this is rediculous

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LaurenFleming
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this is rediculous
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2010-12-06 09:40:07
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NURS INFORMATICS
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  1. Acuity System
    Calculates the nursing care requirements for individual patients based on severity of illness, specialized equipment and technology needed, and intensity of nursing interventions; determines the amount of daily nursing care needed for each patient in a nursing unit.
  2. Admission, Discharge and Transfer (ADT) System
    • Provides the backbone structure for the other types of clinical and business systems (Hassett & Thede, 2003); it contains the
    • groundwork for the other types of healthcare information systems since it
    • includes the patient’s name, medical record number, visit or account number and
    • demographic information such as age, sex, home address and contact information;
    • they are the central source for collecting this type of patient information and
    • communicating it to the other types of healthcare information systems including
    • clinical and business
  3. Attribute
    • - Quality or characteristic;
    • field or element of an entity in a database.
  4. Care Plan
    • A set of guidelines that
    • outline the course of treatment and the recommended interventions that will
    • achieve optimal results .
  5. Case Management Information System(CMIS)
    • An information system, or group of components that interact to produce
    • information, "designed to facilitate the practice of case management by supporting the information needs of case managers"
  6. Clinical Documentation System
    • - Array or collection of applications and functionality; amalgamation of systems, medical equipment, and technologies working together that are committed or dedicated to collecting, storing and manipulating healthcare data and information and providing secure
    • access to inter-disciplinary clinicians navigating the continuum of cient care; designed to collect
    • patient data in real time to enhance care by providing data at the clinician's
    • fingertips and enabling decision making where it needs to occur, at the
    • bedside; also known as clinical information systems (CIS).
  7. Clinical Information System (CIS)
    • - Array or collection of applications and functionality; amalgamation of systems, medical equipment, and technologies working together that are committed or dedicated to
    • collecting, storing and manipulating healthcare data and information and providing secure access to
    • inter-disciplinary clinicians navigating the continuum of cient care; designed to
    • collect patient data in real time
    • to enhance care by providing data at the clinician's fingertips and enabling
    • decision making where it needs to occur, at the bedside; also known as clinical
    • documentation systems.
  8. Collaboration
    • The sharing of ideas and experiences for the purposes of mutual understanding and
    • learning.
  9. Column
    - Field or attribute of an entity in a database.
  10. Communication System
    • Collection
    • of individual communications networks and transmission systems; in healthcare,
    • it includes call light systems, wireless phones, pagers, email, instant messaging and any
    • other devices or networks that clinicians use to communicate with patients,
    • families, other professionals, internal and external resources
  11. Computerized Physician Order Entry System
    • - A system that automates the
    • way that orders have traditionally been initiated for patients.
    • Clinicians place orders within these systems instead of traditional handwritten
    • transcription onto paper; provide major safeguards by ensuring that physician
    • orders are legible and complete thereby providing a level of patient safety
    • that was historically missing with paper-based orders. These systems
    • provide decision support and automated alert functionality that was previously
    • unavailable with paper-based orders.
  12. Core Business Systems
    • - Enhance administrative
    • tasks within healthcare organizations.
    • Unlike clinical information systems whose aim is to provide direct
    • patient care, these systems support the management of healthcare within an
    • organization. Core business systems provide the framework for reimbursement,
    • support of best practices, quality control, and resource allocation. There are
    • four common core business systems:
    • 1) admission, discharge and transfer (ADT), 2) financial, 3) acuity, and
    • 4) scheduling systems.
  13. Database
    • a collection of related records stored in a computer system using software that
    • permits a person or program to query the data in order to extract needed
    • information; consist of one or more related data files or tables; “1. A file
    • created by a database manager that contains a collection of information. The
    • basic database contains fields, records, and files: a field is a single piece
    • of information; a record is one complete set of fields; and a file is a
    • collection of records. 2. A collection of stored data typically organized into
    • fields, records, and files and associated descriptions
  14. Database Management System (DBMS
    • - database software that
    • allows the database to be accessed; “1. A program that lets one or more
    • computer users create and access data into a database. 2. “A set of programs
    • used to define, administer, store, modify, process, and extract information
    • from a database
  15. Data Dictionary
    • Contains a listing of the tables and their details including field names, validation
    • settings and data types.
  16. Data File
    • - A collection of related
    • records.
  17. Data Mart
    • Collection
    • of data focusing on a specific topic or organizational unit or department
    • created to facilitate management personnel making strategic business decisions;
    • could be as small as one database or larger such as a compilation of databases;
    • generally smaller than a data warehouse
  18. Data Mining
    • - Software that sorts through
    • data in order to discover patterns and ascertain or establish relationships;
    • software that discovers or uncovers previously unidentified relationships among
    • the data in a database; program that conducts exploratory analysis looking for
    • hidden patterns in data.
  19. Data Warehouse (DW)
    • An
    • extremely large database or repository that stores all of an organization’s or
    • institution’s data and makes this data available for data mining; combination
    • of an institution’s many different databases that provides management personnel
    • flexible access to the data.
  20. Decision Support
    • A single recommendation or
    • series of recommendations implying next steps based on care protocols; the
    • computer reminders and alerts to improve the diagnosis and care of a patient
    • including screening for correct drug selection and dosing, medication interactions
    • with other medications, preventive health reminders in areas such as
    • vaccinations, health risk screening and detection and clinical guidelines for
    • patient disease treatment (IOM, 2003).
  21. Drill-down
    • Means the user can view data warehouse information by drilling down to lower levels
    • of the database to focus on information that is pertinent to her/his needs at
    • the moment.
  22. Electronic Medical Record (EMR)
    • - A data warehouse or
    • repository of information regarding the health status of a client, replacing
    • the former paper-based medical record; it is the systematic documentation of a
    • client’s health status and healthcare in a secured digital format, meaning that
    • it can be processed, stored, transmitted and accessed by authorized
    • interdisciplinary professionals for the purpose of supporting efficient, high
    • quality healthcare across the client’s healthcare continuum; (also known as an
    • Electronic Medical Record): An electronic health or medical record is a
    • computer-based patient medical record that can be used to collect and look up
    • patient data by physicians or health professionals at various locations such as
    • doctor’s offices or hospitals. The record includes information such as
    • patient problems, medications, allergies, laboratory results, etc.
  23. Entity
    • - Represents a table and each
    • field within the table becomes an attribute of that entity. The database
    • developer must critically think about the attributes for each specific entity.
    • For example, the entity disease might have the attributes of “chronic disease”,
    • “acute disease”, or “communicable disease”. The name of the entity “disease”,
    • would imply that the entity is about diseases. The fields or attributes would
    • be chronic, acute or communicable.
  24. Entity Relationship Diagram (ERD
    • - Specifies the relationship
    • among the entities in the database. Sometimes the implied relationships are
    • apparent based on the entities’ definitions however all relationships should be
    • specified as to how they relate to one another. There are typically three relationships, one to one, one to
    • many and many to many. An example of a one to one relationship would exist
    • between the entities of the table about Patient and the table about the Patient’s
    • Birth. The one to many relationship could exist when one entity is repeatedly
    • used by another entity. The one to many could then be a table query for age
    • that could be used numerous time for one patient entity. The many to many would
    • reflect entities that are both used repeatedly by other entities. This is
    • easily explained by the entities of Patient and Nurse. The patient could have
    • several nurses caring for her/him and the nurse could have many patients
    • assigned to her/him.
  25. Field
    • - Column or attribute of an
    • entity in a database.
  26. Financial System
    • - Manage the expenses and
    • revenue for providing healthcare. The finance, auditing, and accounting
    • departments within an organization most commonly use financial systems.
    • These systems determine the direction for maintenance and growth for a given
    • facility. Financial systems often interface to share information with
    • materials management, staffing, and billing systems to balance the financial
    • impact of these resources within an organization. These systems report
    • the fiscal outcomes in order to track them against the organizational goals of
    • an institution. Financial systems are one of the major decision-making
    • factors as healthcare institutions prepare their fiscal budgets. These
    • systems often play a pivotal role in determining the strategic direction for an
    • organization.
  27. Information System (IS)
    • A group
    • of components that interact to produce information; the manual and/or automated
    • components of a system of users or people, recorded data and actions used to
    • process the data into information for a user, group of users or an
    • organization.
  28. Information Technology (IT
    • Use of hardware, software, services, and supporting infrastructure to manage and
    • deliver information using voice, data, and video or the use of technologies
    • from computing, electronics, and telecommunications to process and distribute
    • information in digital and other forms; anything related to computing
    • technology, such as networking, hardware, software, the Internet, or the people
    • that work with these technologies. Many hospitals have IT departments for
    • managing the computers, networks, and other technical areas of the healthcare
    • industry.
  29. Key Field
    • Within
    • each record, one of the fields is identified as the primary key or key field.
    • This primary key contains a code, name, number, or other bit of information
    • acts as a unique identifier for that record. In your healthcare system, for
    • example, your patient is assigned a patient number or ID that is unique for
    • that patient. As you compile related records, you create data files or tables.
    • A data file is a collection of related records.
  30. Knowledge Exchange
    • - The product of
    • collaboration when sharing an understanding of information promotes learning to
    • make better decisions in the future.
  31. Laboratory Information System
    • Report on blood, body fluid and tissue samples along with biological specimens that
    • are collected at the bedside and received in a central laboratory. These
    • systems provide clinicians with reference ranges for tests indicating high, low
    • or normal values in order to make care decisions. Often the laboratory system
    • provides result information directing clinicians towards the next course of
    • action within a treatment regime.
  32. Order Entry System
    • A system that automates the
    • way that orders have traditionally been initiated for patients.
    • Clinicians place orders within these systems instead of traditional handwritten
    • transcription onto paper; provide major safeguards by ensuring that physician
    • orders are legible and complete thereby providing a level of patient safety
    • that was historically missing with paper-based orders. These systems
    • provide decision support and automated alert functionality that was previously
    • unavailable with paper-based orders.
  33. Patient Care Information System (PCIS
    • - Patient-centered
    • information systems focused on collecting data and disseminating information
    • related to direct care. Several of these systems have become mainstream
    • types of systems used in healthcare. The four systems most commonly found
    • include 1) clinical documentation systems, 2) pharmacy information systems, 3)
    • laboratory information systems and 4) radiology information systems.
  34. Patient Care Support System
    • System
    • of components that make up each of the specialty disciplines within healthcare
    • and their associated patient care information systems. The four systems most
    • commonly found include 1) clinical documentation systems, 2) pharmacy
    • information systems, 3) laboratory information systems and 4) radiology
    • information systems
  35. Patient-Centered
    • Change from a focus on
    • illness/healthcare professional to a focus on the patient/person with patients
    • becoming active participants in their own healthcare initiatives; patients as
    • active participants receive services designed to meet their individual needs
    • and preferences, under the guidance and counsel of their healthcare
    • professionals; data, observations, interventions and outcomes focused on direct
    • patient care.
  36. Pharmacy Information System
    • Information
    • systems that facilitate the ordering, managing and dispensing of medications
    • for a facility. They also commonly incorporate allergies and height and
    • weight information for effective medication management; streamline the order
    • entry, dispensing, verification and authorization process for medication
    • administration while they often interface with clinical documentation and order
    • entry systems so that clinicians can order and document the administration of
    • medications and prescriptions to patients while having the benefits of decision
    • support alerting and interaction checking
  37. Picture and Archiving Communication System (PACS)
    • Systems
    • that are designed to collect, store and distribute medical images such as
    • computed tomography (CT) scans, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and X-rays;
    • replace traditional hard copy films with digital media that is easy to store,
    • retrieve and present to clinicians. These systems may also be stand-alone
    • systems, separate from the main radiology system, or they can be integrated
    • with radiology information systems (RIS) and computer information systems
    • (CIS). The benefit of RIS and PACS systems is their ability to assist in
    • diagnosing and storing vital patient care support data.
  38. Primary Key
    • - Within each record, one of
    • the fields is identified as the primary key or key field. This primary key
    • contains a code, name, number, or other bit of information acts as a unique
    • identifier for that record. In your healthcare system, for example, your patient
    • is assigned a patient number or ID that is unique for that patient. As you
    • compile related records, you create data files or tables. A data file is a
    • collection of related records
  39. Radiology Information System (RIS
    • - information systems
    • designed to schedule, result, and store information as it relates to diagnostic
    • radiology procedures. One common feature found in most radiology systems
    • is a Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACS). These systems may
    • also be stand-alone systems, separate from the main radiology system, or they
    • can be integrated with RIS and computer information systems (CIS). These
    • systems collect, store and distribute medical images such as computed
    • tomography (CT) scans, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and X-rays. PACS
    • replace traditional hard copy films with digital media that is easy to store,
    • retrieve and present to clinicians. The benefit of RIS and PACS systems is
    • their ability to assist in diagnosing and storing vital patient care support
    • data
  40. Relational Database Management System (RDBMS
    • -
    • Is a system that manages
    • data using the relational model. A relational database could link a Patient’s table to a
    • Treatment table for example by a common field such as the Patient ID number. In
    • order to keep track of the tables that comprise a database, the database management systems
    • (DBMS) uses software called a data dictionary.
  41. Repository
    • - Central place where data
    • are collected, stored and maintained; central location for multiple databases
    • or files that can be distributed over a network or directly accessible to the
    • user; location for files and databases so the data that can be reused, analyzed,
    • explored or repurposed.
  42. Stakeholder
    • - An individual or group with
    • the responsibility for completing a project, influencing the overall design,
    • and is most impacted by success or failure of the system implementation.
  43. Cognitive Task Analysis (CTA)
    • Examination
    • of the nature of a task by breaking it down into its component parts and
    • identifying the performers’ thought processes.
  44. Cognitive Walkthrough
    • -A technique used to
    • evaluate a computer interface or a software program by breaking down and
    • explaining the steps that a user will take to accomplish a task.
  45. Cognitive Work Analysis (CWA)
    • -
    • A multi-faceted analytic procedure developed specifically for the analysis of
    • complex, high technology work domains.
  46. Ergonomics
    • -
    • In the United States, this term is used to describe the physical
    • characteristics of equipment, for example, the optimal fit of a scissors to a
    • human hand. In Europe, the term is synonymous with Human Factors. It is
    • the interaction of humans with physical attributes of equipment or the
    • interaction of humans and the arrangement of equipment in the work
    • environment .
  47. Gulf of Evaluation
    • The
    • gap between knowing your intention (goal) and knowing the effects of your
    • actions.
  48. Gulf of Execution
    • The
    • gap between knowing what you want to have happen (the goal) and knowing what to
    • do to bring it about (the means to achieve the goal).
  49. Heuristic Evaluation
    • -
    • An evaluation in which a small number of evaluators (often experts in relevant
    • fields such as human factors or cognitive engineering) evaluate the degree to
    • which the interface design complies with recognized usability principles (the
    • “heuristics”).
  50. Human-Computer Interaction (HCI)
    • -
    • The processes, dialogues and actions that a user employs to interact with a
    • computer; also the study of interaction between people (users) and computers (Wikipedia, 8/1/07); deals with
    • people, software applications, computer technology and the ways they influence
    • each other.
  51. Human-Computer Interface
    • The
    • hardware and software through which the user interacts with the computer.
  52. Human-Technology Interaction (HTI
    • -
    • How users interact with technology; also the study of that interaction.
  53. Human-Technology Interface
    • The
    • hardware and software through which the user interacts with any technology
    • (e.g., computers, patient monitors, telephone, etc.).
  54. Task analysis
    • Analytic
    • technique that focuses on how a task must be accomplished, including detailed
    • descriptions of task-related activities, task characteristics and complexity,
    • and the environmental conditions required for a person to perform a given task.
  55. Query and
    Surveillance Systems
    • —Used to analyze
    • patient outcomes, practice patterns, and emergence of new diseases or health
    • threats

    • —No manual/paper
    • counterpart

    • —Output – alert or
    • clinical reminder

    ¡Clinical care

    ¡Clinical research

    ¡Retrospective studies

    ¡Administrative uses
  56. Data Capture-
    • - Acquire
    • or capture data from sources for the purpose of transmitting such data, as in telehealth. Some telehealth devices capture both objective data and through
    • the use of interactive self reporting devices also capture subjective
    • information on how a patient “feels”.
  57. Peripheral Devices
    • Devices
    • used in home telehealth can include any item with
    • a digital readout. Generally
    • this equipment is “self administrated” by the patient or family caregiver. Examples of the most commonly used
    • peripheral devices include: Weight Scale, Blood Pressure Monitor, Pulse Oximeter, Thermometer, Glucometer, Spirometer, Prothrombin Meters(PT/INR), Digital Camera (to
    • capture images of wounds), PDA based or telephonic self reporting devices.
    • Specialty equipment used in managing cardiac, respiratory, transplant and
    • bariatric patients are commonly used as well. While live video has long been available, use of interactive
    • visual technology is limited in field applications because of the need to have
    • a dedicated clinician “sitting” on the receiving end. The cost and scheduling complexity associated with the use
    • of live video has limited it application.
  58. Telehealth
    • - Using telecommunication
    • technologies to deliver health related services or to connect patients and
    • healthcare providers to maximize patient's health status; a relatively new term
    • in our medical /nursing vocabulary; referring to and a wide range of health
    • services that are delivered by telecommunications-ready tools, such as the
    • telephone, videophone, and computer.
    • The most basic of telecommunications technology, the telephone, has been
    • used by health professionals for many years, sometimes by nurses to counsel a
    • patient or by doctors to change a patient’s plan of care. Because of these
    • widespread uses, we are already somewhat familiar with the value of the direct,
    • expedient contact that telecommunications-ready tools provide for healthcare
    • professionals. The growing field of telehealth, particularly in nursing
    • practice, will allow us to improve care delivery services even more.
  59. Telehealth Hardware
    • Equipment
    • that captures objective vital sign data. Some systems use interactive
    • self-reporting devices to capture subjective information on how a patient feels
    • as well. The values obtained from the patient are then collected and
    • transmitted by a communication hub. Peripheral devices used in home telehealth can include any item
    • with a digital readout. Generally this equipment is self-administrated by the
    • patient or family caregiver.
  60. PICO
    Format
    ¨Patient, population, or problem

    ¨Intervention

    ¨Comparison

    ¨Outcome
  61. : Archetype
    • a computable expression of a domain content model based on a reference
    • model
  62. Enumerative
    • the approach where words or phrases are represented in a
    • list or simple hierarchy
  63. Ontological
    ICNP takes this approach
  64. CCC
    • This abbreviation for a system consists of 2 interrelated
    • terminologies
  65. NIC
    • This acronym describes the terminology that covers
    • interventions performed by nurses
  66. NOC
    • This acronym describes the terminology that covers
    • patient/client outcomes
  67. OmahaSystem
    • This system provides both a terminology and a framework for
    • documentation
  68. PNDS
    covers specifically the perioperaptive patient experience

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