Therapeutics - T1DM

Card Set Information

Author:
kyleannkelsey
ID:
290285
Filename:
Therapeutics - T1DM
Updated:
2014-11-30 17:29:59
Tags:
Therapeutics T1DM
Folders:
Therapeutics - T1DM
Description:
Therapeutics - T1DM
Show Answers:

Home > Flashcards > Print Preview

The flashcards below were created by user kyleannkelsey on FreezingBlue Flashcards. What would you like to do?


  1. What is the onset, peak and duration for Rapid acting insulins?
    • Onset: 5- 15 min
    • Peak: 45 - 90 min
    • DOA: 3 - 4 hr
  2. What is the onset, peak and duration for Regular insulin?
    • Onset: 30 - 60 min
    • Peak: 2 - 4 hr
    • DOA: 5 - 7 hr
  3. What is the onset, peak and duration for NPH?
    • Onset: 1 - 2 hr
    • Peak: 6 - 14 hr
    • DOA: 10-16 hr
  4. What is the onset, peak and duration for Basal insulin?
    • Onset: 2-4 hr
    • Peak: Peakless
    • DOA: 24 hr
  5. What is the goal preprandial glucose?
    70-130
  6. What is the goal bedtime glucose?
    110-150
  7. What is the goal A1C?
    <7
  8. Describe the schedule for a conventional insulin therapy:
    • Before breakfast: NPH and Rapid (2/3 daily insulin)
    • Before Dinner: NPH and Rapid (1/3 daily insulin)
  9. Describe the schedule for a Method 2 Intensive insulin therapy:
    • Before breakfast: NPH and Rapid (2/3 daily insulin)
    • Before Dinner: Rapid (1/6 daily insulin)
    • Bedtime: NPH (1/6)
  10. Describe the schedule for a Method 3 Intensive insulin therapy:
    • Before breakfast: Rapid (17% daily insulin)
    • Before Lunch: Rapid (16% daily insulin)
    • Before Dinner: Rapid (16% daily insulin)
    • Bedtime: NPH (50%)
  11. When using method 3 (intensive) and the AM glucose is high, what action do we take?
    Increase the basal
  12. What are the S/S of overinsulinemia?
    • Weight gain over the past several months
    • Frequent hypoglycemic reactions.
    • "Brittle" control, where blood glucose concentrations
    • Normal A1C levels indicate that mean glucose concentrations are within the normal range even though numerous high glucose levels are recorded
  13. How do you treat overinsulinemia?
    Reduce dose by 10%
  14. What are the S/S of Hypoglycemia?
    • Blurred vision, generalized sweating, tremor, hunger, sweaty palms, a cold feeling, headache, and palpitation. Nightmares and night sweats
    • leads to: reduced cerebral function manifested by lethargy, confusion, agitation, and nervousness
    • Ultimately, convulsions, with stupor, and coma can occur.
  15. How do you treat Hypoglycemia?
    • Rule of 15:
    • If glucose < 70 mg/dL, treat with 15 gm of rapidly absorbed CHO (½ cup of orange juice, non-diet soda, or 3-4 glucose tablets)
    • Check glucose again in 15 minutes; if still < 70, eat another 15 gm CHO and re-check glucose in 15 minutes
    • Repeat as needed until glucose is in goal range
    • If a meal is not scheduled in the next hour or so, a small snack consisting of complex
    • For the unconscious patient, a 1 mg dose of glucagon can be given SQ, IM, or IV. Patient should be placed face down to protect the airway if vomiting occurs.
  16. What is the general method of sliding scale insulin?
    1 to 2 U of regular insulin are administered for every 30 to 50 mg/dL above a predetermined target glucose concentration

What would you like to do?

Home > Flashcards > Print Preview