Chapter 4.2.2. Lysozyme illustrates how an Enzyme works.

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Chapter 4.2.2. Lysozyme illustrates how an Enzyme works.
2014-10-15 00:29:42
chapter 4.2.2
Starting with chapter 4.2.2 with Lysozymes.
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  1. What is a lysozyme?

    With what type of reaction does it break up the sugar?

    How does a lysozyme cleave a polysaccharide chain (4 steps)?
    An enzyme that serves as the antibiotic for saliva being able to sever the polysaccharide chains that form on the cell wall of bacteria.


    • 1. Lysozyme has a binding site on its surface (active site) that is a long grove able to hold six linked sugars in the polysaccharide.
    • 2. Enzyme substrate forms.
    • 3. The enzyme cuts the polysaccharide by hydrolysis.
    • 4. Enzyme-product complex dissociates releasing the product and the enzyme allowed to be used again.
  2. How is the chemistry that underlies the binding of lysozyme to its substrate is the same as that for antibody binding to its antigen?

    How does the lysozyme hold on to its polysaccharide substrate?

    Where is the bond to be broken held close to relative to the enzyme? Because of this, what happens activation energy of the reaction?
    There is the formation of noncovalent bonds.

    It holds it in such a way that one of the two sugars involved in the bond being broken is distorted  from its most stable shape.

    Next to two amino acid side chains of glutamic and aspartic acids located in the active site of the enzyme. It is greatly reduced.
  3. In reactions involving two or more substrates, the active site acts like what?

    The active site of an enzyme contains precisely what?

    What happens to the substrate when it binds to the enzyme? How?

    How do enzymes participate intimately in a reaction?
    A template or mold that brings reactants together in proper orientation for the reaction to occur. 

    Precisely positioned chemical groups that speed up a reaction by altering the distribution of electrons in the substrates.

    The shape of the substrate changes. By the bending of the bonds which drive the reaction to a specific transition state.

    By forming breef covalent bonds between the substrate and the amino acid side chain in the active site.