Oral Anatomy 3 - The Maxillary First Permanent Molar

Card Set Information

Author:
james14hunter
ID:
286660
Filename:
Oral Anatomy 3 - The Maxillary First Permanent Molar
Updated:
2014-10-22 11:05:14
Tags:
Oral Anatomy Maxillary First Permanent Molar
Folders:
Oral Anatomy 3 - The Maxillary First Permanent Molar
Description:
Oral Anatomy 3 - The Maxillary First Permanent Molar
Show Answers:

Home > Flashcards > Print Preview

The flashcards below were created by user james14hunter on FreezingBlue Flashcards. What would you like to do?


  1. How does the maxillary first permanent molar compare to the other molars?
    This is usually the largest molar in each quadrant.
  2. How does the maxillary first permanent molar appear when viewed occlusally?
    • Viewed occlusally, the crown is rhombic in outline.
    • The mesiopalatal and distobuccal angles are obtuse.
    • The longest diameter of the crown runs from the mesiobuccal to the distopalatal corners.
    • It has four major cusps separated by an irregular H-shaped occlusal fissure.
    • The occlusal table may be divided into two distinct components (the trigon and talon) by an oblique ridge, which passes diagonally across the occlusal table from the mesiopalatal cusp to the distobuccal cusp.
    • The oblique ridge may be crossed by a shallow fissure which connects the central fossa of the trigon with the distopalatal fissure and the distal pit of the talon, completing the H-shaped fissure pattern.
  3. What are the cusps of the maxillary first permanent molar like?
    • The misopalatal cusp is the largest, the buccal cusps being smaller and of approximately equal size.
    • The buccal cusps form the base of the trigon.
  4. What is the trigon of the maxillary first permanent molar?
    • The trigon bears the mesiobuccal, mesopalatal, and distobuccal cusps, and the talon bears the distopalatal cusp.
    • The trigon is characteristically triangular in shape, the apex of the triangle being directed palatally.
    • The buccal cusps form the base of thr trigon.
    • The mesial marginal ridge forms the mesial side of the trigon and its distal side is formed by the oblique ridge.
    • The trigon has a central fossa from which a fissure extends mesially to terminate in a mesial pit before the mesial marginal ridge.
    • Another fissure extends buccally from the central fossa to pass onto the buccal surface of the crown between the two buccal cusps.
  5. What is the tubercle of Carabelli?
    • An accessory cusplet of variable size may be seen on the palatal surface of the mesiopalatal cusp.
    • This cusplet is termed the tubercle of Carabelli, and is found on about 60% of maxillary first permanent molars.
  6. What are the trigon and the talon of the maxillary first permanent molar?
    • The occlusal table may be divided into two distinct components (the trigon and talon) by an oblique ridge, which passes diagonally across the occlusal table from the mesiopalatal cusp to the distobuccal cusp.
    • The trigon bears the mesiobuccal, mesopalatal, and distobuccal cusps, and the talon bears the distopalatal cusp.
    • The distopalatal cusp of the talon is generally the smallest cusp of the tooth and is separated from the mesiopalatal cusp by a distopalatal fissure, which curves distally to end in a distal pit before the distal marginal ridge.
  7. Concerning the crowns, what is a characteristic feature of the maxillary molars?
    The fact that the tips of the palatal cusps are situated nearer the mid-mesiodistal diameter of the crown than those of the buccal cusps is characteristic of maxillary molars.
  8. How does the maxillary first permanent molar appear from the buccal aspect?
    • From the buccal aspect, the buccal cusps are seen to be approximately equal in height, though the mesiobuccal cusp is wider than the distobuccal cusp.
    • The buccal surface is convex in its cervical third but relatively flat in its middle and occlusal thirds.
    • The buccal groove extends from teh occlusal table, passing between the cusps to end about halfway up the buccal surface.
    • The mesial profile is convex in its occlusal and middle thirds but flat, or even concave, in the cervical third.
    • The distal profile, on the other hand, is convex in all regions.
  9. How does the maxillary first permanent molar appear when viewed palatally?
    • Viewed palatally, the disproportion in size between the mesiopalatal and the distopalatal cusps is most evident.
    • The mesiopalatal cusp is blunt and occupies approximately three fifths of the mesiodistal width of the palatal surface.
    • The palatal surface is more or less uniformly convex in all regions.
    • A palatal groove extends from the distal pit onto the occlusal surface between the palatal cusps to terminate approximately halfway up the palatal surface.
  10. How does the maxillary first permanent molar appear from the mesial and distal aspects?
    • From the mesial and distal aspects, the maximum bucco-palatal dimension is at the cervical margin, from which the buccal and palatal profiles converge occlusally.
    • The mesial marginal ridge is more prominent than the distal ridge and may have a number of distinct tubercles although such tubercles are rare on the distal marginal ridge
  11. What is the cervical margin and the root like for a maxillary first permanent molar?
    • The cervical margin follows a fairly even contour around the tooth.
    • There are three roots, two buccal and one palatal, arising from a common root stalk.
    • the palatal root is the longest and strongest and is circular in cross section.
    • The buccal roots are more slnder and are flattened mesiodistally; the mesiobuccal root is usually the larger and wider of the two.
    • At the root stalk, the palatal root is more commonly related to the distobuccal root than to the mesiobuccal root.

What would you like to do?

Home > Flashcards > Print Preview