environmentalquiz.txt

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Anonymous
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61570
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environmentalquiz.txt
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2011-01-24 00:00:42
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Environs Quiz
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  1. You are called to football training camp in late August. The football player you are treating has been exercising in the sun and sweating profusely. He has been drinking water at regular intervals throughout the day. His skin is hot and sweaty, and he is alert and normotensive. This patient is likely to complain of:
    Muscle cramps
  2. The most efficient in-hospital technique to warm a hypothermic body is:
    Cardiopulmonary bypass
  3. Rebound hypothermia can be avoided by:
    Cooling the patient to a core body temperature of 102� F
  4. You are called to football training camp in late August. The football player you are treating has been exercising in the sun and sweating profusely. He has been drinking water at regular intervals throughout the day. His skin is hot and sweaty, and he is alert and normotensive. Treatment for this patient includes:
    Replacement of depleted sodium
  5. A process resulting in primary respiratory impairment from submersion/immersion in a liquid medium is defined as:
    Drowning
  6. Which factors most influence survival after drowning?
    • Duration of submersion
    • Temperature of the water
    • Age of the patient
    • Cleanliness of the water
  7. You are called to a snow-covered cabin. The ambient temperature has been 10� F for more than 1 week. A hiker tells you that he believes a man has been in the cabin for 2 days without heat, food, or water. When you examine the patient he is bradycardic and Osborn waves are visible on the ECG. He is not shivering and has a depressed level of consciousness. You would expect this patient�s core body temperature to be:
    86� F
  8. One of the most common afflictions of scuba divers when tissue damage from compression or expansion of gas spaces occurs is called:
    Barotrauma
  9. An illness that results from rapid ascent in a high altitude by unacclimatized persons, characterized by headache, vomiting and dizziness is:
    Acute mountain sickness
  10. Preventive measures that can be taken to reduce the risk for external heat illness for all age groups include:
    Avoiding or limiting exercise in hot environments
  11. The most important body organ(s) for regulating heat loss is (are) the:
    Skin
  12. The mammalian diving reflex occurs when:
    Blood is shunted to the brain stimulated by cold water
  13. ECG changes expected for a severely hypothermic patient include:
    Visible Osborn wave
  14. Heat loss by air flowing around your body on a windy day is called:
    Convection
  15. You are called to the home of a 50-year-old patient who has been working on his roof for the last 3 hours. Your patient is lying out in the middle of his yard. Examination reveals that the patient has a temperature of 105� F and is confused, flushed, and tachycardic. Your initial management therapies of this patient should include:
    Moving the patient to a cool environment, keeping the skin wet and fan him, and administer IV fluids
  16. Exertional heat stroke occurs when:
    Young healthy persons exercise in hot humid conditions
  17. You are called to a snow-covered cabin. The ambient temperature has been 10� F for more than 1 week. A hiker tells you that he believes a man has been in the cabin for 2 days without heat, food, or water. When you examine the patient he is bradycardic and Osborn waves are visible on the ECG. He is not shivering and has a depressed level of consciousness. This patient is displaying signs and symptoms of:
    Moderate hypothermia
  18. When the hypothalamus receives a stimulus that the core body temperature is increasing it compensates by:
    Respiratory rate increases, cardiac output increases, and sweat gland activity speeds up
  19. A complication of pulmonary barotrauma and a major cause of death among sport divers is:
    Air embolism
  20. The tissues that produce the most heat in humans are:
    Skeletal muscles
  21. Initially, exposure to cold results in:
    Increased blood pressure
  22. Expansion of trapped air in the lungs from reverse squeeze can result in:
    Pulmonary overpressurization syndrome
  23. Shivering generally stops when:
    Insulin is no longer available for glucose transfer
  24. Sympathetic discharge of epinephrine and norepinephrine can lead to heat regulation by causing:
    Peripheral vasoconstriction
  25. A cold injury that occurs from immersion of extremities in water above 32� F is called:
    Trenchfoot
  26. An illness that results from rapid ascent in a high altitude by unacclimatized persons, characterized by headache, vomiting and dizziness is:
    Acute mountain sickness
  27. You are called to a snow-covered cabin. The ambient temperature has been 10� F for more than 1 week. A hiker tells you that he believes a man has been in the cabin for 2 days without heat, food, or water. When you examine the patient he is bradycardic and Osborn waves are visible on the ECG. He is not shivering and has a depressed level of consciousness. Treatment for this patient includes:
    Apply chemical heat packs
  28. The body's thermoregulatory center is found in the posterior:
    Hypothalamus
  29. You are treating a patient with a markedly increased core body temperature who is unresponsive. If this patient has heat stroke:
    A small population of patients will continue to sweat
  30. A complication of pulmonary barotrauma and a major cause of death among sport divers is:
    Air embolism
  31. Medical direction may prescribe a pharmacological agent for sedation and seizure control in a heat stroke patient such as:
    Diazepam
  32. The most important body organ for regulating heat loss is the:
    Skin
  33. You are called to the home of a 50-year-old patient who has been working on his roof for the last 3 hours. Your patient is lying out in the middle of his yard. Examination reveals that the patient has a temperature of 105� F and is confused, flushed, and tachycardic. Your initial management therapies of this patient should include:
    Moving the patient to a cool environment, keeping the skin wet and fan him, and administer IV fluids
  34. The most effective therapeutic measure for preserving viable tissue after a deep frostbite injury is:
    Rapid rewarming of the frozen part by immersion in water heated no higher than 104� F
  35. Cold injury to the extremities that presents with throbbing pain, tingling, blisters, and skin that blackens into a hard eschar after rewarming is:
    Superficial frostbite
  36. Medications that contribute to classic heat stroke by impairing the body's ability to tolerate heat stress include:
    Diuretics
  37. Peripheral thermoreceptors are located in the:
    Skin
  38. Muscles fatigued by heavy exercise that are depleted of water and sodium predispose the patient to:
    Heat cramps
  39. You are called to a snow-covered cabin. The ambient temperature has been 10� F for more than 1 week. A hiker tells you that he believes a man has been in the cabin for 2 days without heat, food, or water. When you examine the patient he is bradycardic and Osborn waves are visible on the ECG. He is not shivering and has a depressed level of consciousness.
  40. Two factors that contribute significantly to the successful outcome of a patient experiencing heat stroke are:
    Rapid recognition of the heat illness and rapid cooling of the patient
  41. Shivering generally stops when:
    Insulin is no longer available for glucose transfer
  42. You are called to football training camp in late August. The football player you are treating has been exercising in the sun and sweating profusely. He has been drinking water at regular intervals throughout the day. His skin is hot and sweaty, and he is alert and normotensive.
  43. Initially, exposure to cold results in:
    Increased blood pressure
  44. You are called to football training camp in late August. The football player you are treating has been exercising in the sun and sweating profusely. He has been drinking water at regular intervals throughout the day. His skin is hot and sweaty, and he is alert and normotensive. If this player had continued to exercise without treatment and he developed dizziness and changes in mental status with mild to moderate core body temperature elevation, this syndrome would be called heat:
    Exhaustion
  45. The most efficient in-hospital technique to warm a hypothermic body is:
    Cardiopulmonary bypass
  46. Production of heat by the body is known as:
    Thermogenesis
  47. Classic heat stroke occurs when:
    There are sustained high ambient temperatures and sustained high ambient humidity
  48. You are called to football training camp in late August. The football player you are treating has been exercising in the sun and sweating profusely. He has been drinking water at regular intervals throughout the day. His skin is hot and sweaty, and he is alert and normotensive. You would expect this patient�s core body temperature to be:
    Normal
  49. The most severe form of high-altitude illness that presents with signs and symptoms of increased intracranial pressures is:
    High-altitude cerebral edema
  50. The most efficient in-hospital technique to warm a hypothermic body is:
    Cardiopulmonary bypass
  51. You are called to football training camp in late August. The football player you are treating has been exercising in the sun and sweating profusely. He has been drinking water at regular intervals throughout the day. His skin is hot and sweaty, and he is alert and normotensive. If his thermoregulatory mechanisms had totally broken down and his body temperature became elevated to levels of 41� C or higher, this syndrome would be called heat:
    Stroke
  52. You are called to a snow-covered cabin. The ambient temperature has been 10� F for more than 1 week. A hiker tells you that he believes a man has been in the cabin for 2 days without heat, food, or water. When you examine the patient he is bradycardic and Osborn waves are visible on the ECG. He is not shivering and has a depressed level of consciousness. This patient�s response to hypothermia might be impaired if he is taking medications such as:
    Antidepressives
  53. Medications that contribute to classic heat stroke by impairing the body's ability to tolerate heat stress include:
    Diuretics
  54. The syndrome that results when nitrogen in compressed air converts back from solution to gas is:
    Decompression sickness
  55. If a hypothermic patient in cardiac arrest does not respond to 1 defibrillation , you should:
    Defer further defibrillation attempts
  56. Expansion of trapped air in the lungs from reverse squeeze can result in:
    Pulmonary overpressurization syndrome
  57. Increased core body temperatures can result in cerebral:
    Acidosis
  58. The tissues that produce the most heat in humans are:
    Skeletal muscles
  59. The body's best defense against cold is:
    Shivering
  60. One of the most common afflictions of scuba divers when tissue damage from compression or expansion of gas spaces occurs is called:
    Barotrauma
  61. Heat loss by air flowing around your body on a windy day is called:
    Convection
  62. The most significant finding the paramedic has available to differentiate increased body temperature from illness and from heat stroke is:
    The ambient temperature around him
  63. Medical direction may prescribe a pharmacological agent for sedation and seizure control in a heat stroke patient such as:
    Diazepam
  64. You are called to football training camp in late August. The football player you are treating has been exercising in the sun and sweating profusely. He has been drinking water at regular intervals throughout the day. His skin is hot and sweaty, and he is alert and normotensive.
  65. Rapid rewarming of a severely hypothermic patient by immersion into hot water may result in hypotension from peripheral vasodilation. This is known as:
    Afterdrop phenomenon
  66. Your 18-year-old patient was rescued after struggling under water in a swimming pool. Which of the following findings would indicate that it is critical that she be transported for evaluation at a hospital?
    She vomited large amounts of emesis several times after rescue
  67. If a hypothermic patient in cardiac arrest does not respond to 1 defibrillation , you should:
    Defer further defibrillation attempts
  68. The body's thermoregulatory center is found in the posterior:
    Hypothalamus
  69. Production of heat by the body is known as:
    Thermogenesis
  70. A cold injury that occurs from immersion of extremities in water above 32� F is called:
    Trenchfoot
  71. Sympathetic discharge of epinephrine and norepinephrine can lead to heat regulation by causing:
    Peripheral vasoconstriction
  72. Expansion of trapped air in the lungs from reverse squeeze can result in:
    Pulmonary overpressurization syndrome
  73. Exertional heat stroke occurs when:
    Young healthy persons exercise in hot humid conditions
  74. A process resulting in primary respiratory impairment from submersion/immersion in a liquid medium is defined as:
    Drowning
  75. Two factors that contribute significantly to the successful outcome of a patient experiencing heat stroke are:
    Rapid recognition of the heat illness and rapid cooling of the patient
  76. The most severe form of high-altitude illness that presents with signs and symptoms of increased intracranial pressures is:
    High-altitude cerebral edema

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