Humanities 303 Midterm 1

Card Set Information

Humanities 303 Midterm 1
2014-10-29 19:58:14

Joel Westwood Humanities 303
Show Answers:

  1. Brave New World- John
    • Son of Director and Linda
    • Grew up outside of World State
    • Grew up on a reservation
  2. Brave New World- Bernard
    An alpha male who fails to fit in because of his physical stature
  3. Brave New World- Helmholtz
    An Alpha lecturer at the College of Emotional Engineering. He and Bernard are friends because they find common ground in their discontent with the World State, but Helmholtz’s criticisms of the World State are more philosophical and intellectual than Bernard’s more petty complaints.
  4. Brave New World- Lenina
    • A vaccination worker at the Central London Hatchery and Conditioning Centre
    • She is an object of desire for Bernard Marx and John
    • she is unable to share Bernard’s disaffection or to comprehend John’s alternate system of values.
  5. Brave New World- Mustapha Mond
    • The Resident World Controller of Western Europe, one of only ten World Controllers.
    • young scientist performing illicit research
    • When his work was discovered, he was given the choice of going into exile or training to become a World Controller. He chose to give up science, and now he censors scientific discoveries and exiles people for unorthodox beliefs
  6. Brave New World-Soma
    The drug soma is a symbol of the use of instant gratification to control the World State’s populace.
  7. Brave New World- Ford, “My Ford,” “Year of Our Ford,
    • Henry Ford, the early twentieth-century industrialist and founder of the Ford Motor Company, wherever people in our own world would say Lord”
    • religion has been replaced by reverence for technology
  8. Brave New World- Alpha, Beta, Gamma, Delta, or Epsilon
    • Alphas: destined to become the leaders and thinkers of the World State.
    • Epsilons: Epsilons, stunted and stupefied by oxygen deprivation and chemical treatments, are destined to perform menial labor.
    • Deltas: Deltas docile and eager consumers
  9. Stories typically transmit values
    in how they explain
    How things are

    How things work

    What to do about events/experiences
  10. Culture
    stories and messages that govern our conception of life and our behavior
  11. Gerbner’s “Cultivation Theory” as Applied to Television
    • Television provides “cultural environment” into which we are born
    • Television shapes and reinforces how
    • we perceive and understand the world.
  12. Men on Television
    • Men expected to undertake risky, aggressive behavior to earn success/recognition.
    • Men allowed greater control over what happens to them.
  13. Women on Television
    • Women frequently dependent, likely to be victimized
    • Women’s roles often appear more restrictive, provide less autonomy.
  14. Violence on Television
    • Television cultivates fear in its viewers: “I’m
    • at risk,” and I’m afraid of strangers.”
    • Because society is projected as a dangerous place on television,
  15. Casting and Fate on Television
    • Television shows relatively stable cast of characters; we forget plot specifics but
    • recall stories about people’s roles/fates
    • Casting and fate patterns affect our perceptions of how men and women behave and what
    • function(s) they perform
  16. Semiology
    • study of signs, how they function; semiotics = arrangement of signs to create
    • meaning
    • Written language, icons, logos, symbols, and architecture create/develop/reinforce
    • semiotic meaning
  17. Enlightenment
    • new scientific knowledge and
    • technological power expected to make comprehensive improvement in all the
    • conditions of life
    • Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Franklin
  18. Jefferson and Enlightenment
    • Jefferson believed factories should
    • stay in western Europe; America should avoid crowding/slumming, ignorance,
    • “mechanized life” resulting from large-scale manufacturing
  19. Franklin and Enlightenment
    • Franklin refused to patent/protect
    • his inventions, feeling that others’ lives should be improved by his labors,
    • just as he benefitted from work of previous generations
  20. Adversary culture”: aligned with romanticism and transcendentalism
    belief that tech and mechanistic practices can be oppressive (and thus we should return to nature, simplicity;minimize growth)
  21. Alvin M. Weinberg “Can Technology Replace
    Social Engineering?” (1966)
    Technological fix
    developing technologies and systems to reduce/minimized social, environmental problems
  22. Social engineering
    • changing people’s behavior in relation to problem
    • Laws/regulations, education, rewards and
    • punishments (subsidies and fines) compel citizens to “change behavior” to
    • respond to problems effectively
  23. Colonial tech hallmarks
    • objects are handcrafted
    • objects made of wood, natural elements 
    • goods made individually: make what you need
    • labor output directly related to value/price of product
    • tech development/change stems from artisans
  24. Innovation
    • “hubris”—potentially
    • dangerous or reckless pride
  25. Oil painting’s strengths
    Heightened pictorial likeness: realism or “verisimilitude” that evokes distinctive and natural color, texture, contour, space, weight, materiality—“tangibility.”
  26. Food Inc. Chapters
    • –From Fast Food to All Food
    • –A CORNucopia of Choices
    • –Unintended Consequences
    • –The Dollar Menu
    • –In the Grass
    • –Hidden Costs
    • –From Seed to the Supermarket
    • –The Veil
    • –Shocks to the System
    • –Power to the Consumer
  27. More’s fictional world:
    community stability through personal responsibility/self-control dominant ideology
  28. Conntemporary “Adtopia”
    having things/commodities brings happiness, fulfillment
  29. Golden Age
    • ideal existence/society before encroaching civilization corrupts natural perfection [Garden of Eden as depicted in Old Testament book
    • of Genesis, SLO during summer]
  30. Utopia
    perfectibility” of humanity displayed through rationalized achievement
  31. Utopian values
    • •Virtue:honesty, integrity, caring for others
    • •Labor: physical “work” to benefit community
    • •Study:individual and community improvement through intellectual pursuits: attending
    • lectures, refining one’s craft, artisanal skills
    • Monogamy:to reinforce family structure, eliminate pre-marital sex, sex with multiple
    • partners
    • •Idleness and “pride” eliminated through cultural norms and criminalization