TAP LA FINAL SET THREE

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shockwave
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TAP LA FINAL SET THREE
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2015-01-18 18:01:00
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TAP LA FINAL SET THREE
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  1. council and counsel.
    COUNCIL is a committee elected to lead or govern.

    • COUNSEL is advice (usually legal advice).
    • To counsel is to advise. THINK COUNSEL AS TO LEGAL
  2. DO YOU CAPITALIZE THE NAMES OF LANGUAGES?
    YES.

    English, French, Polish
  3. THEN VS THAN
    Then (rhymes with Jen) is a word that’s used to mark time, or show a sequence of events.

    Than (rhymes with Jan) is used to make comparisons and only to make comparisons. Anytime you use than, you should be able to substitute the words “compared with” or “in comparison to.” If it doesn’t work, you probably meant to say “then.”
  4. Find the principal parts of the verb "be".

    I ____________ here now. 
    (present tense)
    I ____________ here in the past 
    (past tense)
    I have ___________ here every day. 
    (past participle)
    • am here now. 
    • (present tense)

    • was here in the past. 
    • (past tense)

    • I have been here every day.
    •  (past participle)
  5. Neither she nor they were willing to predict the election results.

     Neither she nor they was willing to predict the election results.

    WHAT'S THE RIGHT ONE?
    WERE

    When a singular subject and a plural subject are connected by nor, the noun closer to the verb (“were”) determines whether the verb is singular or plural.
  6. Nora, of all the candidates who are running, is the best.

     Nora, of all the candidates who is running, is the best.
    Nora, of all the candidates who are running, is the best.

    Explanation: “Nora” is the subject of the main clause: “Nora is the best”; “who” refers to “candidates,” so the correct verb is “are running.”
  7. It was she.
     It was her.

    WHAT IS RIGHT?
    It was she.

    • “she” is the predicate nominative renaming the subject “it.”
  8. It is I.
    It is me.

    WHAT IS RIGHT?
    It is I.

    “I” is the predicate nominative renaming the subject “it.”
  9. That caller was I, not he.

    That caller was me, not him.

    WHAT IS RIGHT?
    That caller was I, not he.

    “I” and “he” are predicate nominatives, renaming the subject, “caller.”
  10. She was one of those cruise passengers who are always complaining.

    She was one of those cruise passengers who is always complaining.

    WHAT IS CORRECT?
    ARE

    “who,” the subject of the verb “are complaining”, refers to “passengers,” not to “one.”
  11. Julia is a faster runner than I.
    Julia is a faster runner than me.

    WHAT IS RIGHT?
    Julia is a faster runner than I.

    The sentence is saying, “Julia is a faster runner than I am.”
  12. T OR F

    If the subject does not appear in front of the second verb, a comma is generally unnecessary.
    TRUE

    He thought quickly but still did not answer correctly.

  13. T OR F?
    Use commas to set off expressions that interrupt the sentence flow:
    nevertheless,
    after all,
    by the way,
    on the other hand,
    however, etc.
    TRUE 

     I am, by the way, very nervous about this.
  14. ARE THESE CORRECT?

    Will you, Aisha, do that assignment for me?
    Yes, old friend, I will.
    Good day, Captain.
    YES

    Use commas to set off the name, nickname, term of endearment, or title of a person directly addressed.
  15. T OR F?
    If the quotation comes before he said, she wrote, they reported, Dana insisted, or a similar attribution, end the quoted material with a comma, even if it is only one word.
    • TRUE
    • Examples:
    • "I don't care," he said.
    • "Stop," he said.
  16. If you do not have two subjects and two verbs separated by the FANBOYS, 

    DO YOU NEED A COMMA BEFORE FANBOYS?
    NO.

    ONLY USE A COMMA IN FRONT OF FANBOYS IF YOU HAVE TWO COMPLETE THOUGHTS. READ AFTER FANBOYS. IF IT DOES NOT MAKE SENSE, DO NOT USE A COMMA. 

  17. WHEN IS IT CORRECT TO USE:
    ,HOWEVER,
    when however means “though” or “nonetheless,” (WHICH MEANS: in spite of what has just been said) it is generally preceded and followed by a comma.

     I would be hesitant, however, to take the trip alone.
  18. A -------- may be used between independent clauses joined by a connector, such as and, but, or, nor, etc., when one or more commas appear in the first clause.
    SEMICOLON

    Example: When I finish here, and I will soon, I'll be glad to help you; and that is a promise I will keep.
  19. We ask, therefore, that you keep this matter confidential.

    OR 

    We ask; therefore, that you keep this matter confidential.
    We ask, therefore, that you keep this matter confidential.

    Do not use semicolons where commas can do the job. IT DOES NOT ALWAYS HAVE TO A SEMICOLON BEFORE IT.

    it is preferable to use a semicolon before, and a comma after, introductory words such as however, therefore, for example when they introduce a complete sentence.

    The order was requested six weeks ago; therefore, I expected the shipment to arrive by now.
  20. A----- instead of a ------- may be used between independent clauses when the second sentence explains, illustrates, paraphrases, or expands on the first sentence.
    A colon instead of a semicolon may be used between independent clauses when the second sentence explains, illustrates, paraphrases, or expands on the first sentence.

    EX: He got what he worked for: he really earned that promotion.
  21. IS THIS RIGHT:

    They were missing a few things on their camping trip; namely, they forgot sunscreen, towels, and firewood.
    YES

    Use a semicolon before certain introductory words (“namely”) that precede a complete sentence.
  22. DO YOU CAPITALIZE HOLIDAYS?
    YES
  23. CAPITALIZE Days of the week and months of the year?
    YES
  24. Capitalize titles when they are used before names, unless the title is followed by a comma.
    Chairman of the Board William Bly will preside at the conference.

    The chairman of the board, William Bly, will preside.
  25. Do not capitalize the title if it is used after a name or instead of a name.
    The governors, lieutenant governors, and attorneys general called for a special task force.

    Governor Fortinbrass, Lieutenant Governor Poppins, and Attorney General Dalloway will attend.
  26. Capitalize relatives' family names when: --they immediately precede a personal name, --when they are used alone in place of a  personal name.

    However, these monikers are not capitalized with:
    -possessive nouns or pronouns,
    -when they follow the personal name, or
    -when they are not referencing a specific  person.
    • Examples:
    • I found out that Mom is here.
    • You look good, Grandpa.
    • Andy and Opie loved Aunt Bee's apple pies.

    • Examples:
    • My mom is here.
    • Joe's grandpa looks well.
    • The James brothers were notorious robbers.
    • There's not one mother I know who would allow that.
  27. Do not capitalize city, town, county, etc., if it comes before the proper name.
    • Examples:
    • the city of New York
    • New York City
    • the county of Marin
    • Marin County
  28. CAPITALIZE MAN-MADE TERRITORIES
    Berlin, Montana, Cook County
  29. ANY MORE AND ANYMORE
    • ANY MORE: "any additional"
    • I don't need any more help.

    • ANYMORE: "any longer"
    • I don't need help anymore.

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