Attitudes-Test 1

Card Set Information

Author:
skeetyr
ID:
63497
Filename:
Attitudes-Test 1
Updated:
2011-02-10 15:22:13
Tags:
attitudes test
Folders:

Description:
Attitudes test 1
Show Answers:

Home > Flashcards > Print Preview

The flashcards below were created by user skeetyr on FreezingBlue Flashcards. What would you like to do?


  1. 1-1: Persuasion is unequivocal and overt, not implied or unspoken
    False
  2. 1-2: The study of persuasion is relatively new. Nothing had been written about persuasion before the last few decades.
    False
  3. 1-3: Most people-oriented professions deal with persuasion
    True
  4. 1-4: Younger audiences are more influenced by face-to-face interactions than through mainstream media
    True
  5. 1-5: “Influentials” are the carriers of viral messages.
    False
  6. 1-6: Successful viral messages are not usually planed
    True
  7. 1-7: The more common viral message campaigns become, the less effective they will
    be.
    True
  8. 1-8: While the public is often
    guided by persuasive messages, science demands only objective examinations, and
    therefore does not deal with persuasion



    False
  9. 1-9: A study contends that the more a person consumes caffeine, the harder he or she is to persuade.
    False
  10. 1-10: True or false? Persuasion is more conspicuous in interpersonal communication than in mass media forms.
    False
  11. 1-11: Most people tend to think they are good at resisting advertising, but others are not as good.
    True
  12. 1-12: Research that goes against common sense has the most empirical interest.
    True
  13. 1-13: The authors feel persuasion is either moral or immoral, it is certainly not amoral.
    False
  14. 1-14: Determining the ethics of persuasion is less about the “what” and more about the “why.”
    True
  15. 1-15: Research is inconclusive; there are almost no generalizations regarding persuasion that
    can be relied on.
    False
  16. 2-16: The type of clothes you wear while interviewing for a job is an example of a
    “paradigm case” of persuasion.
    False
  17. 2-17: A modern interpretation of persuasion includes the context of the communication
    event, not just verbal and nonverbal communication.
    True
  18. 2-18: According to Gass and Sieter (2000, 2004), social influence is a related term that is distinguished from persuasion in that it includes non-intentional persuasive effects.
    True
  19. 2-19: Socialization is a form of persuasion that includes only the intentional social behaviors
    that teach children how to act.
    False
  20. 2-20: Defining persuasion strictly intentional attempts to change others’ attitudes and behaviors may relieve communicators of the responsibility they have toward effects on the unintended receivers of their words and actions.
    True
  21. 2-21: The effects criterion focuses on the process of persuasion, not whether it succeeds or fails.
    False
  22. 2-22: The effects criterion appreciates that persuasion is simultaneous and transactional, not simply a “sender to receiver” act.
    False
  23. 2-23: Perloff feels that persuasion only includes behavioral and attitudes changes that are freely chosen.
    True
  24. 2-24: The authors feel that persuasion does not require mindful awareness at attempts to influence.
    True
  25. 2-25: Coercive persuasion is defined as negative and unethical use of force to persuade.
    True
  26. 2-26: The authors agree with those who feel persuasion requires at least two people.
    False
  27. 2-27: The context of the persuasive process is simply the number of communicators present
    and the verbal-to-nonverbal ratio. Issues of timing, media choice, and the physical environment are outside the context of the persuasive process.
    False
  28. 2-28: The instrumental goals of persuasion refer to attempts to gain compliance.
    True
  29. 2-29: All communication is persuasive; the principal issue is the degree of persuasion,
    not whether it did or did not occur.
    True
  30. 2-30: The authors do not believe torture is a form of persuasion.
    True
  31. 2-31: The Elaboration Likelihood Model (ELM) considers all the following questions regarding the receiver(s) except one. Which is it?
    A. Does the audience find message/issue so relevant they want to process the message actively?
    B. Can they process the information presented? The audience’s level of intelligence must be considered
    C. Is the message clear? Can the audience
    D. Does the receiver respond to social proofs?
    concentrate and limit distractions?
    D.
    (this multiple choice question has been scrambled)
  32. 2-32: ELM predicts that compared to central processing, peripheral processing leads to
    longer lasting cognitive changes
    False
  33. 2-33: A student who decides not to take a chemistry course because of a fixed belief that “research courses are hard” is relying on heuristic processing.
    True
  34. 2-34: Heuristic and systematic processing routes are mutually exclusive.
    False
  35. 2-35: The unimodel of persuasion posits that central and peripheral processing are essentially the same construct; they just refer to ends of a continuum.
    True
  36. 3-36: Attitudes are inherent beliefs and sets of responses rather than acquired through
    socialization.
    False
  37. 3-37: The predisposition to respond is the most central feature of attitudes
    False
  38. 3-38: Attitudes are directly measured with the use of scales.
    False
  39. 3-39: The Semantic Differential type of item design uses pairs of opposite adjectives
    True
  40. 3-40: Social Desirability Bias refers to the tendency to give the socially expected answer to survey items
    True
  41. 3-41: The tendency to agree with survey statements, particularly face-to-face, is the problem of “non-attitudes.”
    False
  42. 3-42: “Attitude Behavior Consistency” is stronger when the complex mix of attitudes is measured, rather than any single, specific attitude.
    False
  43. 3-43: Low self-monitors typically display greater attitude-behavior consistency.
    True
  44. 3-44: Segmentation analysis refers to the marketing technique of designing a single campaign to
    appeal to a large group of diverse consumers.
    True
  45. 3-45: The fact that liars exhibit the same nonverbal behaviors as those accused of lying (when they are not) is an example of a bi-directional attitude indicator.
    True
  46. 3-46: One’s beliefs about an
    outcome can directly cause the overt act, according to TRA.
    False
  47. 3-47: The subjective norm component of TRA is comprised of social pressure regarding the overt act, and how disposed we are to comply with the social pressure.
    True
  48. 3-48: TpB differs from TRA in that TpB does not consider the receiver’s confidence in performing the act.
    False
  49. 3-49: An advertisement that shows an attractive and cool Apple Computer user next to not-so-cool IBM compatible computer user is using image-oriented advertising.
    True
  50. 3-50: People like to be consistent, and research has found the drive for consistency is about the same for all.
    False
  51. 3-51: When faced with incompatible attitudes, the greater the centrality of the attitudes involved, the less the psychological discomfort.
    False
  52. 3-52: You really dislike it when people litter. After eating an apple, you look around and don’t see a wastebasket. You throw it in the bushes and tell yourself that it isn’t littering because it’s a natural product. Which form of resolving consistency did you use:
    A. denial
    B. differentiation
    C. transcendence
    D. modifying the attitude
    A. Denial
    (this multiple choice question has been scrambled)
  53. 3-53: Persuasion is more about shifting the attitudes of receivers than modifying your message to fit the receivers’ attitudes and beliefs.
    False
  54. 3-54: Post-Decision Theory is a means of reducing cognitive dissonance.
    False
  55. 3-55: Once we make a decision, we tend to convince ourselves we really dislike the alternatives. Even if the alternatives seemed pretty close before, we now see them more negatively. This means of reducing dissonance is called “buyer’s
    remorse.”
    False
  56. 3-56: The greater the freedom we
    had in making the choice between alternatives, the greater the dissonance
    produced.
    True
  57. 3-57: If the negative outcome of a freely chosen alternative was unforeseeable, the
    dissonance is less.
    True
  58. 3-58: If your friend asked you to store her boxes of belongings in your garage for a week, but ordered you not to look in the boxes, chances are, you will.
    This is a result of psychological reactance, our natural resistance to restrictions others make on our free choice.
    True
  59. 3-59: In another course I teach, I have students participate in a debate, but they often
    are on the opposite side of their true feelings. According to CAA, this makes their preexisting attitudes even stronger; they are less likely to see the
    others’ side.
    False
  60. 3-60: Once someone states an intention to act, they are more likely to follow through with
    the act.
    True
  61. 4-61: The use of celebrity endorsers rarely works.
    False
  62. 4-62: When an advertiser uses a celebrity endorser, it is trying to reflect the desirable persona of the endorser on the brand first, and then on to the consumer.
    True
  63. 4-63: Credibility is a measure of how truthful a person is in reality, not how truthful others
    think the person is.
    False
  64. 4-64: Credibility is independent of the context of the situation. A person either is or is not
    credible.
    False
  65. 4-65: The credibility of any particular person can change over time; it is not a stable
    trait.
    True
  66. 4-66: The primary dimensions of credibility include expertise, trustworthiness, goodwill,
    and sociability.
    False
  67. 4-67: In order to help persuasion, one’s perceived expertise must always be relevant to the
    topic.
    False
  68. 4-68: Goodwill is important to perceived credibility. A persuader who lacks goodwill holds ill-will toward the receiver(s).
    False
  69. 4-69: ELM asserts that credibility is a central route characteristic.
    True
  70. 4-70: According to ELM, credibility is most important when receivers are very motivated by the
    topic and see it as very relevant.
    False
  71. 4-71: To be most effective, the receiver requires information concerning credibility at the start of a persuasive message rather than later.
    True
  72. 4-72: The
    sleeper effect is means that a message from a low-credibility source can increase in persuasiveness over time.
    True
  73. 4-73: When disassociation occurs, the receiver remembers the discounting cue, but forgets
    the message.
    False
  74. 4-74: The absolute sleeper effect refers to the tendency of persuasive messages from high-credibility speakers to become weaker over time.
    False
  75. 4-75: Yielding to social pressure to seem “politically correct” is not a form of impression management.
    False
  76. 4-76: Facework is impression management, so it is a form of persuasion.
    True
  77. 5-77: "Communicator characteristics” refer to the traits of the speaker, not the others in the persuasive encounter.
    False
  78. 5-78: Children are better than older people at resisting persuasive techniques.
    False
  79. 5-79: The elderly are better are resisting
    persuasive techniques than younger people.
    True
  80. 5-80: Males are inherently better at persuasion.
    False
  81. 5-81: Female doctors are less likely to be successful at using negative messages to get patients to comply.
    True
  82. 5-82: The cross-sex effect is the tendency to be more vulnerable to members of the same
    sex compared to members of the opposite sex.
    False
  83. 5-83: Once a person complies with a persuasive request, collectivist cultures are more likely to consistent with future similar requests.
    False
  84. 5-84: Collectivist cultures like the one in China prefer indirect persuasive strategies.
    True
  85. 5-85: Current research supports the idea that moderately intelligent people are easier to persuade compared to very intelligent or not very intelligent people.
    False
  86. 5-86: A “state” is a relatively stable characteristic. A “trait” can vary across situations.
    False
  87. 5-87: Those with low self-esteem are not as easy to persuade as people with high self-esteem.
    True
  88. 5-88: Low self-monitors are affected more by reference groups compared to high
    self-monitors.
    False
  89. 5-89: You would be more successful communicating concrete advantages of a product to a low self-monitor. High self-monitors respond more to the “image” of the
    product.
    True
  90. 5-90:To design your persuasive argument about seeking a graduate degree, you begin by comparing your message with the existing attitudes and beliefs of the audience. You determine how far you think you can move them based on how ego-involved they are. You are careful not to create too great a contrast between your message and their present attitude. This design
    is based on:
    A. Social Judgment Theory
    B. Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs
    C. Elaboration Likelihood Model
    D. Expectancy-Outcome Values Theory
    A. Social Judgement Theory
    (this multiple choice question has been scrambled)
  91. 5-91: The less a person is ego-involved in a topic, the easier it will be to get them to shift positions, according to Social Judgment Theory.
    True
  92. 5-92: Outcome-relevant involvement has to do with the persistent values of a person’s self-concept
    False
  93. 5-93: Authoritarian people resist
    authority and often deviate from expected norms of behavio
    False
  94. 5-94: According to research, authoritarian people are easier to persuade. The authors suggest this may be related to the situation and the type of persuasive
    message.
    True
  95. 5-95: Cognitively simple people are better persuaders.
    False
  96. 5-96: People low in the need for cognition are more affected by peripheral cues, like attractiveness, celebrity endorsements, and other weak forms of evidence.
    True
  97. 5-97: Argumentativeness is a destructive form of aggressive communication.
    False
  98. 5-98: A good persuader moves the receiver to the message.
    False
  99. 5-99: The new communication technologies have made it possible to identify micro-markets.
    This makes marketing more difficult than before.
    True
  100. 5-100: The authors claim that there are no “universal” needs with regard to people.
    False

What would you like to do?

Home > Flashcards > Print Preview