PNP: Immunization

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Author:
MBitting
ID:
89730
Filename:
PNP: Immunization
Updated:
2011-06-07 21:11:50
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Immunizations children
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Description:
Immunizations in children
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  1. Immunizations at birth
    Hepatitis B
  2. Immunizations at 2 months
    • Hepatitis B #2 (Month 1 or 2)
    • Rota Virus #1 (no earlier than 6 weeks)
    • Diphtheria, Tetanus, Pertussis (no earlier than 6 weeks)
    • Haemophilus influenzae type b (no earlier than 6 weeks)
    • Pneumococcal vaccine (no earlier than 6 weeks)
    • Inactivated Poliovirus (no earlier than 6 weeks)
  3. Immunizations at 4 months
    • Rota Virus #2
    • Diphtheria, Tetanus, Pertussis #2
    • Haemophilus influenzae type b #2
    • Pneumococcal vaccine #2
    • Inactivated Poliovirus #2
  4. Immunizations at 6 months
    • Hepatitis #3 (No earlier than 24 weeks)
    • Rota Virus #2
    • Diphtheria, Tetanus, Pertussis #2
    • Haemophilus influenzae type b #2
    • Pneumococcal vaccine #2
    • Inactivated Poliovirus #2
  5. Infants born to mothers that are to mothers that are positive for Hep B need to be tested for Hep antibodies at what month?
    After having 3 doses of Hep B vaccine and at 9 - 18 months.
  6. The maximum dose for administering the Rota virus is
    Administer the first dose at age 6 through 14 weeks (maximum age: 14weeks 6 days). Vaccination should not be initiated for infants aged 15 weeks0 days or older.
  7. The maximum age for the final dose in the series is
    8 months
  8. DTaP is given when after the 3rd dose?
    6 months after the 3rd dose
  9. Immunizations given at 12 months are:
    • DTaP #4 (if it has been 6 months from #3)
    • Hib #4 (Hiberix should not be used for doses at ages 2, 4, or 6 months for the primary series but can be used as the final dose in children aged 12 months through 4 years.)
    • PCV #4 (Usually between 12 - 15 months)
    • IPV #3 (Usually between 6-18 months)
    • MMR #1 (usually between 12 -15 months)
    • Varicella #1 (usually between 12 -15 months)
    • Hepatitis A #1 (Not before 12 months; 2nd dose 6 months apart)
  10. RV stands for what and is given when
    • RV stands for Roto Virus
    • Given at 2, 4 and 6 months
    • The minimum interval between doses of rotavirus vaccine is 4 weeks. The maximum age for the last dose of rotavirus vaccine is 8 months and 0 days.
  11. DTaP stands for what and is given when?
    • Diphtheria and tetanus toxoids and acellular pertussis vaccine (DTaP).
    • (Minimum age: 6 weeks)
    • The fourth dose may be administered as early as age 12 months, provided at least 6 months have elapsed since the third dose.4.
  12. Hib stands for what and is given when?
    • Haemophilus influenzae type b conjugate vaccine (Hib).
    • (Minimum age:6 weeks)
    • If PRP-OMP (PedvaxHIB or Comvax [HepB-Hib]) is administered at ages 2 and 4 months, a dose at age 6 months is not indicated.
    • Hiberix should not be used for doses at ages 2, 4, or 6 months for the primary series but can be used as the final dose in children aged 12 months through 4 years.
  13. PCV stands for what and is given when?
    • PCV13 (Prevnar 13, Pfizer) -- which added 6 new serotypes (1, 3, 5, 6A, 7F, and 19A). Together, these 13 serotypes account for the majority of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) in the U.S., including serotype 19A, which is the most common IPD-causing serotype in young children.
    • 3 doses starting at 2 months, 8 weeks apart; 4th dose at age 12-15 months. (i.e. 2, 4, 6, 12 months)
  14. What does IPV stands for and when is it given?
    • Inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV).
    • (Minimum age: 6 weeks)
    • If 4 or more doses are administered prior to age 4 years an additional doseshould be administered at age 4 through 6 years.
    • The final dose in the series should be administered on or after the fourth birthday and at least 6 months following the previous dose.
    • (2 months, 4 months, 6-18 months, and 4-6 years.)
  15. What is the minimum age for Influenza is given how often?
    • Minimum age:
    • 6 months for trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine [TIV];
    • 2 years for live, attenuated influenza vaccine [LAIV])
  16. What is the stipulation for giving children 2 - 4 years of age?
    LAIV should not be given to children aged 2 through 4 years who have had wheezing in the past 12 months.
  17. What is the directions for children who have never received an influenza immunization or have just received one the year before?
    • Administer 2 doses (separated by at least 4 weeks) to children aged 6 months through 8 years who are receiving seasonal influenza vaccine for the first time or who were vaccinated for the first time during the previous influenza season but only received 1 dose.
    • Children aged 6 months through 8 years who received no doses of monovalent 2009 H1N1 vaccine should receive 2 doses of 2010–2011 seasonal influenza vaccine.
  18. What does MMR stand for and when is it given?
    • Measles, mumps, and rubella vaccine (MMR). (Minimum age: 12 months)
    • The second dose may be administered before age 4 years, provided at least 4 weeks have elapsed since the first dose.
  19. When is the varicella vaccine given?
    • Minimum age: 12 months
    • The second dose may be administered before age 4 years, provided at least 3 months have elapsed since the first dose.
    • For children aged 12 months through 12 years the recommended minimum interval between doses is 3 months. However, if the second dose was administered at least 4 weeks after the first dose, it can be accepted as valid.
    • 12 months and 4 years of age
  20. Hep A stands for what and is given when?
    • Minimum age: 12 months
    • Administer 2 doses at least 6 months apart.
    • Hep A is recommended for children aged older than 23 months who live inareas where vaccination programs target older children, who are at increased risk for infection, or for whom immunity against hepatitis A is desired.
    • 12 and 18 months
  21. What is MCV4 and when is it given?
    • Meningococcal conjugate vaccine, quadrivalent (MCV4).
    • Minimum age: 2 years
    • Administer 2 doses of MCV4 at least 8 weeks apart to children aged 2 through 10 years with persistent complement component deficiency and anatomic or functional asplenia, and 1 dose every 5 years thereafter.
    • Persons with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection who are vaccinated with MCV4 should receive 2 doses at least 8 weeks apart.
    • Administer 1 dose of MCV4 to children aged 2 through 10 years who travel to countries with highly endemic or epidemic disease and during outbreaks caused by a vaccine serogroup.
    • Administer MCV4 to children at continued risk for meningococcal disease who were previously vaccinated with MCV4 or meningococcal polysaccharidevaccine after 3 years if the first dose was administered at age 2 through 6 years.
  22. What is Tdap and how often can you give them?
    • Tetanus and diphtheria toxoids and acellular pertussis vaccine (Tdap)
    • Minimum age: 10 years for Boostrix and 11 years for Adacel
    • Persons aged 11 through 18 years who have not received Tdap should receive a dose followed by Td booster doses every 10 years thereafter.
    • Persons aged 7 through 10 years who are not fully immunized against pertussis (including those never vaccinated or with unknown pertussis vaccination status) should receive a single dose of Tdap.
    • Refer to the catch-upschedule if additional doses of tetanus and diphtheria toxoid–containingvaccine are needed.
    • Tdap can be administered regardless of the interval since the last tetanusand diphtheria toxoid–containing vaccine.
  23. What is HPV and how often can one give it?
    • Human papillomavirus vaccine (HPV).
    • Minimum age: 9 years
    • Quadrivalent HPV vaccine (HPV4) or bivalent HPV vaccine (HPV2) is recommendedfor the prevention of cervical precancers and cancers in females.
    • HPV4 is recommended for prevention of cervical precancers, cancers, and genital warts in females.
    • HPV4 may be administered in a 3-dose series to males aged 9 through 18years to reduce their likelihood of genital warts.
    • Administer the second dose 1 to 2 months after the first dose and the thirddose 6 months after the first dose (at least 24 weeks after the first dose).

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