Oral Anatomy 3b - The Maxillary Second Permanent Molar

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james14hunter
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286661
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Oral Anatomy 3b - The Maxillary Second Permanent Molar
Updated:
2014-10-22 11:31:13
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Oral Anatomy 3b Maxillary Second Permanent Molar
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Oral Anatomy 3b - The Maxillary Second Permanent Molar
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Oral Anatomy 3b - The Maxillary Second Permanent Molar
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  1. How does the maxillary second permanent molar compare to the first?
    This closely resembles the maxillary first permanent molar but shows some reduction in size and slightly different cusp relationships.
  2. How does the maxillary second permanent molar appear when viewed occlusally?
    • Viewed occlusally, the rhomboid form is more pronounced than in the first molar and the oblique ridge is smaller.
    • The talon (distopalatal fissure cusp) is considerably reduced.
    • The occlusal fissure pattern is similar to that of the first molar but is more variable, and supplemental grooves are more numerous.
  3. Which two features of the buccal surface differentiate the second molar?
    The smaller size of the crown and the distobuccal cusp.
  4. How does the maxillary second permanent molar appear when viewed palatally?
    From the palatal view, the reduction in size of the distopalatal cusp is more visible.
  5. Is there a tubercle of Carabelli on the maxillary second permanent molar?
    The tubercle of Carabelli is not usually found on the mesiopalatal cusp.
  6. How do the mesial and distal surfaces differ from those of the first molar?
    They differ little, except that the tubercles on the mesial marginal ridge are less numerous and less pronounced.
  7. What are the roots like for the maxillary second permanent molar?
    • Like the first molar, the second molar has three roots, two buccal and one palatal .
    • However, they are shorter and less divergent than those of the first molar and may be partly fused.
    • The apex of the mesiobuccal root is generally in line with the centre of the crown, unlike that of the first molar, which generally lies in line with the tip of the mesiobuccal cusp.
  8. What variations in morphology can occur with maxillary second permanent molars?
    • Variations in morphology of the maxillary second permanent molar are quite common.
    • Total reduction of the distopalatal cusp such that only the trigon remains is frequent.
    • Less frequently , the crown may appear compressed because of fusion of the mesiopalatal and distobuccal cusps, resulting in an oval crown possessing three cusps in a straight line.

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