Insulin

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Author:
dsherman
ID:
92388
Filename:
Insulin
Updated:
2011-06-30 06:52:24
Tags:
Insulin
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Description:
Insulin
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  1. Lispro (Humalog)
    • Action: Short Duration: Rapid Acting
    • Onset: 15-30 min
    • Peak: 0.5-2.5 hr
    • Duration: 3.0-6.5 hr
  2. aspart (NovoLog)
    • Action: Short Duration: Rapid Acting
    • Onset: 10-20 min
    • Peak: 1.0-3.0 hr
    • Duration: 3.0-5.0 hr
  3. glulisine (Apidra)
    • Action: Short Duration: Rapid Acting
    • Onset: 10-15 min
    • Peak: 1.0-1.5 hr
    • Duration: 3.0-5.0 hr
  4. Regular insulin (Humulin R)
    • Action: Short Duration: Slow Acting
    • Onset: 30-60 min
    • Peak: 1-5 hr
    • Duration: 6-10 hr
  5. NPH insulin (Humulin N)
    • Action: intermediate
    • Onset: 60-120 min
    • Peak: 6-14 hr
    • Duration: 16-24 hr
  6. detemir (Levemir)
    • Action: intermediate
    • Onset: ----
    • Peak: 6-8 hr
    • Duration: 12-24 hr
  7. glargine (Lantus)
    • Action: long duration
    • Onset: 70 min
    • Peak: none
    • Duration: 24 hr
    • (do not mix lantus with other insulins)
  8. Exubera
    • Action: Inhaled (short; duration; slow acting)
    • Onset: 15-30
    • Peak: 0.5-1.5 hr
    • Duration: 6.5 hr
  9. Nursing implications when administering insulin
    • U100 insulin is the most common concentration (70/30)
    • NPH is the only cloudy insulin, roll vial gently between palms to mix
    • draw up clear (regular, lispro-short acting) before (intermediate) insulin to prevent contaminating a short-acting insulin with a long-acting insulin
    • inject subcutaneously; aspiration is not necessary
    • acoid massaging the site after injection
    • rotate sites within anatomic area; the abdmen is preferred for more rapid, even absorption
    • exubera is an inhaled insulin; the dose may be very different from an injected insulin
    • clean inhaler once a week and replace the release unit every 2 weeks
    • inhaled insulin can replace mealtime insulin but does not provide basal glycemic control; need to also use and intermediate or long-acting insulin

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