Interpreting the Scriptures Lecture 5 – Literary Context and Analysis

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Interpreting the Scriptures Lecture 5 – Literary Context and Analysis
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Interpreting the Scriptures Lecture 5 – Literary Context and Analysis
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  1. What part of literary form is Prescript (sender, addressee, and greeting?
    Opening formula
  2. What is this describing?  X to Y, greetings (chairein),  Often with titles establishing one‘s role & authority, E.g., ―grace (charis) and peace (shalom/eirēnē) to you
    Prescript which is part of the literary form Opening Formula
  3.  What part of literary form is Thanksgiving/benediction?
    Opening Formula
  4. What is this describing? Often used to gain the goodwill or the audience; Often encapsulates the main theme of the letter
    Thanksgiving/benediction which is part of the literary form Opening Formula
  5. What part of literary form is Transitional formula (transition to the body)?
    Body
  6. What part of literary form is Topical Discussion?
    Body
  7. What part of literary form is Autobiographical Statements?
    Body
  8. What part of literary form is Travel Plans?
    Body
  9. What part of literary form is Exhortation?
    Body
  10. What part of literary form is Greetings?
    Closing
  11. What part of literary form is Doxology?
    Closing
  12. What part of literary form is Benediction?
    Closing
  13. What is this describing?  e.g., “I appeal to you brothers...” and “I want you to know brothers...”
    Transitional formula in the Literary Form Body
  14. What is this describing? Includes the purpose of the letter, E.g., health, business, love, eschatology, seeking good, Christian relationships, etc.
    Topical Discussion in the literary form Body
  15. What is this describing? Establish the moral character and conduct of the writer (appeal to “ethos”).
    Autobiographical statements in the literary form Body
  16. What is this describing? Especially plans to visit the recipients
    Travel plans in the literary form Body
  17. What is this describing? Advice or warning to depart from the evil and seek good; a number of commonplace or stock themes.
    Exhortation (GK paraenesis) in the literary form Body
  18. What is this describing? To those known by author and addressees.
    Greetings in the literary form Closing
  19. What is this describing? Glorifying God
    Doxology in the literary form Closing
  20. What is this describing? Final Blessing
    Benediction in the literary form Closing
  21. What liturgical form that Paul uses is this? A shorthand for salvation, e.g., grace and peace.
    Charis benediction (Eph 1:2; 2 Pet 1:2) 
  22. What liturgical form that Paul uses is this? A series of benefits extended from God to the people.
    Blessings (Eph 1:3f; Rom 1:25) 
  23. What liturgical form that Paul uses is this? A formula or short hymn that ascribes glory to God and often concludes the central section of Paul‘s letter. 
    Doxologies (Eph 3:21; Phil 4:20) 
  24. What liturgical form that Paul uses is this? Songs of the church that contain Jewish parallel thoughts. Some hymns became creeds. Paul may have included the Church‘s heart songs in his letters. 32.2.4.1  Eph 5:14b as an early church baptismal hymn 
    Hymns (Eph 5:19; Col 3:16; 1 Cor 14:26; Eph 1:3-14; Col 1:15-20; Phil 2:6-11;  1 Tim 3:16)
  25. What liturgical form that Paul uses is this? Short statements or interjections commonly used in the early church. 32.2.5.1  "Jesus is Lord" (1 Cor 12:3b; Rom 10:9) =perhaps this is the earliest church creed. 32.2.5.2  "God is one” (Eph 4:6);     32.2.5.3  "The Lord is one" (Eph 4:5; 1 Cor 8:6);       32.2.5.4  "What was formerly hidden is now revealed" formula (Eph 3:4-5;  Rom 16:25-26; 1 Cor 2:7-10) 
    Confessions and Acclamations (Eph 4:5-6; Rom 1:4)
  26. One of the Two hortatory forms:  The NT includes 23 lists of _________ of those who continually practice such things. Paul contrasts the works of the flesh and the works of the Spirit. Paul draws a line of demarcation for proper Christian behavior.  Ex) 1Cor 5:9-11 and 1 Cor 6:9-10 
    Vice Lists
  27. One of the two hortatory forms: The NT includes 23 lists of _________ of those who continually practice such things. Paul contrasts the works of the flesh and the works of the Spirit. Paul draws a line of demarcation for proper Christian behavior. Col 3:12-15 
    Virtue Lists
  28. What is this describing?  The household was the basic social unit in the Greco-Roman world. The Stoic household rules were designed to maintain social order. If the household became unstable, the whole empire could unravel.  A household could extend to scores of people. Three levels of submission and reciprocal obligations: Wives to husbands; Children to parents;Slaves to masters 
    Pauls household code of ethics
  29. What is this describing?  Paul had to walk a tightrope of balancing: Encouraging Christians to be good citizens and not enemies of society. Showing that Christianity does not subvert social behavior. Transforming these household relationships according to Christ‘s love.       Any change Paul makes to these relationships had to be subtle.  Therefore, today, we can miss how radical Paul is in revealing oppression and what is not redemptive in these relationships. It was radical for Paul to tell husbands that their bodies belonged to their wives, and that masters and slaves are both accountable to one Master. Paul sets a trajectory for mutual respect and equality. 
    Pauls purpose for the code of household ethics
  30. What type of rhetorical form is this a part of: Pathos
    Classical rhetorical forms
  31. What type of rhetorical form is this a part of: Ethos
    Classical rhetorical forms
  32. What type of rhetorical form is this a part of: Logos
    Classical rhetorical forms
  33. What type of rhetorical form is this a part of: Inclusio Inclusio is Latin for "confinement" (shutting off), where the opening phrase or idea is repeated, paraphrased, or otherwise returned to at the close of a unit. The opening and closing phrases may be informally referred to as literary "bookends" around a literary unit, passage or context.
    Other rhetorical forms
  34. What type of rhetorical form is this a part of: captatio benevolentiae This is the rhetorical art of captivating the benevolence of your audience (gaining their reception) in order to appeal to them. All educated Romans were versed in this art. 
    Other rhetorical forms
  35. What type of rhetorical form is this a part of: Chiasm In chiasm, parallels in a text correspond to each other in an X pattern; or it can be depicted linearly as A-B-C-C‘-B‘-A‘. A chiasm can be as brief as one verse or as elaborate as a whole poem, parable, or book. In using this devise, an author can show both progression of thought and intensification of meaning (climax). Jews, writing in Hebrew, frequently used chiasm. Paul adopted chiasm for writing in Greek. 
    Other rhetorical forms
  36. What is this a description of?   used to open the audience‘s mood to the author or speaker.
    Classical rhetorical form Pathos
  37. What is this a description of?used to establish the author/speaker‘s own moral character and undermine their opponent‘s character. 
    Classical rhetorical form Ethos
  38. What is this a description of? used to appeal to logic and reason.
    Classical rhetorical form Logos
  39. What is this a description of? ______ is Latin for "confinement" (shutting off), where the opening phrase or idea is repeated, paraphrased, or otherwise returned to at the close of a unit. The opening and closing phrases may be informally referred to as literary "bookends" around a literary unit, passage or context.      32.5.1.1  Ps 8:1 and 9: "O Lord, our Lord, how majestic is your name in all the earth!"        32.5.1.2  Am 1:3, 6, 9, 11, 13;2:1, 4, 6: "This is what the Lord says," marking off discrete oracles.       32.5.1.3  Mk 8:22-10:52: Three passion predictions by Jesus are framed by two healings of blind men.      32.5.1.4  2 Thess 2:2, 15 bracketed with "by word or by letter" (in Gk text)    32.5.1.5  1 Cor 12:4-11, "the same Spirit"     32.5.1.6  1 Cor 14:1b-39, "seek to prophesy" (Gk text) 
    The “Other rhetorical form” Inclusio
  40. What is this a description of? This is the rhetorical art of captivating the benevolence of your audience (gaining their reception) in order to appeal to them. All educated Romans were versed in this art.    32.5.2.1  Acts 24:2-4      32.5.2.2  Acts 26:2-3         32.5.2.3  Rom 1:8        32.5.2.4  1 Cor 11:2         32.5.2.5  3 Jn 2-6 
    The “Other rhetorical form” captatio benevolentiae
  41. What is this a description of? In ____________, parallels in a text correspond to each other in an X pattern; or it can be depicted linearly as A-B-C-C‘-B‘-A‘. A ______ can be as brief as one verse or as elaborate as a whole poem, parable, or book. In using this devise, an author can show both progression of thought and intensification of meaning (climax). Jews, writing in Hebrew, frequently used ______. Paul adopted _____for writing in Greek. 
    The “Other rhetorical form” Chiasm
  42. What is this describing? Theme Changes: Each literary unit has a theme, which, in turn, are sub-themes of the book. See if a change in personal pronoun corresponds to a change in subject matter. Paul does this in Romans but not often in Ephesians.
    A method of analyzing structure
  43. What is this describing? Literary forms embedded in the genre: What literary forms are found in the text? How do they fit into their literary units? How do they help you distinguish literary units? How do they support the theme of their literary unit?
    A method of analyzing structure
  44. What is this describing? Transitional words: Identify transitional words or phrases, i.e., conjunctions or connectives.
    A method of analyzing structure
  45. What is this describing? Clusters of one-sentence summaries of paragraphs How do your one-sentence summaries of paragraphs cluster together and differentiate themselves from the other clusters?
    A method of analyzing structure
  46. What is this describing? What major themes arise from the text? Paul‘s letters usually include 3-5 dominant ideas or themes.
    How to recognize themes
  47. What is this a part of? What does ―heavenly realms‖ (NIV) mean in Ephesians? Heavenly realms are the spiritual sphere where God, Christ, and the hostile powers of darkness operate; and it is where spiritual warfare occurs.
    Word study - identify the meaning of key words (conspicuous terms)
  48. What is this a part of? What does the word “mystery” mean? What meaning best fits Eph 3 (esp. vv. 2-13)? State in one sentence the mystery to which Paul refers in Eph 3:9. Now compare this with the use of the term mystery in 1:9 in its context. Mystery is a secret that God knows, holds and reveals to certain people via special revelation. It is God‘s eternal counsel, hidden from the world, but revealed and fulfilled in Christ.
    Word study - identify the meaning of key words (conspicuous terms)
  49. What is this a part of? How many ways does Paul indicate unity in 4:1-16?
    Word study - identify the meaning of key words (conspicuous terms)
  50. What is this a part of? What does “greed” refer to in 5:3-5? Greed is basically idolatry.
    Word study - identify the meaning of key words (conspicuous terms)
  51. What is this a part of? What are “rulers,” “authorities,” “powers,” and “the spiritual forces of evil” in Eph. 6:12? These are the demonic forces of evil a work in the world and the heavenly realms.
    Word study - identify the meaning of key words (conspicuous terms)
  52. What is this a part of? How do these parts illuminate the whole and vice versa?
    Word study - identify the meaning of key words (conspicuous terms)

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