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  1. 973. three means by which American artists became aware of European art movements
    visiting Europe, migrant European artists, and exhibitions in New York City (UARG:84,2,2)
  2. 974. Regionalism
    an American art movement that focused on rejecting European influences in the early 1900s (UARG:85,1,1)
  3. 975. another name for the Regionalist movement
    American Scene painting (UARG:85,1,1)
  4. 976. three Regionalist painters
    Grant Wood, Thomas Hart Berton, and John Steuart Curry (UARG:85,1,1)
  5. 977. region with which the Regionalist movement was associated
    the Midwest (UARG:85,1,1)
  6. 978. lifestyle with which the Regionalist movement was associated
    rural life (UARG:85,1,1)
  7. 979. With what description did Time magazine praise the Regionalist movement in 1934?
    “truly American” (UARG:85,1,2)
  8. 980. Regionalist artist featured on the cover of Time magazine in 1934
    Thomas Hart Benton (UARG:85,1,2)
  9. 981. demographic that dominated the Regionalist movement
    white men (UARG:85,1,2)
  10. 982. social perspective most common in Regionalist art
    white male perspective (UARG:85,1,2)
  11. 983. two aspects of Georgia O’Keefe’s work that qualify as “abstract”
    expressive use of color and focus on detail (UARG:85,2,0)
  12. 984. American Gothic
    a famous Grant Wood painting (UARG:85,2,1)
  13. 985. Grant Wood’s town of birth
    Amamosa, Iowa (UARG:85,2,2)
  14. 986. What impression did Grant Wood try to evoke in photographs of himself?
    that of the rural worker (UARG:85,2,2)
  15. 987. two opposing ways to interpret American Gothic
    reverential image of the American heartland or satirical and perhaps critical commentary on rural life (UARG:85,2,1)
  16. 988. How did Grant Wood give the impression of being a rural worker in photographs?
    posing in overalls (UARG:85,2,2)
  17. 989. town to which Grant Wood moved after his father’s death
    Cedar Rapids, Iowa (UARG:85,2,2)
  18. 990. After what event did Grant Wood begin taking formal art lessons?
    his father’s death (UARG:85,2,2)
  19. 991. school at which Grant Wood enrolled after high school
    Minneapolis School of Design and Handicraft (UARG:85,2,3)
  20. 992. three subjects Grant Wood studied at the Minneapolis School of Design and Handicraft
    metalworking, jewelry making, and woodworking (UARG:85,2,3)
  21. 993. aesthetic that influenced Grant Wood during his studies at the Minneapolis School of Design and Handicraft
    Arts and Crafts (UARG:85,2,3)
  22. 994. city to which Grant Wood moved in 1913
    Chicago (UARG:85,2,4)
  23. 995. school at which Grant Wood studied in Chicago
    School of the Art Institute of Chicago (UARG:85,2,4)
  24. 996. job Grant Wood took while studying in Chicago
    teaching (UARG:85,2,4)
  25. 997. two styles of art Grant Wood studied in Europe
    Impressionism and Post‐Impressionism (UARG:85,2,4)
  26. 998. European tendency that Grant Wood rejected
    abstraction (UARG:85,2,4)
  27. 999. art movement with which Grant Wood gained some familiarity in Europe
    Modernism (UARG:85,2,4)
  28. 1000. two aspects of American art that Regionalists believed should reflect the American experience
    subject matter and style (UARG:86,1,0)
  29. 1001. northern Renaissance artist who influenced Grant Wood
    Jan Van Eyck (UARG:86,1,0)
  30. 1002. Stone City Art Colony
    Depression‐era organization that gave artists residencies (UARG:86,1,1)
  31. 1003. With what organization did Grant Wood work in the summers of 1932 and 1933?
    Stone City Art Colony (UARG:86,1,1)
  32. 1004. region in which Stone City Art Colony was located
    rural Iowa (UARG:86,1,1)
  33. 1005. subject that Grant Wood taught at Stone City Art Colony
    painting (UARG:86,1,1)
  34. 1006. state that Grant Wood oversaw for the Public Works of Art Project in 1935
    Iowa (UARG:86,1,1)
  35. 1007. Where did Grant Wood first meet the artists he employed for the Public Works of Art Project?
    working at Stone City Art Colony (UARG:86,1,1)
  36. 1008. university at which Grant Wood taught painting
    University of Iowa (UARG:86,1,2)
  37. 1009. number of years that Grant Wood was on the University of Iowa faculty
    8 (UARG:86,1,2)
  38. 1010. age at which Grant Wood passed away
    50 (UARG:86,2,0)
  39. 1011. What trend in artistic styles caused Grant Wood’s work to be dismissed in the 1940s?
    move toward abstraction (UARG:86,2,0)
  40. 1012. What THREE shortcomings did art critics attribute to Grant Wood’s work in the 1940s?
    naïve, folksy, and overly simplistic (UARG:86,2,0)
  41. 1013. Why did Midwesterners continue to support Grant Wood’s work in the 1940s?
    upheld traditional values endangered in modern times (UARG:86,2,1)
  42. 1014. two subjects in the foreground of American Gothic
    man and woman (UARG:86,2,2)
  43. 1015. two subjects in the background of American Gothic
    farmhouse and barn (UARG:86,2,2)
  44. 1016. What architectural feature stands out in the farmhouse in American Gothic?
    a Gothic‐style window (UARG:86,2,2)
  45. 1017. How are the figures in American Gothic posed?
    stiffly, as if for a photograph (UARG:86,2,3)
  46. 1018. How much of the figures’ bodies are visible in American Gothic?
    the waist up (UARG:86,2,3)
  47. 1019. How would a 1930s audience have viewed the clothing of the figures in American Gothic?
    old‐fashioned and conservative (UARG:86,2,3)
  48. 1020. three garments worn by the woman in American Gothic
    dress, cameo pin, and apron (UARG:86,2,3)
  49. 1021. three garments worn by the man in American Gothic
    work shirt, overalls, and jacket (UARG:86,2,3)
  50. 1022. farming implement held by the man in American Gothic
    pitchfork (UARG:86,2,3)
  51. 1023. What sort of expression do the figures in American Gothic have?
    serious or emotionless (UARG:86,2,4)
  52. 1024. How does the gaze of the man differ from that of the woman in American Gothic?
    is looking directly at the viewer (UARG:86,2,4)
  53. 1025. What attitude does the direct gaze of the man in American Gothic indicate?
    strong patriarchy (UARG:87,1,0)
  54. 1026. What attitude does the position of the pitchfork in American Gothic indicate?
    the man protecting the woman (UARG:87,1,0)
  55. 1027. items on the porch of the farmhouse in American Gothic
    potted plants (UARG:87,1,1)
  56. 1028. What two aspects of the farmhouse window in American Gothic indicate a Gothic style?
    the pointed arch and tripartite division (UARG:87,1,1)
  57. 1029. object hanging in the farmhouse window in American Gothic
    a brown and white patterned cloth (UARG:87,1,1)
  58. 1030. object partly visible on the farmhouse roof in American Gothic
    a lightening rod (UARG:87,1,1)
  59. 1031. What kind of building do the lightening rod and window in American Gothic evoke?
    a church (UARG:87,1,1)
  60. 1032. What feature of the farmhouse is evoked by the thin faces of the figures in American Gothic?
    the window (UARG:87,1,2)
  61. 1033. What feature of the woman’s outfit does her face echo in American Gothic?
    the cameo pin (UARG:87,1,2)
  62. 1034. What TWO features of the man’s outfit does the pitchfork echo in American Gothic?
    the stitching on his overalls and the stripes on his shirt (UARG:87,1,2)
  63. 1035. What feature of the farmhouse does the pitchfork echo in American Gothic?
    the divisions of the window (UARG:87,1,2)
  64. 1036. What TWO purposes does repetition serve in American Gothic?
    unifying the features of the painting and showing that the image was carefully constructed (UARG:87,1,2)
  65. 1037. What false impression about Grant Wood does the careful detail in American Gothic create?
    that he was a self‐taught or naïve painter (UARG:87,1,3)
  66. 1038. What artistic tradition is reflected by the careful detail in American Gothic?
    northern Renaissance art (UARG:87,1,3)
  67. 1039. person on whom the woman in American Gothic was based
    Grant Wood’s younger sister, Nan (UARG:87,2,1)
  68. 1040. person on whom the man in American Gothic was based
    Grant Wood’s dentist, Byron McKeeby (UARG:87,2,1)
  69. 1041. location of the house that formed the basis for American Gothic
    Eldon, Iowa (UARG:87,2,1)
  70. 1042. architectural style of the farmhouse in American Gothic
    Gothic revival (UARG:87,2,1)
  71. 1043. Which organization held the competition in which Grant Wood entered American Gothic?
    the Art Institute of Chicago (UARG:87,2,2)
  72. 1044. prize that American Gothic won in the Art Institute of Chicago’s competition
    bronze medal (UARG:87,2,2)
  73. 1045. amount of money Grant Wood won for American Gothic in the Art Institute of Chicago’s competition
    $300 (UARG:87,2,2)
  74. 1046. organization that purchased American Gothic
    the Art Institute of Chicago (UARG:87,2,2)
  75. 1047. amount of money for which the Art Institute of Chicago purchased American Gothic
    $300 (UARG:87,2,2)
  76. 1048. Daughters of the American Revolution
    a satirical Grant Wood painting (UARG:87,2,2)
  77. 1049. H. W. Jansen
    an influential art historian who rejected Grant Wood’s work (UARG:87,2,3)
  78. 1050. With what artistic tradition did H. W. Jansen equate Grant Wood’s work?
    the Nazis’ heroic nationalism (UARG:87,2,3)
  79. 1051. Georgia O’Keefe
    a famous 20th century painter (UARG:88,1,1)
  80. 1052. decade in which Georgia O’Keefe rose to prominence
    the 1920s (UARG:88,1,1)
  81. 1053. Georgia O’Keefe’s city of birth
    Sun City, Wisconsin (UARG:88,1,2)
  82. 1054. school at which Georgia O’Keefe began taking art classes in 1905
    the School of the Art Institute of Chicago (UARG:88,1,2)
  83. 1055. school at which Georgia O’Keefe enrolled in 1907
    the Art Students League (UARG:88,1,2)
  84. 1056. city to which Georgia O’Keefe moved from New York City in 1908
    Chicago (UARG:88,1,2)
  85. 1057. job Georgia O’Keefe took in Chicago in 1908
    commercial artist (UARG:88,1,2)
  86. 1058. state to which Georgia O’Keefe moved from Chicago
    Texas (UARG:88,1,2)
  87. 1059. job Georgia O’Keefe initially took in Texas
    art teacher (UARG:88,1,2)
  88. 1060. university at which Georgia O’Keefe’s interest in art was rekindled
    University of Virginia (UARG:88,1,3)
  89. 1061. Arthur Wesley Dow
    an artist who mentored Georgia O’Keefe (UARG:88,1,3)
  90. 1062. Arthur Stieglitz
    • an influential art dealer and photographer who promoted and later married
    • Georgia O’Keefe (UARG:88,1,3)
  91. 1063. Anna Pollitzer
    • a friend of Georgia O’Keefe’s who first showed her work to Arthur Stieglitz
    • (UARG:88,1,3)
  92. 1064. 291 (gallery)
    a famous Arthur Stieglitz art gallery (UARG:88,1,3)
  93. 1065. two subjects Georgia O’Keefe painted in the 1920s
    plants and New York architecture (UARG:88,1,5)
  94. 1066. Georgia O’Keefe’s preferred medium
    oil paint (UARG:88,1,5)
  95. 1067. region of the United States to which Georgia O’Keefe traveled in 1929
    the Southwest (UARG:88,2,1)
  96. 1068. What kind of landscape inspired Georgia O’Keefe in the Southwest?
    the desert (UARG:88,2,1)
  97. 1069. three cities Georgia O’Keefe visited in her first trip to the Southwest United States
    Albuquerque, Santa Fe, and Taos (UARG:88,2,1)
  98. 1070. After what event did Georgia O’Keefe relocate permanently to New Mexico?
    Arthur Stieglitz’s death (UARG:88,2,1)
  99. 1071. Which part of the year did Georgia O’Keefe spend in New Mexico from 1929 to 1949?
    summer (UARG:88,2,1)
  100. 1072. How did Georgia O’Keefe’s New Mexico paintings differ from her New York paintings?
    more abstract (UARG:88,2,1)
  101. 1073. What feature did Georgia O’Keefe’s New Mexico and New York paintings have in common?
    landscape and architecture as subjects (UARG:88,2,1)
  102. 1074. What TWO themes did Georgia O’Keefe’s abstract style focus on?
    undulating forms and evocative colors (UARG:88,2,1)
  103. 1075. What organization held a 1943 retrospective of Georgia O’Keefe’s work?
    the Art Institute of Chicago (UARG:88,2,2)
  104. 1076. What museum held a 1946 retrospective of Georgia O’Keefe’s work?
    the Museum of Modern Art (UARG:88,2,2)
  105. 1077. significance of Georgia O’Keefe’s 1946 Museum of Modern Art retrospective
    the museum’s first retrospective dedicated to a female artist (UARG:89,1,0)
  106. 1078. What physical limitation did Georgia O’Keefe begin to suffer in the 1970s?
    poor eyesight (UARG:89,1,1)
  107. 1079. Juan Hamilton
    a potter who worked with Georgia O’Keefe late in her career (UARG:89,1,1)
  108. 1080. What medium did Georgia O’Keefe begin to work with in the 1970s?
    clay (UARG:89,1,1)
  109. 1081. Cow’s Skull with Calico Roses
    a famous painting by Georgia O’Keefe (UARG:89,1,2)
  110. 1082. Why does the appearance of the skull in Cow’s Skull with Calico Roses stand out?
    larger than life (UARG:89,1,2)
  111. 1083. What process does the appearance of the skull in Cow’s Skull with Calico Roses imply it has undergone?
    bleaching in the sun (UARG:89,1,2)
  112. 1084. What style characterizes the background of Cow’s Skull with Calico Roses?
    abstract (UARG:89,1,2)
  113. 1085. number of roses in Cow’s Skull with Calico Roses
    two (UARG:89,1,2)
  114. 1086. Near what TWO parts of the skull are the roses situated in Cow’s Skull with Calico Roses?
    the snout and the right horn (UARG:89,1,2)
  115. 1087. What painting style characterizes Cow’s Skull with Calico Roses?
    linear (UARG:89,1,3)
  116. 1088. What aspect of Cow’s Skull with Calico Roses provides a sense of volume?
    subtle gradations of light and dark (UARG:89,1,3)
  117. 1089. object dominating the center of Cow’s Skull with Calico Roses
    the skull (UARG:89,1,3)
  118. 1090. How are objects clearly delineated in Cow’s Skull with Calico Roses?
    firm outlines (UARG:89,1,3)
  119. 1091. What feature of Cow’s Skull with Calico Roses interrupts the painting’s symmetry?
    the thick, dark line that bifurcates the composition (UARG:89,1,3)
  120. 1092. role of the thick, dark line behind the skull in Cow’s Skull with Calico Roses
    creates negative space (UARG:89,1,3)
  121. 1093. What characteristic distinguishes Georgia O’Keefe’s work?
    her use of color (UARG:89,1,4)
  122. 1094. four vibrant colors Georgia O’Keefe frequently used
    red, green, blue, and yellow (UARG:89,1,4)
  123. 1095. What colors are contrasted in Cow’s Skull with Calico Roses?
    white, black, and grey (UARG:89,1,4)
  124. 1096. What effect makes the skull stand out in Cow’s Skull with Calico Roses?
    the contrast of the skull’s white with the background’s grays (UARG:89,1,4)
  125. 1097. European term for the inclusion of a skull in a painting
    momento mori (UARG:89,1,5)
  126. 1098. What purpose did momento mori play in European painting?
    a reminder of man’s mortality (UARG:89,1,5)
  127. 1099. How does Georgia O’Keefe play on the tradition of momento mori?
    portraying cow skulls rather than human skulls (UARG:89,1,5)
  128. 1100. What process is portrayed in Georgia O’Keefe’s painting of cow skulls?
    the natural passage of life (UARG:89,1,5)
  129. 1101. Why is Georgia O’Keefe NOT considered a Regionalist painter?
    focuses on the Southwest instead of the Midwest (UARG:89,2,1)
  130. 1102. Thomas Hart Benton
    a famous 20th century painter (UARG:89,2,2)
  131. 1103. How did Thomas Hart Benton’s experience as a Regionalist differ from that of Grant Wood?
    lived long enough to see Regionalism fall out of favor (UARG:89,2,2)
  132. 1104. Thomas Hart Benton’s town of birth
    Neosho, Missouri (UARG:89,2,3)
  133. 1105. What kind of school did Thomas Hart Benton attend in his youth?
    military school (UARG:89,2,3)
  134. 1106. Why was Thomas Hart Benton sent to military school?
    His father expected him to have a military or political career. (UARG:89,2,3)
  135. 1107. Thomas Hart Benton’s uncle’s position
    Senator (UARG:89,2,3)
  136. 1108. school in which Thomas Hart Benton enrolled in 1907
    the School of the Art Institute of Chicago (UARG:89,2,4)
  137. 1109. In what city did Thomas Hart Benton live from 1908 to 1912?
    Paris (UARG:89,2,4)
  138. 1110. In what city did Thomas Hart Benton settle upon his return to the United States in 1912?
    New York City (UARG:89,2,4)
  139. 1111. Rita Piacensa
    Thomas Hart Benton’s wife (UARG:89,2,4)
  140. 1112. original nature of the relationship between Thomas Hart Benton and Rita Piacensa
    teacher and student (UARG:89,2,4)
  141. 1113. Why did Thomas Hart Benton return to Missouri in 1924?
    to care for his dying father (UARG:89,2,5)
  142. 1114. project that Thomas Hart Benton was chosen to execute in 1932
    painting a series of murals about Indiana (UARG:90,1,0)
  143. 1115. event at which Thomas Hart Benton’s Indiana murals were first displayed
    the Chicago World’s Fair (UARG:90,1,0)
  144. 1116. Why were Thomas Hart Benton’s Indiana murals controversial?
    depicted unpleasant moments in Indiana’s history (UARG:90,1,0)
  145. 1117. two unpleasant historical events depicted in Thomas Hart Benton’s Indiana murals
    the Ku Klux Klan and the forced removal of Native Americans (UARG:90,1,0)
  146. 1118. two unpleasant contemporary conditions depicted in Thomas Hart Benton’s Indiana murals
    labor riots and unemployment lines (UARG:90,1,0)
  147. 1119. Thomas Hart Benton’s signature style in presenting his artwork
    brutal honesty (UARG:90,1,0)
  148. 1120. How does Grant Wood’s depiction of the Midwest differ from that of Thomas Hart Benton?
    more idealistic and pastoral (UARG:90,1,0)
  149. 1121. The Social History of the State of Missouri
    a famous Thomas Hart Benton mural cycle (UARG:90,2,0)
  150. 1122. building for which Thomas Hart Benton painted The Social History of the State of Missouri
    the Missouri State Capitol building (UARG:90,2,0)
  151. 1123. Jackson Pollock
    a famous Abstract Expressionist painter who studied under Thomas Hart Benton (UARG:90,2,1)
  152. 1124. school at which Thomas Hart Benton taught from 1926 to 1935
    the Art Students’ League (UARG:90,2,1)
  153. 1125. school at which Thomas Hart Benton taught from 1935 to 1941
    the Kansas City Art Institute (UARG:90,2,1)
  154. 1126. Why was Thomas Hart Benton fired from the Kansas City Art Institute in 1941?
    offensive statements he had made publicly (UARG:90,2,1)
  155. 1127. Thomas Craven
    an art critic who supported Thomas Hart Benton (UARG:90,2,2)
  156. 1128. Why did Thomas Hart Benton’s association with Thomas Craven become problematic in the 1940s?
    Thomas Craven was openly anti‐Semitic. (UARG:90,2,2)
  157. 1129. The Departure of the Joads
    a famous Thomas Hart Benton lithograph (UARG:90,2,3)
  158. 1130. novel that The Departure of the Joads illustrates
    The Grapes of Wrath (UARG:90,2,3)
  159. 1131. Between which TWO states are the Joads traveling in the scene depicted in The Departure of the Joads?
    Oklahoma and California (UARG:90,2,3)
  160. 1132. What kind of moon is depicted in The Departure of the Joads?
    crescent (UARG:90,2,3)
  161. 1133. condition of the farmland in The Departure of the Joads
    barren (UARG:90,2,4)
  162. 1134. building in The Departure of the Joads
    a small, ramshackle house (UARG:90,2,4)
  163. 1135. Why is the portrayal of the figures in The Departure of the Joads unusual stylistically?
    no faces are visible (UARG:90,2,4)
  164. 1136. vehicle in The Departure of the Joads
    a truck (UARG:90,2,4)
  165. 1137. effect of obscuring the figures’ faces in The Departure of the Joads
    leaving the image open to interpretation (UARG:90,2,4)
  166. 1138. activity of the men in The Departure of the Joads
    loading the family’s possessions onto the truck (UARG:90,2,5)
  167. 1139. Where is the woman located in The Departure of the Joads?
    sitting on the running board of the truck (UARG:90,2,5)
  168. 1140. Which character is most likely the woman in The Departure of the Joads?
    Rose of Sharon (UARG:90,2,5)
  169. 1141. two characters represented by the children in The Departure of the Joads
    Winfield and Ruthie (UARG:91,1,0)
  170. 1142. What characteristic is implied by the passive poses of the woman and children in The Departure of the Joads?
    lack of agency (UARG:91,1,0)
  171. 1143. What attitude is implied by the figures conversing in the middle of The Departure of the Joads?
    the anxiety associated with change (UARG:91,1,0)
  172. 1144. Which character is most likely the figure sitting by the house in The Departure of the Joads?
    Muley Graves (UARG:91,1,0)
  173. 1145. company that commissioned Thomas Hart Benton to make promotional images for the film The Grapes of Wrath
    Twentieth Century‐Fox (UARG:91,1,1)
  174. 1146. number of illustrations Thomas Hart Benton made of The Grapes of Wrath for Twentieth Century‐Fox
    six (UARG:91,1,1)
  175. 1147. company that commissioned Thomas Hart Benton to illustrate a special edition of The Grapes of Wrath
    the Limited Edition Club (UARG:91,1,1)
  176. 1148. number of illustrations Thomas Hart Benton made of The Grapes of Wrath for the Limited Edition Club
    61 (UARG:91,1,1)
  177. 1149. three attitudes towards moving west represented in The Departure of the Joads
    confidently moving forward, hesitating, and steadfastly remaining at home (UARG:91,1,2)
  178. 1150. Jacob Lawrence
    a famous 20th century painter (UARG:91,2,1)
  179. 1151. And the Migrants Kept Coming
    a famous Jacob Lawrence painting (UARG:91,2,1)
  180. 1152. How did Jacob Lawrence’s perspective differ from that of the Regionalist painters?
    was African‐American (UARG:91,2,1)
  181. 1153. What event does the series that includes And the Migrants Kept Coming portray?
    the African‐American migration out of the South between the World Wars (UARG:91,2,1)
  182. 1154. two means through which the series that includes And the Migrants Kept Coming was shown to the general public
    publication in a popular magazine and an exhibition tour (UARG:91,2,1)
  183. 1155. Jacob Lawrence’s city of birth
    Atlantic City, New Jersey (UARG:91,2,2)
  184. 1156. What event led to Jacob Lawrence living in foster care in his childhood?
    his parents’ separation (UARG:91,2,2)
  185. 1157. Where did Jacob Lawrence began taking formal art classes?
    Harlem (UARG:91,2,2)
  186. 1158. museum at which Jacob Lawrence spent his free time in his youth
    the Metropolitan Museum of Art (UARG:91,2,2)
  187. 1159. New Negro Movement
    a group of African‐American artists, musicians, and writers who worked in Harlem during the 1920s and 1930s (UARG:91,2,3)
  188. 1160. Alain Locke
    an African‐American philosopher who coined the term “New Negro Movement” with his book (UARG:91,2,3)
  189. 1161. “The Negro Speaks of Rivers”
    a famous Langston Hughes poem (UARG:91,2,3)
  190. 1162. Charles Alston
    a muralist who mentored Jacob Lawrence (UARG:91,2,4)
  191. 1163. Augusta Savage
    a sculptor who mentored Jacob Lawrence (UARG:92,1,0)
  192. 1164. two places where Jacob Lawrence studied with Charles Alston
    the Utopia Children’s House and the Harlem Art Workshop (UARG:92,1,0)
  193. 1165. At which branch of the New York Public Library did Jacob Lawrence study in the 1930s?
    the 135th Street Branch (UARG:92,1,0)
  194. 1166. name eventually given to the 135th Street Branch of the New York Public Library
    Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture (UARG:92,1,0)
  195. 1167. school at which Jacob Lawrence continued his studies in 1936
    the American Artists School (UARG:92,1,0)
  196. 1168. building in which Jacob Lawrence had his first solo show in 1938
    the Harlem YMCA (UARG:92,1,0)
  197. 1169. government agency that hired Jacob Lawrence following his first solo show
    the Works Progress Administration/ Federal Arts Project (UARG:92,1,0)
  198. 1170. two historical figures Jacob Lawrence created series of paintings on in 1938
    Frederick Douglass and Harriet Tubman (UARG:92,2,0)
  199. 1171. college that hired Jacob Lawrence in 1946
    Black Mountain College (UARG:92,2,1)
  200. 1172. university that hired Jacob Lawrence in 1970
    University of Washington (UARG:92,2,1)
  201. 1173. Gwendolyn Knight
    Jacob Lawrence’s wife (UARG:92,2,1)
  202. 1174. four social incentives for African‐Americans to leave the South between the World Wars
    • discrimination, limited education, poor health care, and inadequate housing
    • (UARG:92,2,2)
  203. 1175. environmental incentive for African‐Americans to leave the South between the World Wars
    boll weevil infestations (UARG:92,2,2)
  204. 1176. three improvements African‐Americans sought by leaving the South between the World Wars
    better jobs, education, and living conditions (UARG:92,2,3)
  205. 1177. the Great Migration
    the northwards migration of 1.5 million African‐Americans between the World Wars (UARG:92,2,3)
  206. 1178. four cities to which African Americans migrated between the World Wars
    New York, Detroit, Chicago, and Saint Louis (UARG:92,2,3)
  207. 1179. number of panels in Jacob Lawrence’s Great Migration series
    60 (UARG:93,1,1)
  208. 1180. size of panels in Jacob Lawrence’s Great Migration series
    12” x 18” (UARG:93,1,1)
  209. 1181. What feature accompanies the panels in Jacob Lawrence’s Great Migration series?
    brief text that narrates the panels (UARG:93,1,1)
  210. 1182. orientation of the panel And the Migrants Kept Coming
    horizontal (UARG:93,1,2)
  211. 1183. subject of And the Migrants Kept Coming
    a group of African‐American men, women, and children (UARG:93,1,2)
  212. 1184. What feature separates the figures of And the Migrants Kept Coming from the viewer?
    railroad tracks (UARG:93,1,2)
  213. 1185. What situation does the appearance of the figures in And the Migrants Kept Coming indicate?
    travelling (UARG:93,1,2)
  214. 1186. What TWO aspects of the figures in And the Migrants Kept Coming are unusual?
    have no facial features and outlines blend together (UARG:93,1,2)
  215. 1187. What
    • objects occupy the foreground in And the Migrants Kept Coming?
    • trunks and suitcases (UARG:93,1,2)
  216. 1188. effect of the facelessness and blending together of figures in And the Migrants Kept Coming
    none of the figures seem like individuals (UARG:93,1,2)
  217. 1189. two materials used in And the Migrants Kept Coming
    tempera paint and composition board (UARG:93,1,3)
  218. 1190. How did Jacob Lawrence select his color palette for his Great Migration series?
    used inexpensive paint powders (UARG:93,1,3)
  219. 1191. two features Jacob Lawrence used to unify the panels of his Great Migration series
    color palette and repeated motifs (UARG:93,1,4)
  220. 1192. Where in the series does And the Migrants Kept Coming fit?
    at the end (UARG:93,1,4)
  221. 1193. two methods Jacob Lawrence used to create variety in his compositions
    alternating close and distant viewpoints and vertical and horizontal compositions (UARG:93,1,4)
  222. 1194. What aspect of the Great Migration do the early panels of Jacob Lawrence’s Great Migration series illustrate?
    the various causes for the migration (UARG:93,2,1)
  223. 1195. What aspect of the Great Migration do the later panels of Jacob Lawrence’s Great Migration series illustrate?
    positive and negative aspects of life in the North (UARG:93,2,1)
  224. 1196. museum that owns the even numbered panels of Jacob Lawrence’s Great Migration series
    the Museum of Modern Art (UARG:93,2,3)
  225. 1197. museum that owns the odd numbered panels of Jacob Lawrence’s Great Migration series
    the Philips Collection (UARG:93,2,3)
  226. 1198. magazine that published some panels from Jacob Lawrence’s Great Migration series in 1941
    Fortune magazine (UARG:93,2,4)
  227. 1199. museum at which the entire Great Migration series was exhibited before going on a nationwide tour
    the Museum of Modern Art (UARG:93,2,4)
  228. 1200. Edward Hopper
    a famous 20th century painter (UARG:94,1,1)
  229. 1201. How did Edward Hopper’s subjects differ from those of the Regionalists?
    painted urban scenes (UARG:94,1,1)
  230. 1202. Edward Hopper’s town of birth
    Nyack, New York (UARG:94,1,2)
  231. 1203. school at which Edward Hopper was formally educated in art
    New York Institute of Art and Design (UARG:94,1,2)
  232. 1204. three artists who taught Edward Hopper
    William Merritt Chase, Robert Henri, and John Sloan (UARG:94,1,2)
  233. 1205. Edward Hopper’s 1905 job
    advertising illustrator (UARG:94,1,3)
  234. 1206. number of trips Edward Hopper made to Europe between 1906 and 1910
    3 (UARG:94,1,3)
  235. 1207. aspect of Europe on which Edward Hopper focused during his trips
    the Paris art scene (UARG:94,1,3)
  236. 1208. two main themes of Edward Hopper’s art
    architecture and figures in shared spaces (UARG:94,1,3)
  237. 1209. emotion evoked by much of Edward Hopper’s art
    the isolation of urban living (UARG:94,1,3)
  238. 1210. Josephine Nivison
    Edward Hopper’s wife and manager (UARG:94,1,4)
  239. 1211. museum through which Edward Hopper first received critical acclaim in 1923
    the Brooklyn Museum (UARG:94,1,4)
  240. 1212. number of pieces Edward Hopper contributed to the 1923 Brooklyn Museum exhibition
    six (UARG:94,1,4)
  241. 1213. museum that held a 1933 retrospective of Edward Hopper’s work
    the Museum of Modern Art (UARG:94,1,4)
  242. 1214. How did the 1923 Brooklyn Museum exhibition change Edward Hopper’s lifestyle?
    able to support himself through paintings (UARG:94,1,4)
  243. 1215. neighborhood in which Edward Hopper lived with his wife
    Greenwich Village (UARG:94,2,0)
  244. 1216. two elements of Edward Hopper’s painting that evoke film stills
    strong lighting and frozen poses (UARG:94,2,1)
  245. 1217. two of Edward Hopper’s dominant personality traits
    silent and solitary (UARG:94,2,1)
  246. 1218. How did Thomas Hart Benton’s personality differ from that of Edward Hopper?
    outspoken (UARG:94,2,1)
  247. 1219. Nighthawks
    a famous Edward Hopper painting (UARG:94,2,2)
  248. 1220. location of the diner that formed the basis for Nighthawks
    Greenwich Village, New York City (UARG:94,2,2)
  249. 1221. What feature of New York City contrasts with the composition of Edward Hopper’s Nighthawks?
    skyscrapers (UARG:95,1,0)
  250. 1222. material of the walls of the diner in Nighthawks
    glass (UARG:95,1,1)
  251. 1223. What part of the diner is not shown in Nighthawks?
    the door (UARG:95,1,1)
  252. 1224. color of the employee’s clothes in Nighthawks
    white (UARG:95,1,2)
  253. 1225. color of the woman’s dress in Nighthawks
    red (UARG:95,1,2)
  254. 1226. color of the woman’s hair in Nighthawks
    red (UARG:95,1,2)
  255. 1227. drink the customers are consuming in Nighthawks
    coffee (UARG:95,1,2)
  256. 1228. two articles of clothing worn by the male customers in Nighthawks
    hat and suit (UARG:95,1,2)
  257. 1229. content of the text in Nighthawks
    advertising for Phillies cigars (UARG:95,1,3)
  258. 1230. two items conspicuously absent from the counter in Nighthawks
    food and menus (UARG:95,1,3)
  259. 1231. objects placed against the back wall of the diner in Nighthawks
    coffee tureens (UARG:95,1,3)
  260. 1232. color of the diner’s walls in Nighthawks
    yellow (UARG:95,1,3)
  261. 1233. shape of the diner’s counter in Nighthawks
    triangular (UARG:95,1,3)
  262. 1234. To where does the door in the diner in Nighthawks seem to lead?
    the kitchen (UARG:95,1,3)
  263. 1235. edifice across from the diner in Nighthawks
    a storefront (UARG:95,1,4)
  264. 1236. edifice above the storefront in Nighthawks
    an apartment (UARG:95,1,4)
  265. 1237. What feature of the apartment above the storefront in Nighthawks indicates the presence of inhabitants?
    open blinds (UARG:95,2,4)
  266. 1238. phrase used by Barbara Haskell to describe Edward Hopper’s work
    “narrative of inaction” (UARG:95,1,5)
  267. 1239. What question do the frozen moments depicted in Edward Hopper’s work invite?
    what the circumstances of the subjects are (UARG:95,1,5)
  268. 1240. How is the appearance of the diner in Nighthawks distinctive?
    its openness (UARG:95,1,1)
  269. 1241. Which two figures in Nighthawks have an implied relationship?
    the man and woman sitting together at the counter (UARG:95,1,5)
  270. 1242. How does Edward Hopper trace the edges of the buildings in Nighthawks?
    hard lines (UARG:95,1,1)
  271. 1243. How is a relationship implied between the man and woman sitting together at the counter in Nighthawks?
    hands are almost touching (UARG:95,1,2)
  272. 1244. What kind of light illuminates the sidewalk in Nighthawks?
    fluorescent (UARG:95,1,0)
  273. 1245. What feature is echoed by the curve of the counter in Nighthawks?
    the curve of the building (UARG:95,1,1)
  274. 1246. In what position is the solitary man at the counter sitting in Nighthawks?
    with his back to the viewer (UARG:95,1,2)
  275. 1247. What theme common to Edward Hopper’s work is represented in Nighthawks?
    the human experience of the city (UARG:95,1,0)
  276. 1248. color of the employee’s hair in Nighthawks
    blond (UARG:95,1,2)
  277. 1249. European art movement rejected by Edward Hopper
    Modernism (UARG:94,1,3)

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