EZY D VAN W.txt

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EZY D VAN W.txt
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Easyjet interview prep van
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  1. What is the IATA Code for easyJet?
    U2
  2. What is the ICAO code for easyJet?
    EZY
  3. What is the callsign for easyJet flights?
    Easy
  4. What happens to the B737-700 aircraft in the easyJet fleet?
    Will be phased out by late 2011
  5. What are the five easyJet values?
    • 1. Saftey
    • 2. Teamwork
    • 3. Pioneering
    • 4. Passionate
    • 5. Integrity
  6. Where is the headquarter of easyJet based?
    Luton, England (hangar 89)
  7. In which hangar is easyJet's headquarter baseds?
    Hangar 89 in Luton
  8. When was easyJet founded?
    1995 by Sir Stelios Haji-Loannou
  9. Who founded easyJet?
    Sir Stelios Haji-Loannou
  10. Who is the current CEO of easyJet?
    Carolyn McCall
  11. Who is the COO of easyJet?
    Warwick Brady
  12. Who is the CFO of easyJet?
    Jeff Carr
  13. On which stock exchange is easyJet listed?
    The London Stock Exchange
  14. What was the first international destination for easyJet?
    Amsterdam in april 1996.
  15. What were the first two destinations flown by easyJet?
    Glasgow and Edinburgh from Luton.
  16. What are the three largest easyJet bases?
    London Gatwick, Milan Malpensa, London Luton
  17. What is the difference between Ryanair and easyJet?
    easyJet flies mainly to primary airports, while Ryanair flies to secundary airports.
  18. What aircraft does easyJet have in its fleet?
    A319-100, A320-200, B737-700 (will be phased out in 2011)
  19. WHat kind of engines does the Airbus have?
    CFM56-5B engines
  20. Why do the easyJet A319 ahve two pairs of overwing exits, instead of the standard one pair?
    Because a typical A319 carries 140 seats, easyJet configured the aircraft with smaller galleys, which allowd it to seat 156 seats.
  21. When was the first flight of the A320?
    22 february 1987
  22. What are advantages of fly-by-wire?
    Flight envelope protection, lower weight and cost, easier maintenance.
  23. What kind of engines does the Airbus have?
    Turbofan engines of CFM International (CFM56-5B)
  24. How is easyJet different from other carriers/LCC's?
    EasyJet flies mainly to primary airports, unline competitors who fly to secondary airports.
  25. What is easyJet's mission?
    To provide our customers with safe, good value, point-to-point air services.
  26. When did Carolyn McCall start as CEO of easyJet?
    March 24th 2010
  27. What is easyJet's largest base?
    London Gatwick
  28. What does EFIS mean?
    Electronic Flight Instrument System
  29. What does ECAM mean?
    Electronic Centralised Aircraft Monitor
  30. What does FADEC mean?
    Full Authority Digital Engine Control
  31. What are the 2 different types of drag?
    Parasite and induced drag
  32. Explain parasite drag:
    Parasite drag in independent of lift generation and is subdivided into: Skin friction drag, Form (pressure) drag, Interference drag. Parasite drag varies directly with the square of the IAS. Factors affecting parasite drag are: IAS, Configuration and Airframe contamination. Parasite drag varies directly in proportion to the frontal area presented to the airflow (flaps, gear etc..). Contamination by ice, snow, mud or slush will increase the parasite drag coefficient.
  33. Explain induced drag:
    Induced drag is the result of lift. Wingtip vortices modify upwash and downwash in the vicinity of the wing which produces a rearward component to the lift vector known as induced drag. The lower the IAS, the higher the AOA � the stronger the vortices, the greater the induced drag. Factors that affect induced drag are; the size of the lift force, the speed of the aircraft, the aspect ratio of the wing.
  34. Why do modern jet aircraft have such large all moving horizontal tailplanes?
    • - To provide a balancing force for large CG ranges (due to fuel consumption)
    • - To provide a balancing force for a large speed range
    • - To minimise the drag, since the aerofoil is more streamlined
    • - To cope with large trim changes as a result of position changes to the wing leading and trailing edge high lift devices.
    • - Trimming does not reduce the range of pitch control, as the elevator is approximately neutral when the aircraft is trimmed.
  35. Why are swept wings used?
    To increase Mcrit
  36. How does wing sweep increase Mcrit?
    Because a swept wing makes the velocity vector normal (perpendicular) to the leading edge a shorter distance than the chordwise resultant. Since the wing is responsive only to the velocity vector normal to the leading edge, the effective chordwise velocity is reduced. This means the airspeed can be raised before Mcrit is reached.
  37. What are advantages of swept back wings?
    High Mach cruise speeds and Stability in turbulence
  38. What are disadvantages of swept back wings?
    • Poor lift qualities
    • Higher stall speeds
    • Speed instability below Vmd
    • A wingtip stalling tendency
  39. What are slats/ slots?
    A slat is a auxillery aqerofoil attached to the leading edge of the wing. When deployed, the slat forms a slot which allows the passage of air from the high pressure region below the wing to the low pressure region above.
  40. Why use slats/ slots?
    Additional kinetic energy is added to the airflow. It reenergizes the boundary layer and thereby delaying boundary layer separation to a much higher AOA.
  41. What is Dutch Roll?
    Dutch roll is an oscillatory instability associated with swept wing jets. A combination of yawing & rolling.
  42. What causes Dutch Roll?
    When a yaw is induced the strong dihedral effect will role the aircraft due to the lift increase on the wing into wind. The increased induced drag on the rising wing will yaw the aircraft in the opposite direction, reversing the coupled oscillation.
  43. What is the function of a yaw damper?
    To counter Dutch Roll.
  44. How does a yaw damper work?
    This automatically displaces the rudder proportional to the rate of yaw to damp out the oscillations.
  45. What is Vmca?
    Vmca is the CAS, at which, directional control can be maintained in the air with the critical engine inoperative, with a maximum angle of bank of not more than 5 degrees.
  46. What is Vmcg?
    Vmcg is the CAS during the rake off run at which it is possible to maintain directional control on the ground, in the event of a failure of the critical engine, without the use of nose wheel steering (primary aerodynamic controls alone) to enable the take off to be safely continued using normal piloting skills.
  47. What is Mcrit?
    Mcrit is the free stream mach number at which the local velocity first reaches Mach 1 (sonic).
  48. Why is flying faster than Mcrit a problem?
    • - Increase in drag (because of airflow separation)
    • - Initial Mach buffer (caused by the shock waves on the upper surface of the wing)
    • - A nose down change in attitude (mach tuck)
  49. What is Mach Tuck?
    Mach tuck is the nose down pitching moment an aircraft experiences as it passes its critical Mach number (Mcrit). It is cause by the rearward movement of the center of pressure.
  50. How is Mach Tuck prevented?
    Mach tuck is prevented by a Mach trimmer. This is a device that corrects for Mach tuck by sensing the aircraft�s speed and signalling a proportional upward movement of the elevator or variable incidence stabalizer to maintain the aircraft�s pitch attitude.
  51. What is a vortex generator?
    A vortex generator is a small aerofoil which creates a vortex at its tip. This induces high energy air from the free stream flow to mix with the boundary layer.
  52. Why are vortex generators used?
    They are used to prevent spanwise flow and to maximize effectiveness of control surfaces (such as ailerons)
  53. Why would you have a vortex generator in front of the APU inlet?
    To improve high altitude starting of the APU by redicerting and reenergizing the airflow into the APU inlet.
  54. What happens if you move the throttle forward?
    Pitch up moment, because the thrust line is below the CG.
  55. Why would we have bleed valves on the engine
    • 1. To provide bleed air for auxilery systems
    • 2. To regulate the correct airflow pressures between different engine sections.
  56. What are the uses of bleed air?
    • - Airconditioning
    • - Anti icing
    • - Pressurisation
    • - Engine start
  57. What kind of engine does a Seneca have?
    A six cylinder, horizontally opposed, direct driven, Fuel injected, Air cooled, turbocharged, wet sump oil system, 200 Rated HP
  58. What is the difference between a 737/ a320
    • � The A320 is fly by wire
    • � A320 has a larger range (3300nm B737-8: 3115nm)
    • � A320 has a higher Mmo
    • � B737 had a lower gear, which means the engines are closer to the gorund; suspectable of ingestion of FOD.
  59. What navigation equipment does the Seneca have?
    VOR, DME, ADF, ILS, GPS
  60. What de-ice/ anti-ice equipment does the Seneca have?
    • Anti icing: Windscreen defroster
    • Heated lift detectors
    • Heated pitot head
    • De icing: Pneumatic de-icing boots on the wing, tailplane, fin
    • Windscreen de-icing fluid spray
    • Electro thermal propeller pads
  61. squawk code hijack & loss of comms
    hijack; 7500, comms failure; 7600, emergency; 7700
  62. Do you know the time and distance separation minima?
    • Heavy Heavy 4 -
    • Heavy Medium 5 2
    • Heavy Light 6 3
    • Medium Heavy 3 -
    • Medium Medium 3 -
    • Medium Light 5 3
  63. Relating to wake turbulence what is the separation distance required for a medium jet approaching/landing after another medium jet?
    3 nm's
  64. What is RVSM?
    It is the reduction of the standard vertical separation minima of 2000 ft between FL290 and FL410 to 1000 feet.
  65. If you don�t have enough track miles, how do you solve that problem
    request delaying trackmiles, request the amount of track miles needed, use speedbrake in the descent.
  66. What are the stages of a thunderstorm?
    • 1. Developing stage; Updrafts move air aloft, allowing condensation to take place throughout the ascent of the convective currents
    • 2. Mature stage; The most hazardous stage of a thunderstorm. The dangers include; torrential rain, hail, severe turbulence, severe icing, windshear, microbursts, lightning. Downdraughts and updraughts.
    • 3. Decaying stage; The final stage of a TS. Still windshear danger.
  67. How can you tell a thunderstorm is in its dissipating stage?
    No more continuous rain, but sporadic showers, sometimes as virga due to a temperature inversion beneath the cloud base, which can cause a marked windshear.
  68. What is the Dew Point?
    Dew point is the temperature at which a parcel of air becomes saturated .It�s capacity to hold water vapour is equal to that which it is actually holding. it�s relavtive humidity is 100%.
  69. Obviously fuel is a huge cost to an airline, how would you help use less fuel
    • 1. Take only the fuel needed
    • 2. Fly as much as possible at the optimum altitude
    • 3. Request for shortcuts/ shorter routing
    • 4. Careful planning
    • 5. Not too early/ not too late start configuration (flaps, gear etc..)
    • 6. Minimize the use of APU
  70. What is virga?
    Virga is rain that falls from the base of a cloud and evaporates at a lower altitude in drier warmer air before it reaches the ground. This is a sign of a temperature inversion, which in turn is an indication of possible windshear.
  71. What is the pressure in the hydraulic system?
    3000 PSI
  72. Difference between flap 30 and flap 40
    Flaps 40 will decrease the approach speed, and thereby decrease the landing run. Also better visibility because of the higher CL.
  73. What happens if you move throttle forward (pitch moment)
    Pitch up moment, because the thrust line is below the CG.
  74. Why would we have bleed valves on the engine
    • 1. To provide bleed air for auxilery systems
    • 2. To regulate the correct airflow pressures between different engine sections.
  75. List the uses of bleed air
    • � Pressurisation
    • � Air conditioning
    • � Engine and airframe anti icing
    • � Engine start
  76. From TAF/METAR �BR, GR and FU
    • -BR = Light mist
    • GR = Hail
    • FU = Fumes

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