EngI 1-3

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Author:
bye975
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64796
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EngI 1-3
Updated:
2011-02-08 16:57:29
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AOP English Structure Language Quiz3
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The Structure of Language, Quiz 3
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  1. What determines the case of a pronoun?
    The case of a pronoun is determined by how it is used in the sentence.
  2. Pronoun - Objective Case
    Objective: The girl hopes that someone will give her a dollar for the juice machine. The objective form of the pronoun is used because the pronoun her is an indirect object.
  3. Pronoun - Nominative Case
    Nominative: The man I was just talking about is he. The nominative case is used because he is used as a subject complement.Does Nellie believe she will win the talent contest? She is the subject of the verb will win; the nominative case is used.
  4. Pronoun - Possesive Case
    Possessive: Jason is down the street trying to teach his dog to sing. The possessive form of the pronoun his is used to show ownership
  5. Pronouns used as the subject or subject complements are in which case?

    Nominative
    Possesive
    Objective
    Nominative
  6. Pronoun - Nominative Case Defined
    Pronouns used as subjects and subject complements (with linking verbs) are in the nominative case.
  7. Pronoun - Objective Case Defined
    Pronouns used as objects of verbs and objects of prepositions are in the objective case.
  8. Pronoun - Possessive Case Defined
    Pronouns that show possession or ownership are in the possessive case.
  9. What is a pronoun called that is used when asking questions?
    Interrogative pronouns: who, which, and what. Interrogative pronouns are pronouns used when asking questions.
  10. What is a pronoun called that points out a particular person, place, or thing?
    Demonstrative pronouns: this, that, these, those, and such . Demonstrative pronouns point out a particular person, place, or thing.
  11. What is a Relative Pronoun?
    Relative pronouns: who, whoever, whom, whomever, whose, which, and that. Relative pronouns are pronouns that join or relate an adjective clause to the noun or pronoun modified by the clause. The noun or pronoun modified by the adjective clause is the antecedent of the relative pronoun introducing the clause.
  12. What is an Interogative Pronoun?
    Interrogative pronouns: who, which, and what. Interrogative pronouns are pronouns used when asking questions.
  13. What is a Demonstrative Pronoun?
    Demonstrative pronouns: this, that, these, those, and such . Demonstrative pronouns point out a particular person, place, or thing.Note: When using a demonstrative pronoun, be sure the particular person, place, or thing is clearly pointed out. Avoid vague references that permit ambiguity.

    Examples:

    1. These are my parents.

    2. This is my book.
  14. What is an Indefinite Pronoun?
    • Indefinite pronouns: everybody, anybody, somebody, either, neither, someone, nobody, anyone, no one, all, each, every, some, none, and one. Indefinite pronouns do not refer to a definite person or thing. Usually indefinite pronouns do not have antecedents.
    • Note: A verb agrees in number with an indefinite pronoun subject, not with the object of a phrase modifying it.

    Examples:

    • Each of the students was in the right place.
    • Many in the class were ready for the test.
  15. A collective pronoun is plural when the group acts as:

    a unit?
    or
    individuals?
    • A collective noun is singular when the group acts as a unit.
    • It is plural when the group acts as individuals.
    • When the antecedent is a collective noun, use the following guidelines.
    • When the group acts as a unit, use a singular pronoun. When the group acts as individuals, use a plural pronoun.
    • Examples:

    Singular: One team won its seventh game.

    Plural: The team purchased their sweaters.
  16. What is an indefinite pronoun?
    • The indefinite pronouns each, either, neither, somebody, anybody, nobody, someone, anyone, and no one are singular; therefore, a pronoun referring to any one of these words should also be singular.
    • A singular noun modified by each, every, either, or neither is singular.

    Examples: Everybody took his (not their) Bible to camp.

    Each of the students was accompanied by her (not their) parents.
  17. What is a Corrilative Conjunction?
    • Correlative Conjunction - conjunctions that are used in pairs
    • Some conjunctions are used in pairs. These pairs of words are called correlative conjunctions:

    • both . . . and
    • neither . . . nor
    • either . . . or
    • not only . . . but also
  18. Proper use of who or whom?
    "We give this award to Dexter, without whom we never would have found Mike's shoes."
    Note: Use care when choosing between which and that, and also between who and whom.

    Who and whom: Most students are comfortable with using he and him. If you don't know which form of who to use, think which form of he you would use in the sentence. If you would use he, use who. If you would use him, use whom.
  19. What are Coordinating Conjunctions?
    Coordinating Conjunctions are used to connect two or more words, phrases, or clauses of equal rank or significance. The most commonly used coordinating conjunctions are and, but, and or.

    Words: Maria is my friend and confidant.

    Phrases: If you remember to study and to keep up on your reading, you will do fine.

    Clauses: By running five miles a day and eating modest, balanced meals, Fred was able to lose twenty pounds.
  20. What are Correlative Conjunctions?
    Correlative conjunctions. Some conjunctions are used in pairs. These pairs of words are called correlative conjunctions:

    • both . . . and
    • neither . . . nor
    • either . . . or
    • not only . . . but also

    Study these examples:

    1. Some people dislike both dogs and cats.

    2. Either you stick with the program or you don't.

    3. Neither socks nor shoes can keep your feet warm in this weather.

    4. Not only is the movie well acted and entertaining, it also is very informative.
  21. What are Subordinating Conjunctions?
    • Subordinating conjunctions. Words that are used both to introduce subordinate clauses and to connect them to main clauses are called subordinating conjunctions.
    • Subordinating conjunctions introduce subordinate clauses that function in a sentence as adverb clauses.
    • These words are among those commonly used as subordinating conjunctions:

    • after because since till whenever
    • although before so that unless
    • where as if than until wherever
    • as if provided though when while
  22. What are Conjunctive Adverbs?
    • Conjunctive adverbs. Some adverbs are used to join main clauses. These connecting words are called conjunctive adverbs.
    • A conjunctive adverb is often preceded by a semicolon and is followed by a comma. It can also be preceded by a period.
    • These words are often used as conjunctive adverbs:

    • consequently hence
    • moreover therefore
    • furthermore however
    • nevertheless thus

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