Philosophy Final

Card Set Information

Author:
upcpk
ID:
84044
Filename:
Philosophy Final
Updated:
2011-05-07 01:56:08
Tags:
ethics morality hedonism John Stuart Mill social philosophy contract theory JOhn Locke Examined Life
Folders:

Description:
last exam for TCC intro to philosophy - roberts
Show Answers:

Home > Flashcards > Print Preview

The flashcards below were created by user upcpk on FreezingBlue Flashcards. What would you like to do?


  1. In the opening sequence of this episode, the fate of teh following creatures is used to illustrate differences in ideas about morality

    a. alligators being raised for making handbags
    b. turkeys being raised for thanksgiving dinners
    c. lobsters in a restaurant aquarium
    d. dolphins trapped and drowning in gill nets
    c. lobsters in a restaurant aquarium
  2. According to some philosophers, to insist that one should show tolerance toward other cultures, since morality is culturally relative is to take a position

    a. supported by the world's major religions
    b. which is inconsistent
    c. of fact marked by the truth
    d. typical of Democrats
    b. which is inconsistent
  3. The case of the Dutchman, Johannes van Damme, raised the issue of

    a. distinguishing Holland from the Netherlands
    b. whether there are legitimate, international war crimes
    c. international monetary responsibility and punishment
    d. the cross cultural legitimacy of the death penalty
    d. the cross cultural legitimacy of the death penalty
  4. According to some philosophers in this episode, the issue of moral relativity must include not only variations or differences in moral belief but

    a.there being "good reasons" for holding a belief
    b. whether or not a person was raised to hold the belief
    c. whether or not a person's community unanimously accepts the belief
    d. does the belief have any real "cash" value
    a.there being "good reasons" for holding a belief
  5. Emotivism is the view that moral language is essentially

    a. a description of subtle moral facts
    b. an expression of certain emotions and feelings
    c. a language with truth value similar to scientific language
    d. used by people when they are highly emotional
    b. an expression of certain emotions and feelings
  6. According to emotivism as discussed in this episode, language can be used both

    a. descriptively and expressively
    b. by psychologists and philosophers
    c. culturally and socially
    d. interntionally and unintentionally
    a. descriptively and expressively
  7. For an emotivist, moral judgments are

    a. either true or false
    b. neither true nor false
    c. always true and never false
    d. sometimes false but never true
    b. neither true nor false
  8. According to James Rachels, conducting his interview in the nude would be

    a. morally wrong in an absolutist sense
    b. morally neutral but aesthetically problematic
    c. morally obligatory but illegal
    d. grossly immoral but only in our culture
    b. morally neutral but aesthetically problematic
  9. If someone argues against moral relativism, saying that the core of morality has to do wtih promoting human welfare, then according to this episode one must

    a. give a nonreativistic account of human welfare
    b. face the issue of the immortality of the soul
    c. confront so much superstition in teh world
    d. guarantee that this is a genuine expression of one's emotions
    a. give a nonreativistic account of human welfare
  10. According to this episode, the problem of child labor affects

    a. approximately 800,000 children worldwide
    b. approximately 5.5 million children worldwide
    c. approximately 25 million children worldwide
    d. over 250 million children worldwide
    d. over 250 million children worldwide
  11. T or F

    Ethical absolutism state that one and only one correct morality exists
    True
  12. T or F

    Ethical relativism and cultural relativism are the same
    False
  13. T or F

    According to James Rachels, "the fact that different societies have different moral codes proves nothing."
    True
  14. T or F

    The fact that all societies have to accept certain moral standards to survive shows that ethical relativism is true
    False
  15. T or F

    A fundamental point the theory of ethical relativism is trying to make is that we should be tolerant of the moral beliefs of others and not assume our own are the only correct ones
    True
  16. Ethics
    the branch of philosophy that tries to determine the good and right thing to do
  17. ethical absolutism
    a view that denies the existence of any universally applicable moral standard; a view that claims that the truth or validity of a moral standard is not absolute but depend on the standards held or accepted by a social group
  18. Utilitariansim was a product of the philosophy of which era?

    a. ancient Greece
    b. the enlightenment
    c. the Industrial Revolution
    d. twentieth century Global Capitalism
    b. the enlightenment
  19. Which two forces govern the actions of humans according to Bentham?

    a. good and evil
    b. right and wrong
    c. pain and pleasure
    d. crime and punishment
    c. pain and pleasure
  20. Bentham and his follower, John Stuart Mill, championed social reforms such as women's right to vote and humane punishment because

    a. they benefitted the rights of individuals
    b. they were likely to produce the greatest good for the greatest number
    c. they produced good results
    d. they increased the level of pleasure in society
    b. they were likely to produce the greatest good for the greatest number
  21. John Stuart Mill added a new dimension to the utilitarian movement by

    a. asserting that there are qualitative differences among pleasures and pains
    b. his belief in the greatest happiness for the greatest number of people
    c. measuring the quantitative differences among pleasures and pains
    d. judging actions by their conequences only
    a. asserting that there are qualitative differences among pleasures and pains
  22. Which utiliarian philosopher had himself preserved as an "auto-icon"?

    a. John Stuart Mill
    b. Jim Mill
    c. G. E. Moore
    d. Jeremy Bentham
    d. Jeremy Bentham
  23. Consequentialism holds that

    a. no actions are intrinsically immoral
    b. some actions are always immoral
    c. pleasure and pain determine an action's value
    d. the net costs of an action determine its value
    a. no actions are intrinsically immoral
  24. The theory of ideal utilitarianism was proposed by

    a. James Mill
    b. Peter Singer
    c. G.E. Moore
    d. Jonathan Glover
    c. G.E. Moore
  25. Sentient creatures, natural habitats, and goods such as art and love, according to G.E. Moore, have

    a. qualitative value
    b. moral value
    c. intrinsic value
    d. qualitative value
    c. intrinsic value
  26. Norwegian philosopher Arne Naess has argued that

    a. the value of the environment can be expressed quantitatively
    b. certain natural habitats are living entitied and as such can claim equal moral status to that of human beings
    c. the sacrifice of natural habitats is justifiable if it promotes social justice
    d. it is impossible to measure and compare the values of different cultures
    b. certain natural habitats are living entitied and as such can claim equal moral status to that of human beings
  27. According to philosopher JOnathan Glover,

    a. natural habitats have intrinsic value
    b. it is impossible to make precise interpersonal comparisons
    c. the attempts to calculate the costs of large scale projects such as the Bakun dam are a "formula for catastrophe."
    d. in ethics, all that matters is how humans are affected by decisions
    d. in ethics, all that matters is how humans are affected by decisions
  28. Utilitariansim, according to Peter Singer, should consider only

    a. pleasure and pain
    b. intrinsic values
    c. the greatest benefit for the greatest number
    d. net costs
    a. pleasure and pain
  29. T or F

    Egoism is the view that holds that only pleasure is worth having for its own sake.
    False
  30. T or F

    Some ethicists think that the most serious weakness of ethical egoism is that it undermines the moral point of view
    True
  31. T or F

    John Stuart Mill developed a hedonistic calculus that determines how much pleasure an action produces based only on quantitative criteria
    False
  32. T or F

    Rule utilitariansim holds that as a rule in each particular act we should strive to produce the greatest happiness for the most people
    False
  33. T or F

    The members of the Ramsey Colloquium use act utilitariansim to argue that moral rules tolerant of homosexuality, adultery, and divorce have harmful effects on society and so should not be followed
    False
  34. Consequentialist theory
    in ethics,the position that the morality of an action is determined by its nonmoral consequences
  35. Egoism
    ethical theory that contends that we act morally when we act in a way that promotes our own interests
  36. Hedonism (Epicurious)
    the view that only pleasure is intrinsically worthwhile

    ("good consequences are those that produce pleasure for oneself, whereas bad consequences are those that produce pain")
  37. Utilitarianism
    theory that we should act in such a way that our actions produce the greatest happiness or pleasure
  38. Act Utilitarianism
    in normative ethics, the position that an action is moral if it produces the greatest happiness for the most people
  39. Rule Utilitarianism
    the normative ethical position that we should act so that the rule governing our actions is the one that would produce the greatest happiness for the most peopel if everyone were to follow it
  40. John Stuart Mill
    for the inductionsit empiricist, real science is distinguished from opinion, superstition, and bias by its reliance on generalization from particular sensory observations and by repeated confirmations
  41. Jeremy Bentham
    -pleasure/pain
    -Hedonistic calculus
    - "nature has placed mankind under the governance of 2 soveriegn masters, pain and pleasure. They govern us in all we do, in all we say, in all we think. The principle of utility recognizes this subjection"

    - ??
  42. According to Immanuel Kant, the source of morality is
    a. divine commands
    b. pleasure
    c. the laws of the state
    d. reason
    d. reason
  43. The only thing that is good without qualification is, for Kant,

    a. good will
    b. gifts of nature such as courage and resolution
    c. talents of the midn such as wit and intelligence
    d. gifts of fortune, such as health and power
    a. good will
  44. Within the Kantian moral system, a maxim is

    a. the highest good
    b. laws enacted unjustly
    c. the rule or reason by which a person acts
    d. the act with the best consequences
    c. the rule or reason by which a person acts
  45. The categorical imperative asks

    a. "is the maxim of my action the most beneficial?"
    b. "Can the maxim of my action give the greatest pleasure?"
    c. "Can the maxim of my action be consistent with divine law?"
    d. "Can I will the maxim of my action to be a universal law?"
    d. "Can I will the maxim of my action to be a universal law?"
  46. For Kant, if an action can be made a universal law then

    a. all autonomous beings will act according to it
    b. all autonomous beings could act according to it
    c. all autonomous beings have already acted according to it
    d. it is a part of science and not morality
    b. all autonomous beings could act according to it
  47. Kant uses the following example to illustrate an application of the categorical imperative

    a. making a false promise
    b. peeping in someone's window
    c. joining the military
    d. returning lost money
    a. making a false promise
  48. According to a second formulation of the categorical imperative persons

    a. are only to be treated as ends, and never as means
    b. are to be treated as ends, and only as a means if that is beneficial overall
    c. can be treated as a means as long as no cruelty is invloved
    d. are to be treated only as a means and never as an end
    a. are only to be treated as ends, and never as means
  49. Kantian ethics is an attempt to describe a morality that

    a. guarantees eternal salvation
    b. allows one to live a happy life
    c. reflect the difinity of persons
    d. allow one to be envied for one's good works
    c. reflect the difinity of persons
  50. A traditional problem with the Kantian system of morality is

    a. how to get people to do what is moral
    b. resolving apparent conflicts between competing duties
    c. teaching children how to act on such abstract thinking
    d. being able to prove that universal laws actually exist
    b. resolving apparent conflicts between competing duties
  51. T or F

    Scriptural divine command theories hold that we should obey God's commands as these are embodied in a set of sacred scriptures.
    True
  52. T or F

    The natural law ethics of Thomas Aquinas claims that we have a moral obligation to pursue those goods toward which we are naturally inclined.
    True
  53. T or F

    In his Groundwork of the Metaphysics of Morals, Kant claims that ethics relies on a consideration of consequences
    False
  54. T or F

    Kant argues that every human being has a price and the trick is to calculate the exact value of each person
    False
  55. T or F

    For Kant, to respoect a person as an end is to respect her capacity to freely and knowingly choose for herself what she will do
    True
  56. Nonconsequentialist theory
    a theory that holds that the morality of an action is determined by more than just its consequences
  57. Divine Command Theory

    - implications
    a nonsequential normative theory that says we should always do what God commands; the view that actions are morally right if and only if God commands or permits them, and morally wrong if and only if God forbids them
  58. Natural Law Ethics

    - Epictetus
    -Thomas Aquinas
    a pattern of necessary and universal regularity; a universal moral imperative derived from the nature of things; a moral standard inferred from the nature of human beings that indicates how everyone ought to behave

    - the natural law in its universal character can in no way be blotted out from men's hearts
  59. Immanuel Kant

    -"good will"
    - Categorical Imperative
    - duty
    - implications
    • - good will - one that chooses what is morally right because it is right and not becuase it is pleasurable or in one's self-interest
    • -categorical imperative - the basic principle of morality is the conclusion (3) of the preceding arguement, which says that to be a morally good person i must never do something unless it is what i believe everyone ought to do
  60. Buddhist Ethics
    - 4 Noble Truths
    - Nirvana
    • -
    • -enlightentment comes when the limited, clinging self is extinguished
  61. Virtue ethics tends to focus on

    A. institutions
    B. rituals
    C. character
    D. actions
    C. character
    (this multiple choice question has been scrambled)
  62. In ancient Greece, virtue was synonymous with

    A. obligation
    B. natural right
    C. excellence
    D. duty
    C. excellence
    (this multiple choice question has been scrambled)
  63. A core concept to the ancient Greek ethical theory was

    A. eudaimonia
    B. euphoria
    C. euthanasia
    D. europa
    A. eudaimonia
  64. In ancient Greece, if you mastered a number of virtues, then you were said to possess

    A. knowledge
    B. pleasure
    C. power
    D. phronesis
    D. phronesis
    (this multiple choice question has been scrambled)
  65. Virtue ethic,s as opposed to utilitariansim or Kantianism, does not attempt to provide a

    A. any role for an indiviual's history or emotions
    B. any consideration fo what a person should do
    C. formula or decision procedure for evaluating all actions
    D. any method for attaining happiness
    C. formula or decision procedure for evaluating all actions
    (this multiple choice question has been scrambled)
  66. The modern ethical theories of utilitariansim and Kantianism, does not attempt to provide primarily a

    A. a method for individuals to attain happiness
    B. formula or decision procedure for evaluating
    C. some cosideration for the person's character
    D. role for an individual's history and/or emotional sensitivity
    B. formula or decision procedure for evaluating
    (this multiple choice question has been scrambled)
  67. According to Aristotle, virtue is to be found in the

    A. commands of the gods
    B. maxim which can be consistently applied to all rational beings
    C. the greatest good for the greatest number
    D. mean between deficiency and excess
    D. mean between deficiency and excess
    (this multiple choice question has been scrambled)
  68. Generosity has been described as that virtue which falls between

    A. stinginess and profligacy
    B. impulsiveness and inexorableness
    C. cowardice and bravado
    D. spitefulness and beneficence
    A. stinginess and profligacy
    (this multiple choice question has been scrambled)
  69. According to this episode, a strenght of virtue ethics over ethical theories such as Kantiansim is

    A. the conceptual distinction between actions and behaviors
    B. an emphasis upon consequences of an action
    C. the emphasis upont he significance of intention
    D. the inclusion of the emotions and personal history
    D. the inclusion of the emotions and personal history
    (this multiple choice question has been scrambled)
  70. According to this episode, a weakness of virtue ethics may be found in the fact that

    A. conflicts between virtues or sets of virtues held by different peopel or communities cannot be resolved by appealing to a virtue
    B. it's an old, even ancient, theory fro dealing with life
    C. a society such as ours is not really concerned with living virtuously, but rather in acquiring welath so that a person can do whatever makes him or her feel good
    D. it emphasized having an overall good life
    A. conflicts between virtues or sets of virtues held by different peopel or communities cannot be resolved by appealing to a virtue
    (this multiple choice question has been scrambled)
  71. T or F

    Contemporary philosopher Alasdair MacIntryre argues that modern ethics has forgotten moral virtue
    True
  72. T or F

    Aristotle rejects the idea that a virtue is the ability to be reasonable in our actions, desires, and emotions
    False
  73. T or F

    According to Aristotle, virtue is never easy and pleasant
    False
  74. T or F

    Carol Gilligan argues that men and women approach ethics in exactly the same way
    False
  75. T or F

    For philosopher Nel Noddings, the "feminine" virtue of caring is more fundamental than the "masculine" focus on principles
    True
  76. The Social contract theory holds that the power of the state is based upon

    A. the power of a conquering army
    B. consent of the people
    C. religious customs and beliefs
    D. a communicty's cultural values and traditions
    B. consent of the people
    (this multiple choice question has been scrambled)
  77. Thomas Hobbes believed that the best form of government was one that

    A. exercised absolute powers
    B. remained neutral
    C. exercised limited powers
    D. allowed people to be in a state of nature
    A. exercised absolute powers
    (this multiple choice question has been scrambled)
  78. John Locke argued that in a state of nature

    A. people will "seek out and... join in society with others"
    B. people lived under a "veil of ignorance"
    C. life was "solitary, poor, nasty, brutish, and short"
    D. the very idea of government is "far beyond the comprhension of savages"
    A. people will "seek out and... join in society with others"
    (this multiple choice question has been scrambled)
  79. Who said "The greatest and chief end of men unititng int ocommonwealths, and putting themselves under government, is the preservation of their property"?

    A. David Hume
    B. Thomas Jefferson
    C. THomas Hobbes
    D. John Locke
    D. John Locke
    (this multiple choice question has been scrambled)
  80. In his book, A Theory of Justice, philosopher JOhn Rawls describes an imaginary thought experiment "characterized so as to lead to a certain conception of justice." Which two principles of justice did Rawls think people would agree to?

    A. social and economic inequalitities are just only if they result in compensating benefits for everyone, and in particular for the least advataged members of society
    B. equality in the assignment of rights according to an individual's merits
    C. both a and c
    D. equality in the assignment of basic rights and duties
    C. both a and c
    (this multiple choice question has been scrambled)
  81. Many communitarians have criticized Rawls' social contract theory because it

    A. fosters social inequalities
    B.undervalues and individual's rights
    C. ignores the vital importance of a community's cultureal traditions
    D. encourages governmnets to protect cultural values and traditions
    C. ignores the vital importance of a community's cultureal traditions
    (this multiple choice question has been scrambled)
  82. The idea that a person becomes actualized by subjecting personal interests to the larger common good of the State, thereby obtaining true freedom, was articulated by

    A. Georg Hegel
    B. Thomas Jefferson
    C. John Locke
    D. Karl Marx
    A. Georg Hegel
    (this multiple choice question has been scrambled)
  83. The challenge to communitariansim that "individuals have rights and thesear e trumps over the social good", was expressed by whom?

    A. Ronald Dworkin
    B. Charles Taylor
    C. Michael Sandel
    D. John Rawls
    A. Ronald Dworkin
    (this multiple choice question has been scrambled)
  84. when individuals rights conflict with community values,the rights of individuals take priority

    a. liberalism
    b. communitarianism
    a. liberalism
  85. a society should be engineered so that people are free to do what they want, even when the majority thinks the lives they are creating for themselves are bad lives

    a. liberalism
    b. communitarianism
    a. liberalism
  86. without a larger community, political and cultural life cannot flourish

    a. liberalism
    b. communitarianism
    b. communitarianism
  87. the state must remain neutral and allow individuals to choose their own values and ends

    a. liberalism
    b. communitarianism
    a. liberalism
  88. individuals have no social context outside the State

    a. liberalism
    b. communitarianism
    b. communitarianism
  89. a requirement of human flourishing is engagement in public life

    a. liberalism
    b. communitarianism
    b. communitarianism
  90. T or F

    In Leviathan, Hobbes portrays humans as selfish, unsocial creatures driven by two needs: survival and personal gain
    True
  91. T or F

    For Rousseau, a group of wills is general when each member of the group aims at their own particular interests
    False
  92. T or F

    For Rawls government is not justified when it is the kind of govt that we would choose in the original position
    False
  93. T or F

    Both Aristotle and Hegel argue that humans cannot develop fully unless they live in the state and that the state is more important than the individual citizen
    True
  94. T or F

    Feminists object that Hobbes, Locke, and Rousseau do nto apply to women the idea that authority requires consent and that they assume only males enter the social contract
    True
  95. Social Philosophy
    the philosophical study of society including the study of the application of moral principles to the problems of society, an the study of the nature of freedom, equality, justice, political obligation, and the state
  96. Contract Theory
    the doctrine that individuals give up certain liberties and rights to the state, which in turn guarantees such rights as life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness
  97. According to Aristotle, justice is distributed in society

    A. equally
    B. according to one's social status
    C. according to an individual's merit
    D. to males only
    C. according to an individual's merit
    (this multiple choice question has been scrambled)
  98. Karl Marx's ideas of social jsutice drew on the ideas of

    A. Plato
    B. John Rawls
    C. Aristotle
    D. Friedrich Engels
    C. Aristotle
    (this multiple choice question has been scrambled)
  99. Karl Marx based his analysis of capitalism on his study of

    a. Aristotle's Ethics
    b. governmental regulatory agencies
    c. labor unions
    d. economic growth
    d. economic growth
  100. John Rawl's theory of social justice argues that all members of a society are equal based upon their

    A. social status
    B. moral status as individuals
    C. personal merits
    D. religious convictions
    B. moral status as individuals
    (this multiple choice question has been scrambled)
  101. According to Rawls' theory of social justice, inequality can be reconciled with social justice by means of

    A. a distribution of social resources through welfare programs
    B. elimination of taxes on private property
    C. voluntary charitable organizations
    D. higher taxes
    A. a distribution of social resources through welfare programs
    (this multiple choice question has been scrambled)
  102. The ideas of Robert Nozick call for

    A. the redistribution of wealth through fair taxation policies
    B. social welfare programs to helpt he disadvataged compete in capitalist economics
    C. the elimination of taxation for the purposes of redistributing social resources
    D. the dismantlement of govts that tax citizens
    C. the elimination of taxation for the purposes of redistributing social
    (this multiple choice question has been scrambled)
  103. Empowerment is a type of economic aid that does NOT include

    A. job training programs
    B. small business loans
    C. direct monetary relief
    D. education programs
    C. direct monetary relief
    (this multiple choice question has been scrambled)
  104. Large disparities in wealth can be harmful to societies that valeu a commonwealth, is a view held by

    a. Aristotle
    b. Karl Marx
    c. Micahel Sandel
    d. none of the above
    e. all of the above
    e. all of the above
  105. T or F

    For Plate and Aristotle justice means that each should act and be treated according to his or her abilities,achievements, and social status
    True
  106. T or F

    Strict egalitarians reject the view that every person should be given exactly equal shares of society's benefits and burdens
    False
  107. T or F

    Mill argued that a just society is one that distributes benefits and burdens in whatever way will produce the greatest social benefits or the lowest social harms
    True
  108. T or F

    In A Theory of Justice, Rawls advocated "From each according to his ability, to each according to his need."
    False
  109. T or F

    Robert Nozick argues that justice is respecting people's free choices
    True
  110. The idea that man has no purpose is central to the ideas of

    a. Karl Marx
    b. G.W.F Hegel
    c. Soren Kierkegaard
    d. Charles Darwin
  111. The idea that human history is progressing toward a goal of fuller acheivement of human freedom and reason is central to the philosophy of

    A. Karl Marx
    B. Charles Darwin
    C. Jean-Paul Sartre
    D. G.W.F Hegel
    D. G.W.F Hegel
    (this multiple choice question has been scrambled)
  112. The ideas of Karl Marx are best described as

    A. existentialist
    B. Aristotelian
    C. Hegelian
    D. Darwinism
    C. Hegelian
    (this multiple choice question has been scrambled)
  113. The view that meaning in life can be found in ourselves and our inner choices is associated with which philosopher?

    A. Soren Kierkegaard
    B. Jean-Paul Sartre
    C. G.W.F. Hegel
    D. Simone de Beauvoir
    A. Soren Kierkegaard
    (this multiple choice question has been scrambled)
  114. WHat state of mind did the philosopher Soren Kierkegaard regard as modern man's symptom of the awareness that the meaning of life cannot be found in external sources?

    A. apathy
    B. anguish
    C. misery
    D. happiness
    B. anguish
    (this multiple choice question has been scrambled)
  115. Which existentialist philosopher describes 3 stages through which a seeker of meaning in life passes?

    A. Simone de Beauvoir
    B. Jean-Paul Sartre
    C. Soren Kierkegaard
    D. Martin Heidegger
    C. Soren Kierkegaard
    (this multiple choice question has been scrambled)
  116. Which statement best summarizes the stand taken by Danish philosopher Soren Kierkegaard on the existence of God and man's purpose in life?

    A. man must create God by his own choice in order to know the meaning and purpose of life
    B. God has devised a plan within which man's purpose lies
    C. man must put his faith in God's purpose for man
    D. God does not exist and man has to find his own purpose in life
    A. man must create God by his own choice in order to know the meaning and purpose of life
    (this multiple choice question has been scrambled)
  117. The French philosopher Jean-Paul Sartre shares with Soren Kierkegaard the idea that

    A. meaning in life is based upon our free choices and communication
    B. the seeker fro meaning of life passes through aesthetic, ethical, and moral stages
    C.we must entrust ourselves in a "leap of faith" to a higher power
    D. human beings are condemned to be free
    A. meaning in life is based upon our free choices and communication
    (this multiple choice question has been scrambled)
  118. According to Jean-Paul Sartre, to live in "bad faith" is to

    A. refuse the anguish that goes along with meaning that one chooses in life
    B. accept the consequences of the choices one makes in life
    C. choose a conventional path in life
    D. choose a religious path in life
    A. refuse the anguish that goes along with meaning that one chooses in life
    (this multiple choice question has been scrambled)
  119. The French philosopher SImone de Beauvoir focuse her writings on which central idea of existentialism?

    A. that human beings are condemned to be free
    B. that the individual has no essential nature
    C. that human beings must accept the anguish that accompanies freedom
    D. that he individual must freely choose values and meanings in life
    B. that the individual has no essential nature
    (this multiple choice question has been scrambled)
  120. T or F

    For Albert Camus, "the meaning of life is the most urgent of questions"
    True
  121. T or F

    One theistic response to the meaing of life claims that human life has meaning becuase humans are part of a larger plan or order devised by God
    True
  122. T or F

    Karl Marx wrote that "the history of the world is none other than the progress of the consciousness of freedom"
    False
  123. T or F

    According to the nihilist, the end of the world is nigh.
    False
  124. T or F

    For Kierkegaard,the move to the religious stage is a commitment not to a rational principle but to a relationship with a person
    True

What would you like to do?

Home > Flashcards > Print Preview