Ch 8 Pelvis

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Ch 8 Pelvis
2011-05-02 17:20:07
pelvis anatomy

Lymphatics and Vasculature aspects of the pelvis
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  1. As in other parts of the body, the lymphatics of the pelvis are generally not visible on sectional images unless
    pathology is present and causes the nodes to enlarge
  2. Image B demonstrates an enlarged lymph node (N) adjacent to the uterus (U). Image A demonstrates the reason for the enlarged lymph node. The "T" labels a tumor in the urinary bladder. The enlarged node is suspicious for metastasis.
  3. The arteries of the pelvis provide blood supply for the pelvic viscera, hip and thigh region, posterior sacrum, and inferior spinal cord and join with other arteries to supply the anterior and lateral walls of the abdomen. The screen image is from a computed tomography angiography (CTA) study. This frontal image demonstrates the larger arteries.
  4. The primary venous drainage of the pelvis is provided by the internal iliac veins and their tributaries. The tributaries of the internal iliac vein are almost synonymous with the branches of the internal iliac artery. The internal iliac veins run medial to the internal iliac arteries, and the veins of the pelvis also follow a course close to the arteries. The internal and external iliac veins join to form the common iliac veins, which, in turn, join to form the inferior vena cava at about the level of L5.
  5. Many of the lymph node groups lie adjacent to the pelvic vessels and share the vessel name. Those nodal groups that correspond to pelvic vessels include the:
    • Common iliac – 2 groups
    • -Median group
    • -Lateral group
    • Internal iliac
    • External iliac
    • Sacral
  6. The inguinal lymph nodes are divided into two groups: (1) superficial and (2) deep.
  7. The inguinal lymph nodes are located near the
    common femoral vessels and at the ischial tuberosities