Persuasion Test!

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Persuasion Test!
2011-03-31 20:28:15
fallacies persuasive essay

Test- Friday, April 1st, 2011 :(
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  1. strategic use of language to move an audience to action or belief
  2. an appeal to one's sense of ethics or his standards of what constitues proper behavior (ethical appeal)
  3. an appeal to emotion
  4. an appeal to logic; an appeal to one's sense of reason, usually the strongest type of apppeal
  5. Celeberty endorsement is and example of....
  6. the writer's readers
  7. the writer's dominant goal
  8. something known to be true or real; that which has actually occured; a statement of truth which can be proven valid through observation, calculation, experimentation, measurement or research; an absolute
  9. a belief held, often without positive knowledge or proof; a judgement, personal idea, preference, throught, or feeling
  10. an idea that is presented as a fact, yet in reality is an untruth
  11. a statement that refers to a common characteristic of several items- people, places, animals, objects or events
  12. a statement that refers too broadly to people, places, animals, objects or events
  13. words that account for acceptions
    i.e. "some"
    limiting words
  14. a sentence that states clearly and concisely the main position that you wish to support with your argument
    thesis for persuasion
  15. a rewording of the thesis idea; on persuasive writing, it many include a call to action for the reader
    conclusion for persuasion
  16. feelings or hunches that are inappropriate for persuasive argumentation
    personal preference
  17. flaws in reasning that will render an argument invalid
    logical fallacies
  18. an intentional slanting of the truth about people or events to further one's own cause or to damage an opposing cause; may use facts, lies, distortions, or appeals to emotion
  19. attempt to show why something happens, why something is the way it is
    opinions that explain
  20. make judgements; indicating good and bad points
    opinions that evaluate
  21. make claims about the future
    opinions that preidct
  22. present views about what people or orginazations should do
    opinions that advise
  23. An appropriate thesis statement should...
    • be in positive terms
    • have at least two ways of thinking
    • avoid vague, generalized statements
    • be worth fighting for
    • be one in which a resolution is conceivable
    • be yet to be decided
  24. focusing on a person's lifestyle, the issue is evaded
    ad hominem
  25. when used, the reader should consider the expertise of the source
    appeal to false authority
  26. refusing to back up a disputed claim
    "that's just how it is"
    bare assertion
  27. someone may imply that your argument is not true because his own is in the majority
    appeal to force
  28. since no one has proven a claim, it must be false
    appeal to ignorance
  29. falsely connects emotion to an issue
    appeal to pity
  30. trying to "show" someone with an impressive fact
    i.e " I paid $6465789643165798 for this outfit, don't you love it?!?"
    appeal to popularity (bandwagon)
  31. associating something with a popular virtue such as patriotism
    appeal to popular sentiment
  32. the premises include the claim that the conclusion is true or (directly or indirectly) assume that the conclusion is true
    begging the question
  33. 'reducing all possible options to two extremes
    black and white thinking
  34. presenting one argument and downplaying the other in order to mislead the audience
    card stacking
  35. "x" is good or bad because it is like or unlike "Y"
    flase analogy
  36. assuming that because two things happened, the first one caused the second one
    false cause
  37. basing conclusions on inadewuate evidence
    hasty generalization
  38. what one supposes would have happen if one thing or another had happened instead
    hypothesis contrary to fact
  39. over-simplifying things
  40. violate and contriversial topics that sidetrack everyone involved
    red herring
  41. assuming that one thing leads to another, causing a chain of other positive or negative events to follow
    slippery slope