TAP LA FINAL SET FOUR

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shockwave
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TAP LA FINAL SET FOUR
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2015-03-20 17:58:10
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TAP LA FINAL SET FOUR
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  1. I cannot be calm on roller coasters.

    OR

    I can not be calm on roller coasters.
    I cannot be calm on roller coasters.

    Explanation: cannot is a single word.
  2. Among VS Between
    Among refers to three or more objects or groups.

    Between refers to exactly two objects or groups.
  3. Perform VS Preform
    "Perform" means "to do" something.
  4. "BOTH" ALWAYS TAKES A _______ VERB?
    PLURAL
  5. "EVERYTHING" SINGULAR OR PLURAL?
    SINGULAR
  6. T OR F
    Two singular subjects connected by 
    or,
    either/or, 
    neither/nor 
    require a singular verb.
    • TRUE 
    • My aunt or my uncle is arriving by train today.
    • Neither Juan nor Carmen is available.
    • Either Kiana or Casey is helping today with stage decorations.
  7. T OR F?
    The verb in an or, either/or, or neither/nor sentence agrees with the noun or pronoun closest to it.
    • TRUE 
    • Neither the plates nor the serving bowl goes on that shelf.
    • Neither the serving bowl nor the plates go on that shelf.
  8. T OR F ?
    As a general rule, use a plural verb with two or more subjects when they are connected by and.
    • TRUE
    • Example: A car and a bike are my means of transportation.

    • But note these exceptions:
    • Breaking and entering is against the law.

    The bed and breakfast was charming.

    In those sentences, breaking and entering and bed and breakfast are compound nouns.
  9. With words that indicate portions—a lot, a majority, some, all, etc.
    WHAT IS THE RULE?
    • We are guided by the noun after "of". If the noun after of is singular, use a singular verb. If it is plural, use a plural verb.
    • A lot of the pie has disappeared.
    • A lot of the pies have disappeared.
    • third of the city is unemployed.
    • third of the people are unemployed.
    • All of the pie is gone.
    • All of the pies are gone.
    • Some of the pie is missing.
    • Some of the pies are missing.
  10. In sentences beginning with here or there, the true subject ------- the verb.
    • FOLLOW
    • There are four hurdles to jump.
    • There is a high hurdle to jump.
    • Here are the keys.
  11. The word ----- replaces --- in sentences that express a wish or are contrary to fact.
    WERE REPLACES WAS.

    • EX: I wish it were Friday.
  12. They need to know that they won’t be layed off before they use their credit cards.
    A) be laid
    B) been layed
    C) been laid
    The correct choice is A.

    WHEN REFERENCING EMPLOYMENT, USE LAY/LAID. 

    The correct verb form in this situation is: lay, laid, have laid
  13. Car manufacturers who now use computers and robots formerly used thousands of personel.
    A) personal
    B) personnel
    C) personell
    B. PERSONNEL

  14. The source, usually located below the table, told you how reliable the information is and where to find the original. 
    A) tells
    B) tell
    C) will tell
    D) is telling
    A) tells

    **SUBJECT VERB AGREEMENT***

    Since the subject of the sentence is "source," the verb must be singular. Remember that verbs in the present tense that are singular end in "s."
    (this multiple choice question has been scrambled)
  15. Everyday vs. every day

    Everyday is an adjective used to describe things that (1) occur every day, or (2) are ordinary or commonplace.

    Every day, the adjective every modifies the noun day, and the phrase usually functions adverbially.

    When you’re not sure which one to use, try replacing everyday/every day with each day. If each day would make sense in its place, then you want the two-word form. 

    Everyday, meanwhile, is synonymous with daily or ordinary, depending on its sense.
  16. Already vs. all ready

    • Already is an adverb. It means either (1) by a specified time, or (2) so soon.
    •  
    • ALL READY means completely prepared, or it’s used to indicate that everyone in a group is prepared.
  17. WHEN DOES ONE CAPITALIZE A TITLE?
    Capitalize titles when they are used before names, unless the title is followed by a comma, THEN DO NOT CAPITALIZE.Do not capitalize the title if it is used after a name or instead of a name.

    The president will address Congress.

    Chairman of the Board William Bly will preside at the conference.

    The chairman of the board, William Bly, will preside.

    The senators from Iowa and Ohio are expected to attend.

    Also expected to attend are Senators Buzz James and Eddie Twain.
  18. ANY MORE AND ANYMORE
    ANY MORE = IN ADDITION

    ANYMORE = ANY LONGER
  19. Each and Every

    EACH = REFERRING TO AN INDIVIDUAL AS ONE.

    EVERY = A GROUP LUMPED TOGETHER AS ONE.
  20. ALL TOGETHER VS ALTOGETHER
    ALL TOGETHER = EVERYONE TOGETHER. IF YOU CAN USE TOGETHER, THEN USE ALL TOGETHER. 

    ALTOGETHER = COMPLETE, ENTIRELY
  21. AFFLICT VS INFLICT
    Afflict =  To afflict is to cause suffering, pain, or misery. It’s often associated with medical conditions. Afflict is often, but not always, followed by the preposition with.

    • Inflict means to force pain or suffering, like if you smack someone upside the head.
    • Inflict is meaner.
    • It's more aggressive — it actively hurts and causes problems. A self-inflicted wound is when you hurt yourself. Inflict is often, but not always, followed by on.

    When you force an undesirable or harmful event on someone, you inflict it on them. You might prefer that someone inflict some physical pain on you rather than inflict you with the boredom of another trip to the annual flower show.
  22. ADOPTED VS ADOPTIVE
    • Adopted
    • The adjective adopted pertains to the person who has been adopted. THINK KIDS.
    • Ex: Charles loved his adopted daughter as if she were his own.

    • Adoptive
    • The adjective adoptive pertains to the person who has adopted. THINK PARENTS.
    • Ex: Rebecca loved her adoptive father as if he were her own.
  23. COMMA AND THE NAME OF THE STATE. NAME THE TWO WAYS.
    Punctuation must always follow a state name when that name follows a city—except in postal addresses.

    The concert will be held in Chicago, Illinois, on August 12. 

    The letter was addressed to Mrs. Marion Heartwell, 1881 Pine Lane, Palo Alto, California 95824. NO COMMA BEFORE OR AFTER THE ZIP CODE!
  24. THE 3 WAYS TO USE A SEMICOLON.
    1. to separate independent clauses not joined by a coordinating conjunction (FANBOYS).

    2. to separate independent clauses separated by a conjunctive adverb (HOWEVER).

    3. to separate items in a series with internal commas.
  25. WHICH ONE IS CORRECT?

    My favorite holidays are: Christmas, New Year's Eve, and Halloween.

    My favorite holidays are Christmas, New Year's Eve, and Halloween.
    My favorite holidays are Christmas, New Year's Eve, and Halloween.

    In standard English the colon should only be used after statements that are grammatically complete. Do not use a colon after a verb or a preposition.
  26. CONVERT THESE TO THE PLURAL POSSESSIVE:

    MAN 
    CHILD
    BROTHER-IN-LAW
    SOMEONE ELSE
    • Add s to plural nouns not ending in s:
    • men's room
    • children's toys

    • Add s to the last word in compound words or groups:
    • brother-in-law's car
    • someone else's paper
  27. T OR F 
    Semicolons and colons are always placed outside of quotation marks?
    • TRUE
    • We have to "pull ourselves up by our bootstraps"; we can't just talk about our plans.
  28. WHICH ONE IS CORRECT?
    She thought out loud "Will I ever finish this project in time for that class?".

    She thought out loud "Will I ever finish this project in time for that class?"
    She thought out loud "Will I ever finish this project in time for that class?"

    use only one mark of punctuation at the end of sentence ending with a quotation mark.
  29. Much vs. Many

    • Much 
    • is used with uncountable SINGULAR nouns.

    • Many 
    • is used with countable PLURAL nouns
  30. Few vs. Little

    • Few is used with countable nouns.
    • Little is used with uncountable nouns.
  31. PRINCIPLE VS PRINCIPAL
    PRINCIPLE =LAW OR TENET OF BEHAVIOUR.

    PRINCIPAL = AMOUNT BORROWED ON A LOAN OR HEAD OF SCHOOL

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