Attitudes Test 3

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skeetyr
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79048
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Attitudes Test 3
Updated:
2011-04-12 07:01:48
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Attitudes Test
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Attitudes Test 3
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  1. 11-1: Compliance-gaining studies focus primarily on the receiver, not the sender
    False
  2. 11-2: Some research supports that when we’re faced with non-compliance in the receiver, we’re more likely to use reward or punishment strategies compared to the initial attempt.
    True
  3. 11-3: Of the three couple-type categories, those in the “traditional” type tend to avoid conflict
    False
  4. 11-4: A person with a formal title has “referent power.”
    False
  5. 11-5: Threats are not seen as polite as hints, but threats seem to be more effective
    False
  6. 11-6: According to some research, doctors avoid using threatening strategies unless positive
    strategies fail to work.
    True
  7. 11-7: A person operating under the “expressive design logic” perception of communication is more effective than a person operating under the rhetorical design logic.
    False
  8. 11-8: A person operating under the “rhetorical design logic” perception tends to be more proactive in compliance gaining attempts
    True
  9. 11-9: Because of the vast number of potential persuasive strategies, some researchers suggest
    not focusing on features of strategies, but the creation of a finite list
    (typology).
    False
  10. 11-10: Because of social desirability bias, the compliance-gaining strategy people report using is often not the one they actually use.
    True
  11. 11-11: The “primary goal” of compliance-gaining is maintaining personal identity; influencing the other is a secondary goal
    False
  12. 11-12: Usually, we are concerned with either efficiency or appropriateness as goals in
    compliance, not both.
    False
  13. 12-13: Most research has found that we do not look away when lying.
    True
  14. 12-14: According to information
    manipulation theory, we assume people give us truthful information.
    True
  15. 12-15: People that lie are more likely to admit they do not remember things.
    False
  16. 12-16:Pupil dilation has not been found to be a reliable indicator of deception.
    False
  17. 12-17: Some research finds that people that lie do not think as hard as truth tellers do.
    False
  18. 12-18: Interpersonal deception theory asserts that our non-strategic attempts at deception are those not under our control.
    True
  19. 12-19: A person with a Machiavellian personality is very concerned about the welfare of
    others.
    False
  20. 12-20: Women are better than men are at controlling their nonverbal behavior.
    False
  21. 12- 21: The greater our motivation is to lie, the greater our attempts to control our behavior.
    True
  22. 12-22: Some research asserts that detecting lies may be a skill; some people are better at detecting lies than others.
    True
  23. 12-23 Law enforcement officers, custom officials, and lawyers professionally trained in detecting liars are typically better at it than the average person.
    False
  24. 12-24: Research suggests intimate and positive relationships may lead to truth bias, where we assume the other tells the truth.
    True
  25. 2-25: Our use of the probing heuristic results in greater accuracy on detecting a lie.
    False
  26. 3-26: Motivational appeals tend to come more from external influences, rather than internal
    motivators.
    True
  27. 3-27: As fear increases, persuasion decreases.
    True
  28. 3-28: Self-efficacy and response efficacy enhance the ability of fear appeals to trigger productive responses.
    True
  29. 3-29: Positive portrayals of suffering individuals decreases the likelihood of donations, but increases the likelihood of volunteerism.
    True
  30. 3-30: Guilt appeals should be designed to increase negative self-feelings
    False
  31. 3-31: Humor enhances persuasion only indirectly;
    it operates in the peripheral-mode of cognitive processing.
    True
  32. 3-32: We should be careful in using humor that makes fun of ourselves if we haven’t established strong credibility with the receiver(s).
    True
  33. 3-33: Appeals to patriotism are not effective in enhancing persuasion.
    False
  34. 3-34: The usefulness of sex appeals in persuasion is clear. Regardless of context, they
    work.
    False
  35. 3-35: “Sucking up” to the boss in
    organizational settings is an effective persuasion technique.
    True
  36. 3-36: Persuasive appeal techniques are complex, so even if they don’t conflict, they should not be combined.
    False
  37. 4-37: Picture superiority effect asserts that pictures are easier to recognize, but are not easier to remember, in comparison to words.
    False
  38. 4-38: Iconicity refers to the power of images to summarize concepts and ideas, even if the
    representation is not accurate.
    True
  39. 4-39: Images do not have the ability to suggest cause-effect relationships.
    True
  40. 4-40: Awareness through interpretation refers to the persuasive effects of activist art, which stimulates viewers’ curiosity and triggers peripheral processing.
    False
  41. 4-41: Collaborative art, like the AIDS Quilt, persuade by getting people to understand an issue in
    abstract terms, not concrete terms.
    False
  42. 4-42: With regard to movies, in order for “viewer identification” to be persuasive, the viewers’ experiences must have significant overlap with the character in the movie.
    False
  43. 4-43: Movies perpetuate stereotypes, but younger viewers are less likely to affected, as they are more tolerant of diversity
    True
  44. 4-44:The display of smoking in popular movies has been tied to an increase in smoking among teenage viewers.
    True
  45. 4-45: Anti-ads work because viewers tend to trust the media.
    False
  46. 4-46: Aspirational brands are prestigious, desirable, and just within the reach of the targeted
    consumer.
    False
  47. 4-47: "Shockvertising,” while ethically questionable, can be very persuasive.
    True
  48. 5-48: A subliminal ad is one that is barely recognizable and barely above our awareness.
    False
  49. 5-49: Subliminal techniques’ ability to act as a “priming” mechanism is supported by experimental
    research, but no support exists for it in real world applications.
    True
  50. 5-50: Self-improvement tapes that employ subliminal messages may offer help through a placebo effect, but no evidence suggests that they work due to the subliminal messages.
    True
  51. 5-51: Recordings that contain backwards lyrics simply do not exist.
    False
  52. 5-52: Product placement in TV shows and movies are examples of subliminal advertising
    False
  53. 5-53: Neurolinguistic programming has found strong support as an effective persuasive technique
    False
  54. 5-54: Music works as a persuasion tool because it can trigger both central and/or peripheral route processing
    True
  55. 5-55: Congruency enhances the effectiveness of music in advertising
    True
  56. 5-56: Background music can have a beneficial effect on a customer’s shopping experience
    True
  57. 5-57:There is a correlation between juvenile behavior and expressions of sexuality and
    violence in music videos. It is clear that videos cause an increase in those behaviors in juveniles.
    True
  58. 5-58: Music is likely to have its greatest effect on highly motivated and involved receivers.
    False
  59. 15-59: Carefully chosen fragrances can alter moods.
    True
  60. 16- 60 : The tools of persuasion are neither ethical nor unethical; communicator motives define the morality of the behavior.
    True
  61. 16-61: Because Western cultures are more likely than other cultures to rely logic and rationality, the ethics of persuasion are not consistent across cultures.
    True
  62. 16-62: A person using a consequentialist approach identifies acts as right or wrong, regardless of consequences.
    False
  63. 16-63: A person operating under a deontological approach to ethics is unlikely to support the idea of situational ethical analysis.
    True
  64. 16-64: To be ethically responsible for a persuasive act, the authors maintain that the persuaders’ persuasion must be intentional.
    True
  65. 16-65: The authors suggest that nonverbal persuasive techniques may be less ethical
    than verbal means because the intentions of verbal persuasion are more easily recognized.
    True
  66. 16-66: The “tolerance” quality of the “persuaders as lovers” issue suggests that we must listen to those we persuade. However, we do not have to be willing to be persuaded ourselves.
    False
  67. 16-67: The use of credibility as the primary means of persuasion results in long-term attitude changes.
    False
  68. 16-68:Threats are an ethical means of persuasion, but only provided the outcome is clearly beneficial to the other(s), and no more positive method is available or likely to succeed.
    False
  69. 16-69: The authors suggest that if fear appeals are used, the receivers must be provided a means of dealing with the fear.
    True
  70. 16-70:The authors suggest that persuasion via appeals to emotion, rather than reason, are not ethical.
    False

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