Derm3- LA Skin Neoplasia

Home > Preview

The flashcards below were created by user Mawad on FreezingBlue Flashcards.


  1. What is the etiologic agent of bovine squamous papilloma/fibropapilloma?
    Bovine Papillomavirus (1-6)
  2. How is bovine papillomavirus transmitted, and in what animals does it usually cause disease?
    • direct contact, abrasions
    • cattle <2 years old
  3. How does bovine papillomavirus appear grossly?
    horny, dry, cauliflower-like warts on head, neck, shoulders, and dewlap +/- papillomas on teats/udders/genitalia
  4. What does bovine papillomavirus look like on histopath?
    well differentiated keratinocytes forming papillary projections +/- fibrous core
  5. Describe the behavior and therapy for bovine papillomavirus.
    benign; usually spontaneously resolve within 6 months, surgical excision for solitary papillomas in adults
  6. What is the etiology of bovine squamous cell carcinoma?
    variable, chronic sunlight exposure of a white-faced animal
  7. What is the gross appearance of bovine SCC?
    plaques early then becomes ulcerated mass later
  8. Describe the behavior of bovine SCC.
    malignant, highly locally invasive with late metastasis
  9. What is the etiology of equine squamous papillomas?
    equine papillomavirus
  10. How is equine papillomavirus transmitted?
    fly bites (vector borne)
  11. Describe the incidence of cutaneous papillomatosis and aural plaques.
    • both are caused by equine papillomavirus andĀ raised masses on muzzle, legs, distal limbs, genitalia
    • Cutaneous papillomatosis: horses < 3 yrs
    • Aural plaques: older horses
  12. Describe the behavior of equine squamous papillomas.
    • cutaneous papillomatosis: spontaneous regression in 1-6 months
    • aural plaques: persist
  13. What is the etiology of equine SCC?
    chronic sunlight exposure
  14. What is the incidence of equine SCC?
    lightly pigmented breeds are predisposed, older horses
  15. Describe the grossĀ appearance of equine SCC?
    ulcerated mass, mucocutaneous junctions (esp. lightly pigmented)
  16. Describe the behavior of equine SCC.
    malignant, highly locally invasive with late local lymph node metastasis
  17. What is the treatment for equine SCC?
    surgical excision +/- cryotherapy, radiotherapy, chemotherapy
  18. What is the etiology of equine sarcoids?
    bovine papillomavirus 1 or 2
  19. What is the incidence of equine sarcoids?
    VERY COMMON in horses <6 years old (can happen at any age)
  20. What are the possible gross appearances of equine sarcoids? (4)
    • verrucous- dry horny, sessile
    • fibroblastic- granulation tissue-like
    • combination of both
    • occult- flat, looks like thick skin with rough surface
  21. What are the common locations of equine sarcoids? (5)
    head, eyelids, ears, penile sheath, lower limb
  22. Describe the behavior of equine sarcoids.
    locally invasive and destructive but DO NOT metastasize
  23. What is the therapy for equine sarcoids?
    surgical excision +/- adjunct therapy
  24. What is the etiology of cutaneous melanoma in horses?
    spontaneous
  25. What is the incidence of cutaneous melanoma in horses?
    exceptionally common in older grey horses
  26. Describe the gross appearance of cutaneous melanoma in horses.
    pigmented nodules on the perineum, under the tail, pinnae, periocular, distal limbs, prepuce
  27. Describe the behavior of equine cutaneous melanoma.
    often benign at initial presentation but many will eventually metastasize and become malignant
  28. What is the therapy for equine cutaneous melanoma? (4)
    surgical excision curative with early lesions, cryotherapy, local chemotherapy, immunotherapy
  29. What is the etiology of equine mast cell tumors?
    spontaneous
  30. Describe the cytologic appearance of equine mast cell tumors.
    well-differentiated mast cells with eosinophils
  31. What is the behavior of equine mast cell tumors?
    generally benign
  32. What is the therapy for equine mast cell tumors?
    surgical excision is usually curative
  33. What is the subtype of the majority of cutaneous lymphomas?
    T cell-rich, B cell lymphomas (TCRBCL)
  34. Describe the behavior of equine cutaneous lymphoma.
    guarded prognosis
  35. What is the etiology of equine eosinophilic nodular disease?
    unknown, but suggestive of a hypersensitivity reaction
  36. What are the 3 indistinct presentations of equine eosinophilic nodular disease?
    equine nodular eosinophilic granuloma, axillary nodular necrosis, unilateral papular dermatosis
  37. What differentials should you consider when you see ulcerative nodular lesion on the wither or dorsum of a horse? (4)
    • nodular necrobiosis collagenolytic granuloma (eosinophilic nodular disease)
    • mast cell tumor
    • Habronemiasis
    • pythium insidiosum
  38. What is the therapy for nodular necrobiosis collagenolytic granuloma (eosinophilic nodular disease)?
    corticosteroids
  39. What is the etiology of equine cutaneous habronemiasis?
    hypersensitivity reaction to aberrant larvae of the stomach worms, which are deposited by flies
  40. What is the gross appearance of cutaneous habronemiasis in horses?
    "summer sores" at the medial canthus, glans penis, prepuce, distal limbs- ulcerated red brown mass-like lesions (looks like granulation tissue)
  41. Describe the histological appearance of cutaneous habronemiasis.
    eosinophilic granulomatous inflammation and granulation tissue and nematode larvae
  42. What is the etiology of phycomycosis?
    pythium insidiosum
  43. What is the incidence of phycomycosis?
    subtropical regions- most common in horses exposed to bodies of stagnant water
  44. What is the gross presentation of equine phycomycosis?
    ulcerated, proliferative masses with draining tract and contain necrotic casts ("leeches" or "kunkers")
  45. What is the histologic appearance of equine phycomycosis?
    eosinophilic and granulomatous inflammation with granulation tissue and hyphae
  46. What is the therapy and prognosis for equine phycomycosis?
    complete surgical excision;prognosis decline with size and duration of lesions
  47. What is the cause of exuberant granulation tissue in horses?
    excessive deposition of granulation tissue, likely due to continued wound traction/ damage and/ or wound infection
  48. What is the incidence of proud flesh in horses?
    very common after injury on the limbs
  49. What is the therapy for exuberant granulation tissues in horses?
    surgical excision if possible

Card Set Information

Author:
Mawad
ID:
318380
Filename:
Derm3- LA Skin Neoplasia
Updated:
2016-04-04 01:51:16
Tags:
vetmed derm3
Folders:

Description:
vetmed derm3
Show Answers:

Home > Flashcards > Print Preview