Philosophy Exam 1 Questions

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Philosophy Exam 1 Questions
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Questions from Philosophy Exam 1
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  1. Before philosophy began with the pre-Socratic philosophers, the ancient Greeks understood nature and their place in it through...
    A) the myths about the gods as told through Homer's epic poetry
    B) a rational principle that explains the relationship between the one and the many
    C) the myths about the gods as told by the poet Hesiod
    D) A & C
    D
  2. Hesiod's Theogeny tells the story about:
    A) The story of Adam and Eve
    B) The genesis of the gods
    C) The big bang theory
    D) The Trojan War
    B
  3. According to Hesiod's Theogeny, the cause of earth and heaven is...
    A) Zeus
    B) Chaos
    C) Water
    D) Kronos
    B
  4. According to Hesiod's Theogeny, heaven and earth give birth to...
    A) The Olympian gods such as Zeus, Poseidon, and Hades
    B) The Titans such as Kronos, Rhea, and Prometheus
    C) Greeks such as Achilles, Odysseus, and Hector
    D) Philosophers such as Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle
    B
  5. According to Hesiod's Theogeny, Kronos and Rhea give birth to...
    A) The Olympian gods such as Poseidon, Zeus, and Hades
    B) The Titans such as Kronos, Rhea, and Prometheus
    C) Greeks such as Achilles, Odysseus, and Hector
    D) Philosophers such as Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle
    A
  6. According to Hesiod's Theogeny, what causes Kronos to want to eat his children?
    A) Parmenides' claim that the one and not the many exists
    B) A rational principle underlying the nature of reality
    C) A prophecy that one of his children will him
    D) A prophecy that he is the wisest of all men
    C
  7. According to Hesiod's Theogeny, after Zeus kills his father how is the natural world divided amongst Zeus's brothers?
    A) Zeus rules the seas and oceans, Hades rule the heavens, and Poseidon rules the underworld
    B) Zeus rules the seas heavens, Poseidon rule the seas and oceans, and Hades rules the underworld
    C) Zeus, Poseidon, and Hades share in ruling over the earth
    D) B & C
    D
  8. According to Greek myth, what is the cause of the Trojan War?
    A) a rational principle underlying the nature of reality
    B) A prophecy of patricide
    C) Chaos
    D) A beauty competition between Athena, Hera, and Aphrodite
    D
  9. The Greek myth about the golden apple characterizes the gods as:
    A) Humble and brave
    B) Wise and all-powerful
    C) Vain and fearful
    D) Trustworthy and trusting
    C
  10. Pre-Socratic philosophy begins with:
    A) Hesiod circa 800BC
    B) Thales of Miletus circa 600BC
    C) Socrates circa 450BC
    D) Plato circa 400BC
    B
  11. The Pre-Socratic philosophers found Greek myth unsatisfactory because...
    A) Zeus's lightning bolts struck only those who were unjust
    B) The myths demanded a standard of morality too high for human being to achieve
    C) The myths did not offer a clear casual explanation for changes in the natural world
    D) It makes sense that if there is an all powerful god, then there must be more than one
    C
  12. According to Thales, the unifying casual principle that explains the connection between the many changes we observe in the natural world is...
    A) Earth
    B) Air
    C) Fire or Flux
    D) Water
    D
  13. According to Thales, the unifying casual principle that explains the connection between the many changes we observe in the natural world must be...
    A) Infinite
    B) Something that is diverse enough to unify the many changes we observe in nature
    C) The cause of all of life
    D) B & C
    D
  14. According to Heraclitus, the unifying casual principle that explains the connection between the many changes we observe in the natural world is...
    A) Atoms and void
    B) Fire or Flux
    C) Only the one and not the many exists
    D) The infinite
    B
  15. According to Heraclitus...
    A) You cannot step into the same river twice
    B) The one cause of the many is Kronos
    C) Only the one and not the many exists
    D) You cannot step into the same river once
    A
  16. According to Anaximander, Thales' principle cannot explain the cause of...
    A) What is wet
    B) What is hot
    C) What is dry
    D) What is cold
    C
  17. According to Anaximander, the unifying casual principle that explains the connection between the many changes we observe in the natural world is...
    A) Atoms and void
    B) The infinite
    C) That only the one and not the many exists
    D) Fire or Flux
    B
  18. According to Anaximander, what would happen if there did not exist something that has neither a beginning nor an end to it?
    A) No casual explaination could account for a first cause
    B) Some casual explanations could account for a first cause
    C) Every casual explanation could account for a first cause
    D) None of the above
    A
  19. Anaximander's principle explains change by appeal to what?
    A) The conflict between Olympian gods
    B) The swirling vortex theory that like seeks like
    C) The theory that there is order out of opposition
    D) A rational principle that rejects what the senses can tell us
    B
  20. Who argued that words paper make sense to us only because they are both straight and crooked?
    A) Thales
    B) Anaximander
    C) Heraclitus
    D) Parmenides
    C
  21. According to Parmenides, if the many exists, then the many must be separated by...
    A) The void
    B) "What is"
    C) "What is not"
    D) The principle that like seeks like
    C
  22. According to Parmenides, what happens when we try to think or talk about what is not?
    A) We black out and mumble
    B) We think and talk of nothing rather than something
    C) We think and talk of something rather than nothing
    D) We sink deeper into the nothingness of existence
    C
  23. According to Parmenides, if everything is and nothing is not, then...
    A) nothing is, and the many changes and differences we see, like death, are illusions
    B) There is order (one) out of opposition (of the many)
    C) Change, and death are real
    D) You can step into the same rive twice
    A
  24. According to Parmenides,...
    A) You cannot step into the same river twice
    B) The one cause of the many is Kronos
    C) There is order out of disposition
    D) You cannot step into the same river once
    D
  25. Zeno, a disciple of Parmenides, argued that if it is true that to move from point A to B one must first move half the distance, and that we can forever divide any distance in half, then what follows?
    A) Achilles will catch the tortoise
    B) We must appeal to our senses to understand the nature or reality
    C) Motion is impossible
    D) There is a unity between what we can see and what we can reason
    C
  26. The view that knowledge of reality must appeal to reason alone and not the senses is called...
    A) Empiricism
    B) Rationalism
    C) Determinism
    D) Relativism
    B
  27. According to Hegel and Kierkegaard, the art of tragedy and comedy both involve a combination of...
    A) The epic and lyric modes of poetry
    B) The one and the many
    C) Atoms and void
    D) Lots of blood and laughter
    A
  28. According to Hegel and Kierkegaard, the epic represents...
    A) The shared values and commitments that unify a community
    B) The individual's freedom to create a world of his or her own
    C) An either/ or question about the cause of the tragedy
    D) The conflict and concrete reconciliation of ethical duties
    A
  29. According to Hegel and Kierkegaard, the lyric represents...
    A) The shared values and commitments that unify a community
    B) The individual's freedom to create a world of his or her own reality
    C) An either/or question about the cause of the tragedy
    D) The conflict and concrete reconciliation of ethical duties
    B
  30. According to Hegel, the aim of tragic art is to represent...
    A) The shared values and commitments that unify a community
    B) The individual's freedom to create a world of his or her own reality
    C) An either/or question about the cause of the tragedy
    D) The conflict and concrete reconciliation of ethical duties
    D
  31. According to Hegel, the suffering in Antigone is expressed by...
    A) The state's power to put Antigone to death
    B) The power of the family that Creon feels from losing his
    C) Antigone as a passive object of her epic background
    D) A & B
    D
  32. According to Kierkegaard, the aim of tragic art is to represent...
    A) The shared values and commitments that unify a community
    B) The individual's freedom to create a world of his or her own
    C) An either/or question about the cause of the tragedy
    D) The conflict and concrete reconciliation of ethical duties
    C
  33. According to Kierkegaard, the suffering in Antigone is expressed by...
    A) The state's power to put Antigone to death
    B) The power of the family that Creon feels from losing his
    C) Antigone as a passive object of her epic background
    D) A & B
    C
  34. If the tragic poet places too much emphasis on the lyric element, then the hero's guilt will be clear. If the tragic poet places too much emphasis on the epic element, then the hero's innocence will be clear. Between these two extremes lies the tragic. This view belongs to...
    A) Aristotle
    B) Freud
    C) Hegel
    D) Kierkegaard
    D
  35. According to Kierkegaard, that Hamlet swears upon the fire tongue expresses...
    A) A comic contraction caused by the shared values and commitments that unify a community
    B) A comic contradiction caused by the lyric (subjective) misunderstanding the epic (objective)
    C) A comic contradiction expressed as an either/or question about the cause of laughter
    D) The comic contradiction and reconciliation of ethical duties
    B
  36. In Aristophane's Assembly Women, why is Praxagora's proposal that the women should rule the city accepted at the Assembly?
    A) Because women give back what they borrow from and owe to others
    B) Because women know best how to manage the household and the city is just one big house
    C) Because it was the only thing left that the men hadn't tried
    D) All of the above
    D
  37. In Aristophane's Assembly Women, what is the cause of crime and social instability in the city?
    A) That everyone has an equal share of the basic necessities for human existence
    B) The need first to make money in order to satisfy one's most basic needs
    C) Communism
    D) A & C
    B
  38. In Aristophane's Assembly Women, what is Praxagora's solution to crime and social instability? Why wont there be any theft, mugging, perjury, gambling, prostitution, and so on?
    A) Because everyone already owns an equal share of everything he or she needs
    B) Because of the need first to make money in order to satisfy one's most basic needs
    C) Communism
    D) A & C
    D
  39. In Aristophane's Assembly Women, what problem confronts Praxagora's solution?
    A) That everyone has an equal share of the basic necessities for human existence
    B) The need first to make money in order to satisfy one's most basic needs
    C) The unequal share of sex between the young and beautiful citizens and the old and ugly citizens
    D) A & B
    C
  40. In Aristophanes' Assembly Women, how does Praxagora address this problem?
    A) A new law that makes prostitution illegal
    B) A new law that makes prostitution legal
    C) A new law that requires young beauties to sleep with old uglies before the young sleep with each other
    D) All of the above
    C

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