Literature -MAT

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hope0827
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84125
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Literature -MAT
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2011-05-06 19:49:04
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MAT literature
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mat literature
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  1. Aeschylus
    • Greek drama; 2nd speaking character; concept of conflict
    • Oresteia/Agamemnon/Chophori/Eumenides
  2. Aristophanes
    • father of Greek comedy;
    • Lysistrata/The Clouds/The Birds
  3. Aristotle
    • Concept of criticism
    • The Poetics
  4. Euripides
    • technique of deus ex machina
    • The Trojan Women/Helen/The Bacchae
  5. Homer
    • non literate culture; 1st works of Western Lit
    • Odyssey/Illiad
  6. Ovid
    • Publius Ovidius Naso
    • erotic verse
    • Metamorphoses/Love's Remedy
  7. Plato
    • father of Western Philosophy
    • Republic/Apology/Symposium
  8. Sappho
    verse fragments; early Greek poetry
  9. Sophocles
    • 3rd speaking character; Greek drama from religious commentary->basic human interaction
    • Oedipus/Tyrannus/Antigone/Electra
  10. Virgil
    • Publius Vegilius Maro
    • pastoral poem; concept of civic virtue
    • The Aeneid
  11. Francis Bacon
    • founder of inductive method of modern science; philosophical writings
    • Essays/The New Atlantis
    • Middle Ages/Renaissance
  12. Giovannie Boccaccio
    • vernacular in classically focused lit
    • The Decameron
    • Middle Ages/Renaissance
  13. Geoffrey Chaucer
    • brought lit ->middle class
    • The Canterbury Tales/Troilus and Criseyde
    • Middle Ages/Renaissance
  14. Miguel de Cervantes
    • 1st modern novel
    • Don Quixote
    • Middle Ages/Renaissance
  15. Ben Jonson
    • English playwright
    • Every Man in His Humour
    • Middle Ages/Renaissance
  16. Nicolo Machiavelli
    • self interest ruler=Machiavellian government(The Prince)
    • The Prince/La Madrigola
    • Middle Ages/Renaissance
  17. Christopher Marlowe
    • 1st historical drama and English tragedy
    • The Tragedy of Doctor Faustus/Edward the Second
    • Middle Ages/Renaissance
  18. John Milton
    • Puritan poet; allegorical religious epics
    • Paradise Lost/Paradise Regained
    • Middle Ages/Renaissance
  19. Francesco Petrarch
    • love poetry;popularized humanism theme
    • The Canzoniere
    • Middle Ages/Renaissance
  20. Francois Rabelais
    • Satiric narrative
    • Gargantua/Pantagruel
    • Middle Ages/Renaissance
  21. William Shakespeare
    • greatest English poet and dramatist
    • Hamlet/King Lear/Macbeth/Romeo Juliet/Twelfth Night/Richard III/Julius Caesar/Much Ado About Nothing/Sonnets
    • Middle Ages/Renaissance
  22. Edmund Spenser
    • popularized use of allegory
    • The Faerie Queen/Amoretti
    • Middle Ages/Renaissance
  23. John Dryden
    • heroic couplet
    • Alexander's Feast/Heroic Stanzas
    • Neoclassical Period
  24. Jean-Baptiste Poquelin
    Moliere
    • literary convo and intro everyday speech to theatre
    • Don Juan/Tartuffe/The Misanthrope
    • Neoclassical Period
  25. Jean Racine
    • lyric poetry based on Greek/Roman lit
    • Andromaque/Bernice and Phaedre
    • Neoclassical Period
  26. Joseph Addison
    • poet, critic, and playwright; essays marked political free thinking of his time
    • The Tattler/The Spectator/Cato
    • The Enlightenment
  27. William Blake
    • visual artist/poet; defied neoclassical convention c/ subjects of truth and beauty
    • Songs of Innocence/Songs of Experience
    • The Enlightenment
  28. Benjamin Franklin
    • Scientist, educator, abolitionist, philosopher, economist, political theorist, and statesman; defined the colonial New world; American Enlightenment
    • Poor Richard's Almanac/Observations on the Increase of Mankind/numerous essays and state papers
    • The Enlightenment
  29. Alexander Pope
    • Classicist; formulated rules for poetry; satirized British social circles
    • The Dunciad/The Rape of the Lock
    • The Enlightenment
  30. Jean-Jacques Rousseau
    • Libertine; prose inspired the French Revolution
    • Social Contract/The New Heloise
    • The Enlightenment
  31. Jonathan Swift
    • direct style; clear sharp prose; critical wit
    • Gulliver's Travels/Tale of a Tub
    • The Enlightenment
  32. Francois-Marie Arouet
    Voltaire
    • Progressive philosopher/freethinker; synthesized French and English critical theory
    • Candide/Zadig
    • The Enlightenment
  33. Jane Austen
    • manners and middle class English society novels
    • Sense and Sensibility/Pride and Prejudice
    • Romantic, Victorian, and Realists
  34. Charles Baudelaire
    • French Symbolist poet
    • Flowers of Evil(Les Fleurs du Mal)
    • Romantic, Victorian, and Realists
  35. Charlotte Bronte
    • Victorian novelist; sister to Emily Bronte
    • Jane Eyre
    • Romantic, Victorian, and Realists
  36. Emily Bronte
    • Victorian novelist
    • Wuthering Heights
    • Romantic, Victorian, and Realists
  37. Elizabeth Barrett Browning
    • English poet; married to Robert Browning
    • Sonnets from the Portuguese/Aurora Leigh
    • Romantic, Victorian, and Realists
  38. Robert Browning
    • English poet; married to Elizabeth Browning
    • Bells and Pomegranates
    • Romantic, Victorian, and Realists
  39. George Gordon (Lord) Byron
    • major Romantic movement figure; inspired Byronic hero
    • Don Juan/classic poetry
    • Romantic, Victorian, and Realists
  40. Samuel Taylor Coleridge
    • lit critic of Romantic period
    • Rime of the Ancient Mariner
    • Romantic, Victorian, and Realists
  41. Joseph Conrad
    • born-Ukraine to Polish parents; English post colonialist novelist
    • Heart of Darkness/Lord Jim
    • Romantic, Victorian, and Realists
  42. Charles Dickens
    • English novelist
    • Great Expectations/Oliver Twist
  43. Emily Dickinson
    • American poet;
    • Because I Could Not Stop for Death
    • Romantic, Victorian, and Realists
  44. Fyodor Dostoyevsky
    • Russian novelist
    • Crime and Punishment/Notes From the Underground
    • Romantic, Victorian, and Realists
  45. George Eliot
    • English author
    • Mill on the Floss
    • Romantic, Victorian, and Realists
  46. Gustave Flaubert
    • French novelist
    • Madame Bovary
    • Romantic, Victorian, and Realists
  47. Nathaniel Hawthorne
    • American transcendentalist
    • The Scarlet Letter/House of the Seven Gables
    • Romantic, Victorian, and Realists
  48. Henrik Ibsen
    • Norwegian playwright; Expressionist movement
    • Romantic, Victorian, and Realists
  49. Franz Kafka
    • existentialist novelist
    • The Metamorphosis/The Castle
    • Romantic, Victorian, and Realists
  50. John Keats
    • most versatile of the Romantics
    • Hyperion/On a Grecian Urn
    • Romantic, Victorian, and Realists
  51. D. H. Lawrence
    • English novelist
    • Lady Chatterly's Lover/The Rainbow
    • Romantic, Victorian, and Realists
  52. Herman Melville
    • American transcendentalist
    • Moby-Dick/Billy Budd
    • Romantic, Victorian, and Realists
  53. Edgar Allan Poe
    • American transcendentalist; macabre issues of insanity and horror
    • Fall of the House of Usher/The Tell-Tale Heart/The Raven
    • Romantic, Victorian, and Realists
  54. Christina Rosetti
    • English poet
    • Goblin Market
    • Romantic, Victorian, and Realists
  55. Mary Shelley
    • Romantic novelist; liberal social/political views underscored her work; sister to Percy Shelley
    • Frankenstein/The Last Man
    • Romantic, Victorian, and Realists
  56. Percy Bysshe Shelley
    • Romantic poet;mastered metaphor and metrical form; brother to Mary Shelley
    • Adonais
    • Romantic, Victorian, and Realists
  57. Harriet Beecher Stowe
    • American novelist; most important novel of abolitionist movement
    • Uncle Tom's Cabin
    • Romantic, Victorian, and Realists
  58. Henry David Thoreau
    • American transcendentalist and social theorist
    • Walden
    • Romantic, Victorian, and Realists
  59. Leo Nilolayevich Tolstoy
    • Russian novelist
    • War and Peace/Anna Karenina
    • Romantic, Victorian, and Realists
  60. Mark Twain
    (Samuel Clemens)
    • American novelist; essayist; satirist
    • Huckleberry Finn/ Tom Sawyer
    • Romantic, Victorian, and Realists
  61. Walt Whitman
    • American poet
    • Leaves of Grass
    • Romantic, Victorian, and Realists
  62. Oscar Wilde
    • English novelist; dramatist; social critic
    • The Importance of Being Earnest/Picture of Dorian Gray
    • Romantic, Victorian, and Realists
  63. William Wordsworth
    • Romantic poet; broke neoclassical theory; nature poetry
    • The Prelude/Lyrical Ballads
    • Romantic, Victorian, and Realists
  64. Dante Alighieri
    • founded modern European lit; terza-rima
    • Divine Comedy/The Inferno/Purgatorio/Paradiso
    • The Middle Ages and Renaissance
  65. James Baldwin
    • American poet and novelist
    • The Fire Next Time
    • Modernism and Post-Modernism
  66. Samuel Beckett
    • Irish-born; French playwright and novelist; existentialism and absurdity themes
    • Waiting for Godot/Happy Days
    • Modernism and Post-Modernism
  67. Elizabeth Bishop
    • American poet
    • Collected Works
    • Modernism and Post-Modernism
  68. e. e. Cummings
    • non-traditional forms of poetry
    • Tulips and Chimneys
    • Modernism and Post-Modernism
  69. T. S. Eliot
    • Christian poet and theorist
    • The Waste Land
    • Modernism and Post-Modernism
  70. William Faulkner
    • author of American South
    • The Sound and the Fury/Absalom! Absalom!
    • Modernism and Post-Modernism
  71. Robert Frost
    • American poet
    • Birches/The Road Not Taken
    • Modernism and Post-Modernism
  72. Allen Ginsberg
    • American Beat poet
    • Howl
    • Modernism and Post-Modernism
  73. Nadine Gordimer
    • South African novelist
    • A Sport of Nature
    • Modernism and Post-Modernism
  74. Ernest Hemingway
    • lean prose; ardently masculine themes and characters
    • The Old Man and the Sea/A Farewell to Arms
    • Modernism and Post-Modernism
  75. Langston Hughes
    • Harlem Renaissance poet
    • Collected Works
    • Modernism and Post-Modernism
  76. Zora Neale Hurston
    • American novelist and folklorist; Their Eyes Were Watching God/Tell My Horse
    • Modernism and Post-Modernism
  77. James Joyce
    • Modernist; novelist of Ireland; stream of conscious and non linear narratives
    • Portrait of an Artist as a Young Man/Ulysses
    • Modernism and Post-Modernism
  78. Jack Kerouac
    • American Beat poet and novelist
    • On the Road/Dharma Bums
    • Modernism and Post-Modernism
  79. Harper Lee
    • American writer
    • To Kill a Mockingbird (only novel)
    • Modernism and Post-Modernism
  80. Sinclair Lewis
    • American novelist and social critic
    • Babbitt/Elmer/Gantry
    • Modernism and Post-Modernism
  81. Arthur Miller
    • American playwright
    • Death of a Salesman/The Crucible
    • Modernism and Post-Modernism
  82. Henry Miller
    • Controversial American novelist
    • The Tropic of Cancer/The Tropic of Capricorn
    • Modernism and Post-Modernism
  83. Toni Morrison
    • American novelist
    • The Bluest Eye/Song of Solomon/Beloved
    • Modernism and Post-Modernism
  84. Vladimir Nabokov
    • Russian novelist
    • Lolita/Invitation to a Beheading
    • Modernism and Post-Modernism
  85. V.S. Naipaul
    • Post Colonialist novelist; born in Trinidad of Indian parents; raised in England
    • Enigma of Arrival/House for Mr. Biswas
    • Modernism and Post-Modernism

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