Derm1- Topical Therapies

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  1. What are the big categories of topical therapies? (4)
    keratoseborrheic disorders, infectious dermatitis, allergic dermatitis, otitis externa
  2. What are clinical signs of keratinization disorders? (3)
    scaling(dandruff), oiliness/odor, recurrent infections
  3. What products are commonly used to combat keratinization disorders?
    keratolytic, keratoplastic, antiseborrheic
  4. How do keratolytic products work?
    help remove excess scale either by increasing desquamation or by reducing intercellular cohesion
  5. How to keratoplastic products work?
    regulate skin cell proliferation (cytostatic effect on basal cells), reducing their rate of division
  6. What are antiseborrheic products useful for?
    reduce sebum, degreasing
  7. What active ingredients are useful for treating keratinization disorders? (5)
    • sulphur 
    • salicylic acid 
    • benzoyl peroxide
    • selenium sulfide 
    • ceramides/fatty acids
  8. What is sulphur useful for? What is its mechanism?
    keratinization disorders; keratolytic, keratoplastic (not good for oiliness)
  9. What is salicylic acid useful for? What is its mechanism?
    keratinization disorders; keratolytic, often used with sulfur
  10. What is benzoyl peroxide useful for? What is its mechanism?
    keratinization disorders, bacterial infections; keratolytic, follicular flushing, degreasing, antibacterial
  11. What is selenium sulfide useful for? What is its mechanism?
    keratinization disorders; keratolytic, keratoplastic, degreasing
  12. What is ceramides/fatty acids useful for? What is its mechanism?
    keratinization disorders, allergies; restructure stratum corneum, control sebum production, control microbial flora, moisturizer
  13. What is chlorhexidine useful for? What is its mechanism?
    bacterial infections, fungal infections; broad spectrum antimicrobial, antifungal, fungistatic against Malassezia
  14. What concentration of chlorhexidine should be used if it is the sole active ingredient?
    3%
  15. What is Nisin useful for? What is its mechanism?
    bacterial infections; antimicrobial- binds to lipid precursor and disrupts cell membrane production [useful for animal that have reaction to chlorhexidine]
  16. What is ethyl lactate 10% useful for? What is its mechanism?
    bacterial infections; antibacterial- hydrolyzed in skin to ethanol and lactic acid, lowering skin pH
  17. What is silver sulfadiazine useful for? What is its mechanism?
    bacterial infections; antimicrobial- acts on cell membrane to inhibit protein synthesis
  18. What is Mupirocin useful for? What is its mechanism?
    bacterial infections- only use in cases of resistant infection- MRSA; antimicrobial- inhibits cell wall formation
  19. What are the 3 major active ingredients in combating yeast infections (dermatophytosis and Malassezia)? How do they work?
    Miconazole, Climbazole, Ketoconazole- inhibit synthesis of ergosterol (component of fungal cell membrane)
  20. What is lime sulphur useful for?
    antifungal, antibacterial, antiparasitic (superficial mites)
  21. What is pramoxine 1% useful for?
    mild inflammation/itchiness due to allergies
  22. What is oatmeal shampoo useful for?
    mild inflammation/itchiness due to allergies
  23. What are the 3 levels of topical steroids? What is a drug in each level?
    • low potency- hydrocortisone
    • intermediate potency- prednisolone, triamcinolone, dexamethasone
    • high potency- betamethasone, flucinolone
  24. What is a key point for using topical steroids?
    not for long term use, except hydrocortisone (only use 2 a week at most); if must start with high potency, switch to lower potency after 2 weeks
Author:
Mawad
ID:
314756
Card Set:
Derm1- Topical Therapies
Updated:
2016-01-26 15:41:24
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vetmed derm1
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vetmed derm1
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