Special Education Assessment

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Author:
dc1157
ID:
73482
Filename:
Special Education Assessment
Updated:
2011-03-17 10:07:20
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sped assessment
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Description:
Assessments in special education
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  1. Informal Assessement
    • teachers asses students to check:
    • 1. level of academic functioning
    • 2. learning process
    • 3. motivation factors
    • 4. social interactions
    • 5.desirable and undesirable behavior
  2. Advantages of Informal Assessement
    • 1. Interprets performance on each item
    • 2. similar to teaching program
    • 3. teacher involvement
    • 4. simplicity of design
    • 5. broader range of students progress
    • 6. can collect information continuosly.
  3. Limititations of Informal Assessement
    • Greates limitation lack of technical information
    • 1. norms not important since we are not comparing to norm sample.
    • 2. lack of information about reliability and validity
    • a. at minimum, content validity should be evaluated
    • 1. do items represented content domain
    • 2. are task appropiate
  4. Guidilines to Construct Informal Test
    • 1. know what you are testing
    • 2. consider how you intend to use this information
    • 3. make a plan for your test
    • 4. avoid "trick questioins" or ambiguity
    • 5. measure students ability to apply skills they have learned
    • 6. make sure the students have the ability to respond
    • 7. set criterion level.
  5. Diagnostic procedure use in Informal test
    OBSERVATION
    • Behavior must be observable and measurable
    • A. observational recording systems measure
    • 1. Frequency- measures the number of times a behavior occurs.
    • a. event recording
    • b. interval recording
    • c. time sampling
    • 2. Time-measures the length of a behavior
    • a. duration recording
    • b. latency recording
    • B. Analyze students' work samples to determine
    • a. what skills the child has acquired
    • b. what areas require assistance.
    • 1. permanent product recording
    • 2. error analysis
  6. Curriculum-Based Assessement Strategies
    • -results used for instructional programming
    • A. Criterion-referenced tests-evaluate skills through specific criteria that have been set for students.
    • 1. inventories-preteaching assessment tool to determine educational needs
    • 2. quizzes/tests-assess wheter students have acquired skills they were tought
    • B. Task Analysis- break complex taks into teachable components.
    • 1. Each step is presented to student to identify
    • -where students can perform wihtout error
    • -where the breakdown in learning occurs
    • -& skills that must be learned to perform task
    • C. Relationship between criterion-referenced testing and task analysis.
    • 1. Criterion-referenced testing-determines what tasks students can and cannot perform
    • 2.Task analysis pinpoints where learning process broke down.
  7. Curriculum Based Measurements
    • Procedures using informants: teachers, parent, peer, student.
    • A. Checklists and rating scales-help teachers focus on specific behaviors
    • 1. Disavantages- teacher bias & inter-rater reliability
    • B. Inteviews - others familiar with student's past performance
    • -danger of inaccuracy
    • 1. Students interview-designed to identify
    • -strategies students uses twhen attempting to perform task
    • -process/error strategy student follow in completing task
  8. Reading Assessment
    • Traditional approaches to reading assessment & instruction tend to be skill-based
    • A.Several
    • different categories of skills make up reading & reading
    • assessment:
    • 1. Oral Reading Skills - assesses the accuracy & fluency of a student’s oral reading
    • 2. Comprehension Skills - refers to ability to understand what is read
    • • Literal Comprehension
    • • Inferential comprehension
    • • Listening Comprehension
    • 3. Word Attack Skills - used to derive meaning &/or pronunciation of unknown words
    • • phonetic analysis
    • • structural analysis
    • • context clues
    • 4. Word Recognition Skills - measure sight vocabulary
    • 5. Rate of Reading - not concerned with this aspect with students with
    • reading difficulties
    • Other
    • Behaviors - spelling, handwriting, auditory discrimination
    • B.No reading test evaluates all aspects of reading completely:
    • •some tests evaluate a wide range of reading skills (e.g., Woodcock
    • Reading Mastery
    • Test–Revised-Normative Update)
    • • other tests focus on a narrower set of skills (e.g., Gray Oral Reading Test–4th Edition)
    • • most diagnostic reading tests will sample both decoding and comprehension skills
  9. Informal Reading Inventory
    • Most frequently used classroom technique for informal assessment in reading
    • IRIs contain:
    • A.Word recognition inventories - graded word list taken from each level of reading material
    • B.Reading passages - a series of sequentially graded selections that increase in difficulty
    • C.Comprehension questions - student answers questions on the material read
    • Reading
    • levels measured by the IRI:
    • A.Independent level
    • •Word recognition96 - 100% accuracy
    • •Comprehensionat least 90% accuracy
    • Instructional level
    • •Word recognition90 - 95% accuracy
    • •Comprehensionat least 75% accuracy
    • C.Frustrational level
    • •Word recognitionless than 90% accuracy
    • •Comprehensionbelow 75% accuracy

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