he  gave  the  names  of  the  form  world,
    • the  life  world  and  the  light  world. All  are  of  nature.
    • But  the  states  in  which  mind  matter  is  conscious  as  a  soul
    • he  called  the  psychic,  mental  and  noetic  states  of  the  soul
    • sense,  atmospheres  and  breaths.  He  named  the  aspects  of
    • the  psychic  sense  feeling  and  desire,  those  of  the  mental
    • sense  rightness  and  reason,  and  those  of  the  noetic  sense
    • I-ness  and  selfness. In  every  case  he  gave  definitions  or
    • descriptions  when  words  were  used  by  him  with  a  specific
    • meaning. The  only  word  he  coined  is  the  word  aia,  be¬
    • cause  there  is  no  word  in  any  language  for  what  it  denomi¬
    • nates.  The  pyrogen,  aerogen,  hydrogen  and  geogen  in  the
    • part  on  pre-chemistry  are  self-explanatory.

    • His  book  proceeds  from  simple  statements  to  details.
    • In  the  beginning  the  soul  was  spoken  of  as  ex-isting.  Later
    • he  showed  that  what  actually  takes  place  is  the  ex-istence
    • of  a  portion  of  the  psychic  sense  in  the  kidneys  and
    • adrenals  and  that  to  that  is  related  a  portion  of  the  mental
    • and  to  that  a  portion  of  the  noetic  sense,  only  these  three
    • portions  making  up  the  soul  in  a  human  being.  At  first  the
    • mental  operations  were  mentioned  generally,  but  later  it
    • was  shown  that  only  one  mental  operation,  the  first,  is  all
    • that  feeling  and  desire  can  use  and  that  the  light  in  this  is
    • all  they  do  use  of  the  Light  of  the  Mind,  in  generating  the
    • thoughts  which  have  built  up  this  civilization.

    • He  spoke  in  a  new  way  of  many  subjects,  among  them
    • of  Consciousness,  in  the  second  chapter;  Money,  in  the  fifth
    • chapter;  Vibrations,  Colors,  Mediumship,  Materializa¬
    • tions  and  Astrology,  in  the  sixth  chapter,  and  there  also
    • about  Hope,  Joyousness,  Trust  and  Ease;  Diseases  and
    • their  Cures,  in  the  seventh  chapter.

    • He  said  new  things  about  the  Unmanifested  and  the
    • manifested  Spheres,  Worlds  and  Planes;  Reality,  Illusion
    • and  Glamour;  Geometrical  Symbols;  Space;  Time;  Dimen¬
    • sions  ;  the  Units;  the  Mind;  the  Soul;  the  false  "I";
    • Thinking  and  Thoughts;  Feeling  and  Desire;  Memory;
    • Conscience;  the  States  After  Death;  the  Great  Path;  Wise
    • Men;  the  Aia  and  the  Aia-Form;  the  Four  Senses;  the
    • Fourfold  Body;  the  Breath;  Re-existence;  the  Origin  of
    • the  Sexes;  the  Lunar  and  the  Solar  Germs;  Christianity;
    • Gods;  the  Cycles  of  Religions;  the  Four  Classes;  Mysti¬
    • cism;  Schools  of  Thought;  Freemasonry;  the  Sun,  Moon
    • and  Stars;  the  Four  Layers  of  the  Earth;  the  Fire,  Air,
    • Water  and  Earth  Ages. He  said  new  things  about  other
    • subjects  too  numerous  to  mention.  Mostly  he  spoke  about
    • the  Light  of  the  Mind,  which  is  Truth. His  statements
    • were  reasonable.  They  clarified  each  other. From  what¬
    • ever  angle  seen,  certain  facts  are  identical  or  corroborated
    • by  others  or  supported  by  correspondence. A  definite
    • order  holds  all  that  he  said  together. His  system  is  pro¬
    • found  and  complete. It  is  capable  of  being  demonstrated
    • by  a  set  of  simple  symbols  based  on  the  twelve  points  of
    • the  circle. His  facts  stated  briefly  and  clearly  are  con¬
    • sistent.  This  consistency  of  the  many  things  he  said  with¬
    • in  the  vast  compass  of  nature  and  of  the  still  greater
    • number  of  things  within  the  narrow  range  relating  to  the
    • soul  in  a  human  being,  should  convince  any  thinker  that
    • these  things  cannot  be  otherwise.

    • This  book,  Mr.  Percival  said,  is  primarily  for  any  who
    • wish  to  become  conscious  of  Consciousness,  for  those  who
    • want  to  balance  their  thoughts  and  for  those  who  want  to
    • think  without  creating  thoughts.  There  is  a  great  deal  in
    • it  that  will  interest  the  average  reader.  Once  having  read
    • this  he  will  see  life  as  a  game  played  by  nature  and  the
    • soul  with  the  shadows  of  thoughts. The  thoughts  are  the
    • realities,  the  shadows  are  their  projections  into  the  acts,
    • objects  and  events  of  life. The  rules  of  the  game?  The
    • law  of  thought. Nature  will  play  as  long  as  the  soul  will.
    • But  there  comes  a  time  when  the  soul  wants  to  stop,  when
    • feeling  and  desire  have  reached  the  saturation  point,  as
    • Mr.  Percival  calls  it  in  the  eleventh  chapter.

    Benoni  B.  Gattell

    New  York,  January  2,  1932.

What would you like to do?

Home > Flashcards > Print Preview