The Writings VLI Intensive Lecture One

Card Set Information

Author:
crunchybunnies27
ID:
84480
Filename:
The Writings VLI Intensive Lecture One
Updated:
2011-05-08 03:23:27
Tags:
VLI JBI
Folders:

Description:
The Writings VLI Intensive Lecture One
Show Answers:

Home > Flashcards > Print Preview

The flashcards below were created by user crunchybunnies27 on FreezingBlue Flashcards. What would you like to do?


  1. What is this describing? God is King, reigning in high-heaven over the universe. Angels, Principalities, Powers, Satan, and demons operate and battle in mid-heaven (Daniel 10), between high-heaven and earth. Earth is the zone where humans lie and engage in the battles of high- and mid- heaven.
    The biblical “warfare worldview”
  2. What is this describing? Gregory Boyd writes, “…the Bible from beginning to end presupposes spiritual beings who exist ‘between’ humanity and God and whose behavior significantly affects human existence for better or or worse. Indeed, just such a conception…lies at the center of the biblical worldview...From a cross cultural perspective, the insight that the cosmos is teeming with spiritual beings whose behavior can and does benefit and or harm us is simply common sense. It is we modern Westerners who are the oddballs for thinking that the only free agents who influence other people and things are humans” (Boyd, God at War [1997], p. 11)
    The biblical “warfare worldview”
  3. What is this describing? “Stated most broadly, this worldview is that perspective on reality which centers on the conviction that the good and evil, fortunate or unfortunate, aspects of life are to be interpreted largely as the result of good and evil, friendly or hostile spirits warring against each other and against us” (p. 13). “I do suggest that biblical authors generally understood all evil in the context of spiritual war…For biblical authors, to wage war against such things as injustice, oppression, greed and apathy toward the needy was to participate directly or indirectly in a cosmic war that had engulfed the earth” (p. 13f.)
    The biblical “warfare worldview”
  4. What is this describing? “The world is a spiritual battle zone, which is why it looks that way!” (p. 17). “…God’s good creation has in fact been seized by hostile, evil, cosmic forces that are seeking to destroy God’s beneficent plan for the cosmos. God wages war against these forces, however, and through the power of Jesus Christ has now secured the overthrow of this evil cosmic army” (p.19).
    The biblical “warfare worldview”
  5. What is this describing? “As an increasing number of New Testament scholars now recognize, almost everything that Jesus and the early church were about is decisively colored by the central conviction that the world is caught in the crossfire of a cosmic battle between the Lord and his angelic army and Satan and his demonic army” (p. 172). “Jesus’ teaching, his exorcisms, his healings and other miracles, as well as his work on the cross, all remain somewhat incoherent and unrelated to one another until we interpret them within this apocalyptic context [the ultimate battle between God and Satan; good and evil spirits]: in other words, until we interpret them as acts of war” (p. 180). “For Jesus, the kingdom of God means abolishing the kingdom of Satan. As Kallas argues, ‘This world [in Jesus’ view] was a demon-infested world in need of liberation, and the advance of God’s sovereignty was in direct proportion to the rout of the demons… Exorcisms of demons was the central thrust of the message and activity of Jesus.’ So too, Gustaf Wingrin writes, ‘When Jesus heals the sick and drives out evil spirits, Satan’s dominion is departing and God’s kingdom is coming’ (Mt. 12:22- 29). The ‘kingdom of God,’ as Jesus uses the term, refers to nothing other than his ministry and the ministry he gave to his disciples, of setting up God’s rule where previously there had been Satan’s rule” (p. 185). “For Jesus, healings and exorcisms clearly did not merely symbolize the kingdom of God – they were the kingdom of God. They were not the products of the message he proclaimed – they were the message. Warring against Satan and building the kingdom of God were, for Jesus, one and the same activity” (p. 186). “Whatever else the rule of God is about, it is about vanquishing the rule of Satan, and thus about setting people free from demons and from the ungodly infirmities they inflict on people” (p. 187). The evangelization of the ancient world centered on “power encounters” answering the question: “Whose God is greater?” As the Christians cast out demons in the name of Jesus, he was magnified as Lord over these evil spirits masked behind the pagan gods. (See Ramsay MacMulllen, Christianizing the Roman Empire AD 100-400 (1984).
    The biblical “warfare worldview”
  6. What is this describing? Wisdom literature must be seen in the context of the Kingdom and its Exodus theme, which is the theme of the Old Testament. Thus Job’s sufferings are the result of Satan’s attack on his circumstances and himself. His bondage to loss and suffering is reversed at the end of his ordeal by God’s self-revelation to him. The book concludes with his being blessed: “After this, Job lived a hundred and forty years; he saw his children and their children to the fourth generation. And so he died, old and full of years” (Job 42:16-17). Ecclesiastes meditates on the vanity of this world which threatens to seduce us into substituting this life and its pleasures, its cycles and accomplishments, for the true God whom we are to obey and worship alone: “Now all has been heard; here is the conclusion of the matter: Fear God and keep his commandments, for this is the whole duty of man. For God will bring every deed into judgment, including every hidden thing, whether good or evil” (Eccles. 12:13-14).
    The context of biblical “warfare worldview” in Old Testament Wisdom Literature
  7. What is this describing? Psalms reveals God’s kingly rule in opposition to all his (and our) enemies and shows us that our destiny is to worship him. We are not to be seduced by the world, its idols or our enemies. God, the great King, will go into battle on our behalf. “The Lord is my light and my salvation – whom shall I fear? The Lord is the stronghold of my life – of whom shall I be afraid? When evil men advance against me to devour my flesh, when my enemies and my foes attack me, they will stumble and fall” (Psalm 27:1-2)
    The context of biblical “warfare worldview” in Old Testament Wisdom Literature
  8. What is this describing? Proverbs shows us that God is King. Fearing him is the beginning of wisdom or knowledge (Proverbs 1:7). He is our Judge: “A good man obtains favor from the Lord, but the Lord condemns a crafty man” (12:2) All of life is sanctified by him and to be lived before him. “The Lord detests men of perverse heart but he delights in those whose ways are blameless” (11:20)
    The context of biblical “warfare worldview” in Old Testament Wisdom Literature
  9. What is this describing? “Put succinctly, the classical-philosophical assumption that a mysterious, loving ,sovereign divine plan lies behind even evil events in our world encourages an approach to evil that defines it as an intellectual problem to be solved rather than a spiritual opponent to be overcome”
    The biblical “warfare worldview”
  10. What is this describing? It’s a _____ of mind and experience (thus, a goal of the elders is to attain this__) It distinguishes the wise person, making him or her able to live well, succeed, and counsel others for success.
    One of the qualities of wisdom
  11. What is this describing? It’s a ___ of itself, coming from God, who is all-wise. Within the unity of God (monotheism) the is diversity. Old Testament monotheism reveals the complexity of the divine being (His Spirit, His Word, etc.) God’s wisdom pre-exists creation.
    One of the qualities of wisdom
  12. What is this describing? It’s a _____ of order. It imparts form to creation. Creation is the product of perfect ______ and will therefore be, in principle intelligible. Biblical faith, in contrast with the pagan world, de-mystifies nature, giving it divine order (and making modern science possible). Proverbs 3:19, Job 38:33, 36
    One of the qualities of wisdom
  13. What is this concluding? What is implied here is a single system a universe, given coherence by the one true God- rather than an unstable world that is the product of rival wills (gods)- subject to arbitrary pressures of magico-religious manipulation like that in the Ancient Near Eastern myths.
    How the qualities of wisdom provide an argument against paganism
  14. What is this describing? ______ is revelation (“general revelation,” “providence”) applied to life in this world. It’s validated through the mediation of experience and observations, of cause and effect patterns. It combines revelation (faith) and reason. That is, we receive it from God and it makes sense to us. (Compare Proverbs).
    How wisdom is derived
  15. What is this describing? _____ is a means of revelation through observation, experience, and deliberation over time. Things that go in the world have some direct relationship to God and his purpose. Again, he is both the Creator and Redeemer.
    How wisdom is derived
  16. What is this describing? ______ from common experience has limits; the wise person knows this. You can watch and learn, but the light (truth and insight) is from the Lord. “Trust in the Lord with all your heart and lean not on your own understanding...” Prov 3:5-7
    How wisdom is derived
  17. What is this describing? ____ shows us that the God’s Kingdom-rule is both personal and practical. God reigns over the details of our lives. He confronts and answers our human questions and observations, ultimately with himself. “My ears had heard of you but now my eyes have seen you. Therefore I despise myself and repent in dust and ashes.” Job 42:5-6
    How wisdom is derived
  18. What is this describing? Through the tribe, clan, or extended family. It prepares each generation to assume the responsibilities of carrying the culture to the next generation. The tribe, clan, and extended family pass on ____ regarding identity, faith, family, land, social leadership, etc.
    One of the 3 ways wisdom is transmitted
  19. What is this describing? Through Parents. Mothers and fathers are the child’s earliest instructors in the customs, moral standards, and traditions of a family and tribal-based society.
    One of the 3 ways wisdom is transmitted
  20. What is this describing? Through Oral tradition. Historically, most people in the Ancient World were illiterate (80% of Roman Empire couldn’t read or write. Education was basically oral and required a sharp memory. This also explains why Proverbs is written in a form easily remembered.
    One of the 3 ways wisdom is transmitted
  21. What is this describing? His “wisdom was greater than the wisdom of all the men of the East, and greater than all the wisdom of Egypt. He was wiser than any other man, including Ethan the Ezrahite- wiser than Herman, Calcol and Darda, the sons of Mahol; and his fame spread to all the surrounding nations.” 1 Kings 4:30-31)
    Solomon’s unique role in the development of wisdom literature
  22. What is this describing? He incorporated wisdom into his court, teaching it and giving it its proper royal place. “God gave (him) wisdom and very great insight, and a breadth of understanding as measureless as the sand on the seashore...”
    Solomon’s unique role in the development of wisdom literature
  23. What is this describing? He became the patriarch of wisdom in Israel (Proverbs 1:1; 10:1; 25:11)
    Solomon’s unique role in the development of wisdom literature
  24. What is this describing? It is applicable to all societies, not just Israel. Proverbs from one society can be borrowed easily by another because their character (as observations based on reflections upon life) gives them a universality (and timelessness) not often found in epic or historical writing.
    On of the four characteristics of biblical wisdom literature
  25. What is this describing? It emphasizes the success or well-being of the individual. This happens in a corporate of tribal culture.
    On of the four characteristics of biblical wisdom literature
  26. What is this describing? Is is A-historical. Almost no reference to Israel’s history can be found in biblical wisdom literature, which gives wisdom a universal appeal. In the non-canonical Wisdom of Solomon, historical events are de-historicized (chp 10ff).
    On of the four characteristics of biblical wisdom literature
  27. What is this describing? It is distinctive, in stating that all wisdom comes from God. Israel’s faith is heard in Job, Proverbs, and Ecclesiastes. For the Israelites all wisdom comes from God and begins with the knowledge and fear of God as well as in obedience to God. God’s character is epressed in the wisdom and there’s a divinely embodied morality. Wise men referenced the divine order in creation that God used in governing life –rewarding sound judgment and behavior and inflicting harmful consequences on foolishness.
    On of the four characteristics of biblical wisdom literature
  28. Recognize the following aspects of both conventional and critical wisdom: content, format, Kingdom
    • Theology, conclusions and example(s). (Sect. 10)
    • See the chart in section 10 which is on page 10 in the Intensive notes

What would you like to do?

Home > Flashcards > Print Preview