assessment

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brittwhitener
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43441
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assessment
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2010-10-19 16:42:44
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assessment
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assessment
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  1. what are the disability categories
    • A. AUTISM
    • B. DEAF-BLINDNESS
    • C. HEARING IMPAIRMENT (INCLUDING DEAFNESS)
    • D. EMOTIONAL DISTURBANCE
    • E. MENTAL RETARDATION
    • F. MULTIPLE DISABILITIES
    • G. ORTHOPEDIC IMPAIRMENT
    • H. OTHER HEALTH IMPAIRMENT
    • I. SPECIFIC LEARNING DISABILITY
    • J. SPEECH OR LANGUAGE IMPAIRMENT
    • K. TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY
    • L. VISUAL IMPAIRMENT (INCLUDING
    • BLINDNESS)
  2. KTEA II:
    • Age Ranges: 4 ½ - 25 years old · Major Areas Assessed:
    • 1) Oral Language (Listening comprehension, oral expression)
    • 2) Reading (Early reading skills, work reading, pseudoword decoding, reading comprehension, oral reading)
    • 3) Written Expression (alphabet writing fluency, spelling, sentence composition, essay composite)
    • 4) Mathematics (problem solving, numerical operations)
    • 5) Math Fluency (addition, subtraction, multiplication) ·
    • Strengths:
    • Reliability is in the .80 - .90’s
    • validity is in the .70 - .80’s · Weaknesses:
    • limited ceiling for Spelling, Associational Fluency and Naming Fluency; limited floor for some subtests for younger students with lowest ability level.
  3. Bender-Gestalt
  4. Age Ranges: 4 – 85 + years old
    • Areas Assessed: copy, recall, and motor and perception tests (fine motor development, perceptual discrimination, and integration of perceptual and motor processes)
    • Strengths:
    • standardization sample (stratified random sampling of 4,000 individuals to match 2000 census),
    • Reliabiliity is in the .80 to .90’s (also high correlations between Bender vs. achievement, intelligence and other v-m), no reading required, brief
    • Weaknesses:
    • has been criticized for being used to assess problems with organic factors in the brain. This criticism stes from the lack of specific signs on the Bender Gestalt Test that are definitively associated with brain injury, mental retardation, and other physiological disorders. It is an extremely rough screening instrument, since you can have some pretty severe left hemisphere damage and not show any problems on the Bender. You can also have some types of right brain damage that do not show up as well.
  5. Name the major report areas and information contained in each section:
    • 1. Identifying information
    • 2. Reason for referral
    • 3. Assessment measures
    • 4. Background information
    • 5. Behavioral observations
    • 6. Results
    • 7. Conclusions
    • 8. Recommendations
    • 9. Diagnosis
    • 10. Signature lines
  6. Define Adaptive Behavior
    • a. Degree to which an individual is able to function and maintain him/herself independently and meet cultural expectations for personal and social responsibility at his/her developmental age.
    • b. Represents an interaction of personal, cognitive, social, and situational variables
    • c. Adaptive skills are very developmental in nature
  7. when would yo need to administer an adaptive behavior scale?
  8. A comprehensive evaluation as defined by the state special education department includes an adaptive behavior assessment
  9. Why would it be necessary to assess adaptive behavior in multiple settings? Why and how might a child’s behavior differ from one setting to the next?
  10. · To try and establish inter-rater reliability between home and school environments, one would assess adaptive behavior in multiple settings. By looking at multiple settings, one can determine commonalities and differences between the child’s behavior across settings.
    • · However, there is often poor coordination between different raters because of the different behavioral expectations placed on a child across settings.
    • · A child may never be expected to tie his shoes at home because his parents always do it for him. At school, the child may tie his/her own shoes because the teacher expects and allows him/her to tie his/her shoes.
    • · More stringent expectations at school, more individual attention at home Parents ratings tend to be higher
  11. In what ways can adaptive behavior information be used?
  12. · Diagnostic evaluations, particularly in cases of suspected mental retardation
    • · Developmental evaluations
    • · Comparison of behavior across settings
    • · Program planning
    • · Progress monitoring
    • · Research
  13. Name and describe skill areas on adaptive behavior measures used with children or adults.
  14. · Communication-measures several different areas including understanding, following instructions, listening and attending, speech skills, reading skills, writing skills, and expressing complex ideas.
    • · Daily living skills include eating and drinking, bathing, grooming, health care, housekeeping, time and dates, and money skills.
    • · Socialization includes responding to others, expressing and recognizing emotions, social communication, friendship, sharing and cooperating, transitions, controlling impulses, manners, apologizing, and responsibility.

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