Antiarrythmics

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Anonymous
ID:
28744
Filename:
Antiarrythmics
Updated:
2010-08-02 16:06:20
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antiarrythmic drugs
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Questions about antiarrythimic drugs
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  1. What Vaughan-Williams classification is Quinidine?
    class 1A
  2. What Vaughan-Williams classification is Procainamide?
    class 1A
  3. What Vaughan-Williams classification is Disopyramide?
    class 1A
  4. What Vaughan-Williams classification is Lidocaine?
    class 1B
  5. What Vaughan-Williams classification is Mexiletine?
    class 1B
  6. What Vaughan-Williams classification is Tocainide?
    class 1B
  7. What Vaughan-Williams classification is Felcainide?
    class 1C
  8. What Vaughan-Williams classification is Moricizine?
    class 1C
  9. What Vaughan-Williams classification is Propafenone?
    class 1C
  10. What Vaughan-Williams classification is Diltiazem?
    class IV
  11. What Vaughan-Williams classification is Verapamil?
    class IV
  12. What Vaughan-Williams classification is Sotalol?
    Class III
  13. What Vaughan-Williams classification is Ibutilide?
    class III
  14. What Vaughan-Williams classification is Dofetilide?
    class III
  15. What Vaughan-Williams classification is Dofetilide?
    class III
  16. What Vaughan-Williams classification is Amiodarone?
    class III, but inhibits sodium and potassium channels, is non-competitive inhibitor of beta receptors, and inhibits calcium channels so really it is in all four classes.
  17. What Vaughan-Williams classification is Timolol?
    class II
  18. What Vaughan-Williams classification is Propranolol?
    class II
  19. What Vaughan-Williams classification is Pindolol?
    class II
  20. What Vaughan-Williams classification is Penbutolol?
    class II
  21. What Vaughan-Williams classification is Nadolol?
    class II
  22. What Vaughan-Williams classification is Metoprolol?
    class II
  23. What Vaughan-Williams classification is Labetalol?
    class II
  24. What Vaughan-Williams classification is Esmolol?
    class II
  25. What Vaughan-Williams classification is Carvedilol?
    class II
  26. What Vaughan-Williams classification is Carteolol?
    class II
  27. What Vaughan-Williams classification is Bisoprolol?
    class II
  28. What Vaughan-Williams classification is Betaxolol?
    class II
  29. What Vaughan-Williams classification is ATenolol?
    class II
  30. What Vaughan-Williams classification is Acebutolol?
    class II
  31. What is the mechanisim of action of class I arrythimics?
    sodium channel blockers which inhibit ventricular automaticity and slow ventricular conduction
  32. What subclass of class I is the most potent at slowing ventricular conduction?
    Class IC (Flecainide, Moricizine, Propafenone)
  33. What is sinus bradycardia?
    Arrythmia that originates in the sinoatrial (SA) node (pacemaker of the heart) that results in a slow sinus rate, which is defined as less than 60 beats per minute.
  34. What could cause sinus bradycardia?
    Those who partake in regualr vigourous exercise may have heart rates less than 60bpm, which for them is normal and healthy. If the cause is unknown or idiopathic, it is referred to as "sick sinus syndrome", which tends to occur with increasing age. Other causes may include MI, drugs, sleep apnea, hypothyroidism, hyokalemia or hyperkalemia.
  35. What are some drugs that could cause Sinus bradycardia?
    Amiodarone, B-blockers, cisplatin, citalopram, clonidine, cocaine, digoxin, diltiazem, donepezil, felcainid, fluoxetine, isradipine, nitroglyercin, propafenone, sotalol, thalidomide, verapamil
  36. What are symptoms of sinus bradycardia?
    may be asymptomatic especially for those whom this is normal, but can include dizziness, fatigue, lightheadedness, syncope, chest pain, and shortness of breath
  37. Does sinus bradycardia need to be treated?
    only if patients become symptomatic
  38. What are possible treatments of sinus bradycardia?
    If patient is on drug that causes bradycardia, discontinue the drug if possible. In cases where discontinuing the drug would shorten patient's life, a pacemaker can be installed.

    Acute treatment can be atropine 0.5mg IV every 3-5 minutes (monitor for adverse effects such as tachycardia, dry mouth, urinary retention, mydriasis). Max dose for atropine for those with sinus bradycardia is 2mg. If unresponsive and no temp or tranvenous pacing available, epinephrine (2 to 10mcg/minute titrate to response) and/or dopamine (2 to 10mcg/kg/minute) can be given.

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