Cognitive Archaeology, Art, and Religion - Flashcards

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Cognitive Archaeology, Art, and Religion - Flashcards
2011-05-18 16:36:39

From Archaeology: Theories, Methods and Practice (4th edition), 2006, Renfrew and Bahn, Thames & Hudson
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  1. Cognitive archaeology
    The study of past ways of thought and symbolic structures from material remains.

    (Chapter 10 p. 391)
  2. Cognitive map
    An interpretive framework of the world which, it is argued, exists in the human mind and affects actions and decisions as well as knowledge structures.

    (Chapter 10 p. 392)
  3. Parietal art
    A term used to designate art on the walls of caves and shelters, or on huge blocks.

    (Chapter 10 p. 396)
  4. Mobiliary art
    A term used for the portable art of the Ice Age, comprising engravings and carvings on small objects of stone, antler, bone, and ivory.

    (Chapter 10 p. 397)
  5. Archaeology of cult
    The study of the material indications of patterned actions undertaken in response to religious beliefs.

    (Chapter 10 p. 412)
  6. Cenote
    A ritual well, for example at the late Maya site of Chich n Itz, into which enormous quantities of symbolically rich goods had been deposited.

    (Chapter 10 p. 415)
  7. Iconography
    An important component of cognitive archaeology , this involves the study of artistic representations which usually have an overt religious or ceremonial significance.

    (Chapter 10 p. 415)
  8. Symmetry Analysis
    A mathematical approach to the analysis of decorative style which divides patterns into "symmetry classes": 17 classes for those patterns that repeat motifs horizontally, 46 classes for those that repeat them horizontally and vertically.

    (Chapter 10 p. 419)
  9. Style
    According to the art historian, Ernst Gombrich, style is "any distinctive and therefore recognizable way in which an act is performed and made." Archaeologists and anthropologists have defined "stylistic areas" as areal units representing shared ways of producing and decorating artifacts.

    (Chapter 10 p. 419)