Ch. 9 Campaigns and Elections Quiz

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Ch. 9 Campaigns and Elections Quiz
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Ch. 9
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  1. When citizens vote for president and vice president, they are actually voting for ___ who will cast ballots on the citizens' behalf.

    a. delegates
    b. nominating committee members
    c. electors
    d. election board members
    electors
  2. If a state has 16 members in the U.S. House of Representatives, it has ___ electoral votes.

    a. 10
    b. 18
    c. 8
    d. 16
    18
  3. The electoral college system is primarily a winner-take-all system, which means that 

    a. a political party must receive 538 electoral votes in order to "win it all," that is, to win control of both the White House and Congress.
    b. the candidate who receives the most popular votes nationwide receives all of the electoral votes.
    c. the candidate who receives the largest popular vote in a state is credited with all that state's electoral votes.
    d. a candidate must win all of the electoral votes in order to become president.
    the candidate who receives the largest popular vote in a state is credited with all that state's electoral votes.
  4. The only states that are exceptions to the electoral college's winner-take-all system are ___ and ___.

    a. Maine; Nebraska
    b. New York; California
    c. Michigan; Ohio
    d. Indiana; Florida
    Maine; Nebraska
  5. In order to become president, a candidate must receive more than half of the ___ available electoral votes.

    a. 635
    b. 270
    c. 538
    d. 435
    538
  6. What happens if no presidential candidate gets an electoral college majority?

    a. a joint session of Congress is held to select the president.
    b. The Senate votes on the candidates, with each senator casting one vote.
    c. The vice-presidential candidate who receives a clear majority of the votes becomes president.
    d. The House of Representatives votes on the candidates, with each state delegation casting only a single vote.
    The House of Representatives votes on the candidates, with each state delegation casting only a single vote.
  7. The congressional caucus system collapsed in 1824, because it was widely seen as 

    a. undemocratic.
    b. favoring the Federalist Party.
    c. inefficient.
    d. favoring the Jeffersonian Republican Party.
    undemocratic.
  8. Those who are chosen to represent a particular geographic area at a political party's nominating convention are called

    a. conventioneers.
    b. delegates.
    c. candidates.
    d. electors.
    delegates
  9. In ___, voters choose delegates, who in turn choose the candidates.

    a. a congressional caucus
    b. an indirect primary
    c. a direct primary
    d. a general election
    an indirect primary
  10. Which of the following statements about an open primary is TRUE?

    a. Voters must declare their party affiliation on Election Day.
    b. Independent voters must register with a party before the polls open in order to be allowed to vote.
    c. Republican and Democratic candidates are listed on the same ballot.
    d. Voters can vote for a party's candidates regardless of whether they belong to the party.
    Voters can vote for a party's candidates regardless of whether they belong to the party.
  11. In an effort to make their primaries prominent in the media and influential in the political process, many states have moved the date of their primary to earlier in the year--a practice known as

    a. front-loading
    b. fast-out-of-the-gate.
    c. heavy-lifting.
    d. first-past-the-post.
    front-loading.
  12. ___ now manage nearly all aspects of a presidential candidate's campaign.

    a. Delegate committees
    b. PACs
    c. Political party chairpersons
    d. Professional political consultants
    Professional political consultants
  13. The comprehensive plan developed by a candidate and his or her advisers for winning an election is most commonly called the

    a. campaign strategy.
    b. campaign blueprint.
    c. media blitz.
    d. political game plan.
    campaign strategy.
  14. ___ is best defined as the attempt to learn damaging information about an opponent in a political campaign.

    a. Micro-targeting
    b. Credentialing
    c. Opposition research
    d. Front-loading
    Opposition research
  15. Which of the following is NOT an accurate account of how opposition research was used during the 2011-2012 political season?

    a. Obama supporters attempted to use opposition research to define Romney as a cold-hearted businessman.
    b. Independent political activists played a relatively modest role while much of the opposition research was undertaken by the candidates' campaigns.
    c. Republican candidates used their opposition research funding to undermine other Republican candidates.
    d. Republican candidates had little reason to fund opposition research on President Obama because it had already been done in 2008.
    Independent political activists played a relatively modest role while much of the opposition research was undertaken by the candidates' campaigns.
  16. Which of the following presidents won the presidential election largely due to his effective use of a new communication medium?

    a. Richard Nixon
    b. George W. Bush
    c. Calvin Coolidge
    d. John F. Kennedy
    John F. Kennedy
  17. Barack Obama's online operation in 2011-2012 made a major contribution to his ___ fund-raising total.

    a. $66 million
    b. $1.25 billion
    c. $16 million
    d. $500 million
    $1.25 billion
  18. The online ___ technique has been described as "a one-day fundraising frenzy."

    a. moneybomb
    b. social media mining
    c. microtargeting
    d. e.politico
    moneybomb
  19. Which of the following statements about recent political fundraising efforts is TRUE?

    a. Barack Obama pioneered the online "moneybomb" fundraising technique in 2008.
    b. In 2012, Mitt Romney was more reliant on the Internet fund-raising than many other recent candidates.
    c. At the time of the 2010 midterm elections, Republicans were widely perceived as unable to successfully use the Internet for campaign fundraising.
    d. One of the defining characteristics of the Obama campaign's fundraising has been its decentralization.
    One of the defining characteristics of the Obama campaign's fundraising has been its decentralization.
  20. The Federal Election Campaign Act, as amended in 1974, provides federal funding for presidential general election expenses if candidates agree to 

    a. prevent corporations from participating both directly and indirectly in their campaigns.
    b. accept campaign-spending limits.
    c. pay back at least 25% of the funds after the election is over.
    d. disclose all contributions and expenditures of more than $1,000.
    accept campaign-spending limits.
  21. Campaign contributions not regulated by federal law, such as some contributions that are made to political parties instead of to particular candidates, are known as

    a. independent expenditures.
    b. moneybombs.
    c. soft money.
    d. hard money.
    soft money
  22. Which of the following statements about the Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act of 2002 is TRUE?

    a. It banned soft money.
    b. It gave corporations, labor unions, or nonprofit groups the unlimited ability to fund campaign advertising.
    c. It outlawed "issue advocacy" groups.
    d. It banned PAC contributions.
    it banned soft money
  23. After the passage of the Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act of 2002, "issue advocacy" groups exploited loopholes in the Act by establishing independent ___, which could "advocate positions" but were not allowed to "expressly advocate" voting for specific candidates.

    a. 501c committees
    b. super PACs
    c. 501(c)3 organizations
    d. 527 committees
    527 committees
  24. In Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission (2010), the Supreme Court held that 

    a. presidential candidates could no longer receive federal funding for expenses incurred during general election campaigns.
    b. corporations and other organizations could run issue ads that attack, praise, or advocate voting for specific candidates.
    c. Congress could not ban soft money.
    d. interest groups could not engage in issue advocacy.
    corporations and other organizations could run issue ads that attack, praise, or advocate voting for specific candidates.
  25. By 2011, as a result of the Supreme Court Citizens United v. FEC ruling,

    a. corporate cash flooded into the political system at unprecedented levels.
    b. billionaire contributors backed Republican candidates, but not Democrats.
    c. super PACs formed for every major presidential candidate.
    d. wealthy individuals ceased contributions to super PACs.
    super PACs formed for every major presidential candidate.

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